Rob and Ashlie discuss how to use ‘going to’ and ‘will’ to talk about plans and make predictions.

Watch the video. Then go to Task and do the activities.

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Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Well, I needed to ask this question:
Can we use 'since' with simple present tense except in the construction: "It is/It was"

Eg- Is this correct: He is residing here since 1950.
Or, Is it necessary to write it as: He HAS BEEN residing here since 1950.

P.S Pardon me for asking this really relevant and baffling question here for I didn't find the place where I should have.

Hello kapsam,

The correct form is 'has been' - we use the present perfect to describe a state which began in the past and continues to the present.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Yes, we do. But do we not make an exception in the case: It is a long time since we met/It has been a long time since we met. Here, both are correct.
X: Since when is he residing here?
Y: He is residing here since 1950.

Y's response didn't sound aberrant to me, and because I knew about the exception in the case: It is/ it was,.. is why I thought we could apply the same here.

Hello kapsam,

I'm not aware of the exception you speak about. Many of my students here in Spain also use this kind of structure, as it is the structure used in Spanish or Catalan, but in standard English, as Peter explained, the present perfect is the correct form.

In standard English, a perfect tense, not a present one, is used to speak about how long something has been happening.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I have a question-

"The paper attempts to reveal that possibility of multiple perspectives problematizes access to absolute truth."

Is it a correct sentence? Does it require 'the' before 'possibility' and 'access'?

Hello raj.kumar123,

'The' is needed before 'possibility' but not necessarily before 'access' - whether or not the second definite article is needed is context-dependent.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for your response. Could you please tell me why 'the' is needed before 'possibility' if the sentence is used in general sense?

Hello raj.kumar123,

The use of articles is more complex than that. You can find a good general explanation of when to use 'the' on our definite article page, and I'd also recommend you look through our indefinite article page as well. The sentence you ask about doesn't sound like an introductory sentence, and so presumably the possibility it speaks about has already been mentioned. This is one way of understanding why 'the' is needed here.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Kirk, there is no concept of 'the' in my mother tongue. Consequently, I face difficulty while using it in English. The following sentence is the introduction to one my papers:
"A, B, C Works have been chosen for a brief study of the representation of India, a country which is marked by pluralism. The paper attempts to reveal that possibility of multiple perspectives problematizes access to Truth." In the second sentence, I have not used 'the' before possibility because I have used it in very general sense. Is this a correct sentence? What is your take on it?

Hi raj.kumar123,

Thanks for providing the full context for the sentence you ask about. Some kind of article, probably 'the', is definitely needed before 'possibility'. I don't see 'possibility' being used in such a general sense here; it seems to me you're speaking about a definite, specific possibility, i.e. that there can be multiple perspectives. These perspectives can be diverse, but the possibility of them existing is something you've already mentioned in the first sentence.

I hope this helps. Articles can be a challenge, even for people whose native languages have them, so I'd encourage you to keep working on this. The more you read and write, the more you will come to understand them.

By the way, could you please ask questions such as this one on a more relevant page, e.g. definite article? That way other uses can benefit from your questions, too. Thanks.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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