Richard goes behind the scenes at Dyson, home of the space-age vacuum cleaner and much more!

Task 1

Which of these things is Richard shown in the video?

Exercise

Task 2

What do these numbers refer to in the video?

Exercise

Task 3

Drag the words to complete the sentences from the video.

Exercise

Task 4

Type 'which' or 'that/which' into these sentences.

Exercise

Discussion

Download

Language level

Advanced: C1
Upper intermediate: B2

Comments

I like gadgets and technology which make your life simpler and more interesting instead of making you lazier and less productive. I partly agree that for the majority of people internet is a source which opens the whole world locking up in one room.
I prefer some running gear and a watch with GPS and heart monitor is my favourite gadget so far. А smart phone is another one that I like because of its versatility. I would definitely like to own a GoPro camera or even two.
I really like cool Dyson's fan and a cordless vacuum cleaner. It would be great to become an owner of the ones.

Hello The LearnEnglish Team!
These two sentences seem strange to me (Task1):
'Which of these things is Richard shown in the video?';
'Choose the gadgets that Richard is shown in the video.'
Is the word order correct here according to the usage of Passive Voice or the sentences aren't meant to be passive?
Thank you in advance!
Dima

Hello Dima,

Both sentences have passive verb forms, but the sentences have different structures.

 

The first sentence is a 'normal' question. It is a subject question with a passive verb form. For information on subject questions see this page.

 

The second sentence is not a question. It has an imperative verb form ('Choose') with an object ('the gadgets'), followed by a relative clause describing the object ('that Richard is shown...').

 

I hope that clarifies it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sorry, but they're still unusual to me. I would say 'Which of these things is shown by Richard in the video?' and form the second one using the same structure in the relative clause 'that is shown by Richard'.
Best regards,
Dima

Hello Dima,

Double object verbs such as 'show', which can be followed by two objects (i.e. a direct and indirect object), can be rendered in the passive in two different ways. In the first, the indirect object becomes the subject of the passive verb, whereas in the second, the direct object becomes the subject.

For example, take the sentence 'Tom shows Richard two gadgets.' 'Richard' is the indirect object and 'two gadgets' is the direct object. This sentence can be made passive in the two ways I mentioned above:

  1. Richard is shown two gadgets.
  2. Two gadgets are shown to Richard.

I expect that the first passive form above is the one that looks strange to you. It is indeed a bit unusual compared to other European languages, but it is perfectly normal in English, though this only happens with double object verbs.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Now I totally understand where I was mistaken! I somehow kept thinking that those actions were performed by Richard and not towards him. Excuse me for that foolish mistake and thank you for the support!
Best wishes,
Dima

Technology is important because it helps us to have a good orientation to everything we handle daily

Hello,
''The British love gadgets.'' Is it the use of definte article necessary in this sentence? It doesn't refer to somethig general?

Hello Liviu86,

You're right when you say that the definite article isn't generally used to refer to something general, but when referring to a nationality, i.e. the people of a nation, the definite article 'the' is used, e.g. 'The British drink a lot of tea', 'The French make good bread', etc.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much for replying to my question.

Pages