Magda receives the result of her job interview, whilst Sarah continues to have problems with her house.

BCSW - I'm an architect

Instructions

Do the Preparation task first. Then listen to the audio. Next go to each Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

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Comments

I didn't understand the meaning of this sentence :
Olivia: I see...that’s not on, is it?
Could you explain it?

Hello daizykiran,

This is a very informal expression which means 'that's not acceptable' or 'that's not OK'. It's quite common in informal speech, but we would not use it in more formal contexts.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter,

To be frank, after listening to this episode several times, me either, I could not catach the expression meaning of "that's not on". But now, I am crystal clear. Thank you for the help.

Best regards,
Kaofeng

Hi,I am glad to know some new words this lesson. But I can't understand "a trial basis' and 'internship'.I read all the transcript and find the dictional too,still confuse. Could you help me how to understand these words and how to use it? Thank you.
:)

Hi Wendy1988,

If something is done on a trial basis then it is done for a short time to see if it is a good idea or not. For example, a company might hire someone 'on a trial basis', meaning that they will make a decision later as to whether to make the job permanent or not.

An internship is a position in a company for someone who is still finishing their training or education. It may or may not be paid and is a way of gaining practical experience while still learning.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi! I would like to thank you for your wonderful job and your patience ;-).
There is just a little error that I saw in the transcript.

When Sarah says: "She’s a good one too Harry – I’ve seen some of her drawings.",
in the audio, Harry interrupt Sarah saying: "Ooh! Really Sarah?", in the transcript this Harry's comment is not present.

Many thanks again!!!

Hi Debbybb,

Thank you for your comment, and for pointing out the issue with the audioscript. We'll edit the page to better match the audio.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I've very appreciate it.

wow! The Cambridge Dictionaries online is great. You know, any trouble I get is solved quickly and easily.
But there is a thing I don't understand: sometimes they add word "get" for example : "I'd like to get to know about it"
but I can say "I'd like to know about it" or "I know about it"
Are 3 ways different?
Thanks in advance !

Hello Nguyen Viet Dung,

'Get to know' refers to the process of going from not knowing to knowing. 'Know' describes the state of having the information.

'Would like' is used when we are talking about a goal or aim - something which is not yet true, but which we hope will be true some time.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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