In this first episode our friends meet up in a café.

BCSW - Meeting friends

Instructions

Do the Preparation task first. Then listen to the audio. Next go to each Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

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B1

Comments

Hi I'm from Iraq I tray to learn English

Hello!Can you help me, please?
If you live out of the water too quickly,bubbles form in your blood.What does "live out" mean here?Can you explain with other words?
Students visit their ICC and take part in forums , debates.Is "ICC" Internet Computer Center or International Chamber of Commerce here?Thanks beforehand!

Hello mehinaydinli,

I'm afraid 'live out' is not correct in this sentence. The correct word(s) would be something like 'leave the water' or 'come up through the water'.

I would guess that ICC is 'International Chamber of Commerce' but I am only guessing here as this is a sentence without any context and is not one of our sentences. I'm afaid I don't have universal knowledge of the contexts of all sentences!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello sir,
"the bus has passed on just 15 minutes before" is this sentence right
or this one is right
"the bus passed just 15 minutes before"
in the first sentence cant i use time (15 minutes) with present perfect tense if it so can i say "i have come yesterday" please guide me.

Hello Afia shakir khan,

You can use either past simple or present perfect for a sentence like that, but I'd say 'ago' instead of 'before'. This is because you can see 15 minutes ago as either a finished past time or a time that is still connected to the present.

'I have come yesterday' is not correct, however, because 'yesterday' is considered a finished past time in English. Instead, you should use the past simple. You can find more about both of these tenses in our English Grammar section or see the video on Transport and Travel Scene 2- Language Focus.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!Can you tell me if "butterfly" compound noun?
If we change this sentence "He told a story to me." into the passive voice we get"The story was told to me."
But if we change "He told me a story ."into the passive we get "The story was told me."(without "to") Is this sentence correct?

Hello mehinaydinli,

A compound noun is a noun made of two or more words. They are can be joined together as one word ('postman') or divided by a hyphen ('mother-in-law'), but they are usually separate words ('coffee table'). There is no hard-and-fast rule as to how to distinguish a one-word compound noun from a noun which merely looks like it is made of two words, but fortunately this does not matter as grammatically there is no difference in how they are used. I would say that 'butterfly' is not a compound noun, as the parts that we can see do not contribute to the meaning; I think it is more likely that this is a noun which looks like it is made of two parts. There is no way to be sure, however, without researching the etymology of the word.

The form 'to me' in the sentences you quote is the most common. However, 'the story was told me' is also possible. Similarly, we can say 'it was given me' and 'it was promised me', for example.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Thank you very much!

I don't understand what Olivia means when she says "wait here long enough, most of London will come in"? Help me, please.

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