The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Sir,
I found this sentence written on the board of the platform of Delhi Metro; a train transportation facility in my country India, "Any person found breaking rules in Delhi Metro will be handed over to the police for producing before the court.
I wonder why the writter used the phrase 'For producing' instead of 'To produce' in this sentence

Hello SonuKumar,

The sentence does not look correct to me, but it's not our role to correct sentences from signs around the world! We're happy to answers questions on our own materials or the information about English on our pages, of course.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
I think these two sentences here have a little difference between them.
A. Am I right to think that you're a bad guy ?
B. Am I right in thinking that you're a bad guy ?
I think in first sentence, the person asks if he is a right person to think that the other person is a bad guy or if it should be someone else who should ask so.

And in the second sentence, the person asks if he is right in thinking, meaning if it's true, that the other person is a bad guy.

What is your take on this ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Both sentences have the same meaning. They suggest that the other person is a bad guy and challenge him to confirm it.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
This complex sentence is to be changed to simple sentence :

As I entered the post office, the post master presented me with a telegram.

The answer in the book is :

Entering the post office, I was presented with a telegram by the postmaster.

Sir , here in the answer there are still two clauses :

1) Entering the post office : Adverbial participle clause
2) I was presented with a ...

With the two clauses would the sentence be called ' Simple sentence '

Your views please

Regards

Hello dipakrgandhi,

I'm afraid we don't provide answers to exercises from elsewhere. We're happy to comment on our own material or to explain particular points of confusion, but we don't offer help with homework or tests, or provide answers to tasks from other sources.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct:
When we have an important conversation at work etc and someone talks but the other person doesn't pay attention can we use the following expression:
I feel/think that I am standing here alone(all this time that I talk)
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

I think the normal way to say this would be this:

I feel like I'm talking to myself here.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there, I didn't understand why we used "be influenced" instead of "is influenced" , can you help me ?
Thanks.

Geopolitics suggest that a state's foreign policy "be influenced" by its desire to obtain, for example , sufficient agricultural land.

Hi GokaydinBariss,

'Be' is a present subjunctive.

Verbs such as 'suggest', 'insist' and 'demand' are often followed by a subjunctive form:

I demand that he go immediately.

I insist that he be fired.

Geopolitics suggest that it be influenced by...

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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