Series 1 Episode 1 - Meeting Friends

 

In this first episode our friends meet up in a café.

Tasks

Preparation

Do the vocabulary activity below before you listen. Then listen to the episode and do the first two tasks to check your understanding. Finally, practise some grammar in Tasks 3 and 4. You can read the transcript at any stage if you want.

Exercise

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Comments

Dear Team Leader,

I am reading widely to improve my English, and here I have two sentences that I came across:

1. He promised marriage, and she readily accepted.

2. He was glad to meet her, and she was as delighted to see him.

Must there be a 'it' after 'accepted' in the first sentence?

Is the use of 'as' in the second sentence correct or appropriate?

Thanks for your patience,

Yours sincerely,
Chen Laifa

Hi Chen Laifa,

That's great that you're reading widely - it's a fantastic way to improve your English. Regarding your questions: 1) no, it's not necessary. If you look up 'accept' in our dictionary, you'll see under the second definition (when it means to say 'yes' to an offer), the verb can be transitive [T] or intransitive [I]. Without 'it', it is intransitive, and this is probably the more common form.

As for 2), 'as' is indeed correct. It's a comparative form expressing the idea that both of them were equally happy to meet/see each other. This is mentioned on our As and Like page.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Team Leader,

Please advise whether the following sentence is correct:

That picture resembled what I saw of him a few months ago.

Does 'of' follow 'saw'?

Thanks,

Yours sincerely,

Chen laifa

Hi Chen Laifa,

'of' cannot simply be removed without rendering the sentence ungrammatical, and here suggests that the subject didn't see him completely - as if they'd had only a partial view of him. 'of' doesn't go with the verb 'follow', but rather with 'him'.

For this kind of question, I'd recommend that you consult a concordancer, which is essentially a huge collection of sentences produced by native speakers. You can search it to see how words have been used. A couple of good free online concordancers are the British National Corpus and the COCA. If you search for 'follow of', you'll see few results and in all of those cases, as in this one, 'of' go is part of the phrase after the verb 'follow'.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

It's useful, I think this website can help me to improve my english skills

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