Why do we use adverbials?

We use adverbs to give more information about the verb.

We use adverbials of manner to say how something happens or how something is done:

The children were playing happily.
He was driving as fast as possible.

We use adverbials of place to say where something happens:

I saw him there.
We met in London.

We use adverbials of time to say when or how often something happens:

They start work at six thirty.
They usually go to work by bus.

We use adverbials of probability to show how certain we are about something.

  • Perhaps the weather will be fine.
  • He is certainly coming to the party.

 

Try these tasks to practice your use of adverbials.

Task 1

Exercise

Task 2

Exercise

Task 3

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Kirk;
How can I get a plan of study?

Hello Emerson,

LearnEnglish is not a course in the conventional sense so we do not have plans of study for our users. Instead, the site functions as an open-access organised collection of materials for guided self-study. You can search for materials by level, topic or language structure and organise your own study.

For more information on how to use LearnEnglish please visit our Getting Started section.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi dear teachers.
This is Ali from Iran,first of all i would say thank you for your amazing website ,i really like it.
I have question from you,how can i improve my konwing in vocabulary,i mean difficult vocab and difficult synonym,no just simple words.
Best wish Ali.

Hello again Ali boroki,

I'm very glad you're finding LearnEnglish useful, and we appreciate you letting us know. I would recommend you follow the advice on improving your vocabulary in our Frequently asked questions.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Noted Maam,

Lacking transmittal letter for us to received the above submission.

Please be guided accordingly.

Thank you.( PLS HELP ME UNDERSTAND THE CONTEXT. IS SUBMISSION OK OR NOT?)

Hello Meeja,

I'm afraid I don't understand this message very well. Perhaps with context I could make more sense of it, but without knowing what it refers to it's difficult to say much more than that it seems to communicate that a 'transmittal letter' that was expected did not arrive.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''Doctors in that city only check you up on Fridays'' vs ''Doctors in that city only check you on Fridays''

What is the difference between these sentences when the adverb (up) is used?

Thank you very much.

Hello JamlMakav,

At least in the varieties of English I'm familiar with, the first sentence is not idiomatic (i.e. not something people say). Please see the dictionary entries for 'check', 'check-up' and 'check up on sb' to see how these different forms are used.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Good exercise.

Hello dear team,

The children were playing happily.
Happily=adverb

The happily children were playing.
Happily = adjective

Is that correct?

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