The challenge is on, but first Ashlie and Stephen must decide what art to make. Stephen seems to be doing well, but there's a soapy surprise in store for his customers.

Instructions

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to the Tasks and do the activities. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Task 1

Is it Ashlie or Stephen who does these things? Drag the correct name into the gaps.

Exercise

Task 2

Type numbers from the video into the spaces to complete the sentences.

Exercise

Task 3

Type in the missing words. Use the first letters to help you.

Exercise

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guys I have a question please help me,
is "bottom-dweller " bad word and does it mean specifically?

Hello Mojtaba Omer,

Yes, 'bottom-dweller' refers to a person of low moral character without scruples, willing to use any means to achieve his or her goals. It is not a rude word in the sense of profanity but it is highly pejorative.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I've never made things to sell, but once I bought soft drinks to resell them in order to make pocket money with my brother.
A good salesperson need to be confident, he has to know his products. And first of all, he has to be kind with people.
If i've got a problem with something I bought, I throw it to the person's face who sold it to me. Just joking. No, I bring it back to him and try to have an other one. If I can't find a good item, I ask for a refund.

Hi Team.
Sorry , as usual, Could you help me, please? ;)
I want to record these words or sentences in mind with the right understanding. Honestly, I've a confusion with the sentences "What about" and "How about".
Ashlie : What about this Stephen?
(Ashlie shows a big painting to Stephen)
So, I make conclusion that "what about" here is about Noun but not Human, a painting.
Shop Assistant : sure, how about this? It's candle-making kit.
and then, I get distructed when the shop assistant said "How about this".
"How about" here is also about Noun, isn't it?
Why didn't he use "What about here"?
What about you? or How about you?
Which ones is correct?
Thank you very much.

Hello Nizam Balinese,

There is very little difference between these and I cannot think of a context in which they would not be interchangeable.

The only real difference in use is when you want to introduce an objection or problem. For this you use 'what about':

The bed is fine but what about the chairs? They're horrible!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ok, Thank you very much Peter.
I really appreciate your help.
thank you.

No, I haven't.
He/She must be cheerful and patient, not bad-tempered.
I give the product back to the shop with its bill.

If there is a problem with a product I buy, I go to the place where I bought it and talk with the customer service.

"there's a soapy surprise in store for his customers"
Can you explain for me clearly about "soapy". What do they mean by using this word?
Thanks a million!

Hello tamori,

'Soapy' is the adjective from the noun 'soap' and it means covered in soap, similar to soap or related to soap in some way. Stephen is trying to make soap in the video, so that is why it is a 'soapy surprise'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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