The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct:
If someone gives exercises for maths/physics etc, can we say:
There is a reason why they are giving you this exercises. It's practicing, not just something to read or write.
1. There is a reason they are giving you/give you?
2. It's practicing?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

In 1, 'they are giving you' is better. As for 2, I'd say 'They're for practice'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct;
If we want to wish for holidays(for Christmas, for example)
Can we say
I wish you have a nice holiday?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

I wish you a happy holiday!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct.
If I start reading a book on Monday and I will finish reading it on Sunday.
I can say; I have started reading a book and I will finish reading it by the end of this week? or at the end of this week?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

Before we can answer this question, you need to make it clear when you are saying this. Is it before Monday or after Monday?

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
If I start reading a book after Monday or on Monday (morning).
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

Thank you for the clarification.

The sentence is fine. The difference between 'by the end of the week' and 'at the end of the week' is as follows:

at the end of the week - this tells us you will finish on Sunday (if we say that is the last day of the week)

by the end of the week - this tells us you will finish on or some time before Sunday, but not exactly when

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following are correct;
If we do something in parallel, can we say;
I work and study( go to the university for example) at the same time?
I do this and that simultaneously?
2. The correct is go to the university or go to a university or go to university?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

I think it's perfectly correct to say 'I work and study at the same time'.

 

If you are a student then you go to university. If you are visiting a university to, for example, admire the architecture or use the library then you go to the/a university, depending on whether you are referring to a specific and known university or not. 

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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