We use a noun with ’s with a singular noun to show possession:

We are having a party at John’s house.
Michael drove his friend’s car.

We use s’ with a plural noun ending in -s:

This is my parents’ house.
Those are ladies’ shoes.

But we use ’s with other plural nouns:

These are men’s shoes.
Children’s clothes are very expensive.

We can use a possessive instead of a noun phrase to avoid repeating words:

 

Is that John’s car?   No, it’s Mary’s [car]. > No, it’s Mary’s.
Whose coat is this?   It’s my wife’s [coat]. > It’s my wife’s.

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

I believe that the answer for the phrase below is wrong
"It depends on my partners' decision." How many people are going to decide?
The answer says it is more than one, but my partner is one person, not more than one!

Hello Hegerty,

The apostrophe follows the s when more than one person is being referred to, so the answer is more than one.

Partner can be used to describe people in business, for example, or other arrangements. It is quite a general word.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Can you please tell me which is correct .
Lion's paws or Lions' paws
Neighbour's pool or neighbours' pool
This is for possessives

It depends if you are talking about one lion or many lions.
one lion's paws, two lions' paws

I don't see an answer for this . I did go through the examples . But I am not sure of the "Lion's paw"
One lion has four paws .
please clear my doubts
many thanks
sumanasc

Hello sumanasc,

If you are speaking about one paw only then you can say 'the lion's paw'.

the lion's paw - you are speaking about one lion and one of its paws

the lion's paws - you are speaking about one lion and more than one of its paws

the lions' paws - you are speaking about more than one lion and more than one of their paws

Onviously we would not speak about 'the lions' paw' as this would suggest one paw shared by more than one lion, which is not possible.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello there,

Could you please tell me which of the following sentence is correct:

The form will require QA Manager approval
or
The form will require QA Manager's approval

Kind Regards,
SK

Hello SK,

Ideally I'd be able to see the context, but between these two, I'd say the first one. Or '... the QA Manager's approval' would also work I'd say.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

one's wit's end
Or
One's wits' end
Which is right in grammar??

Hello Rahul lamba,

'wits' is a plural noun and 'one' is singular, so 'one's wits' end' is the correct form.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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