We use comparative adjectives to describe people and things:

This car is certainly better but it’s much more expensive.
I’m feeling happier now.
We need a bigger garden

We use than when we want to compare one thing with another:

She is two years older than me.
New York is much bigger than Boston.
He is a better player than Ronaldo.
France is a bigger country than Britain.

When we want to describe how something or someone changes we can use two comparatives with and:

The balloon got bigger and bigger.
Everything is getting more and more expensive.
Grandfather is looking older and older

We often use the with comparative adjectives to show that one thing depends on another:

When you drive faster it is more dangerous
> The faster you drive, the more dangerous it is.
When they climbed higher it got colder
> The higher they climbed, the colder it got.

Superlative adjectives:

We use the with a superlative:

It was the happiest day of my life.
Everest is the highest mountain in the world.
That’s the best film I have seen this year.
I have three sisters, Jan is the oldest and Angela is the youngest

Activities
 

Type the correct comparative adjectives into the gaps

 

Complete the sentences with comparative forms

 

Type the correct superlative adjectives into the gaps

 

Section: 

Comments

Hello,

The context is that Joe is being French even though he is not, and Sarah is using irony. The adjective isn't gradable, so how can she express what I mean?

Sarah to Joe: ''Can't you be more of French?''

Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

If you take out 'of', the sentence will work. You could also change the verb to 'act' and it will also work (without 'of').

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again!!
I would like to ask whether the second "as" in the "as...as" structure can be implied, when there are no modifiers, as well.
Eg. -"I thought Route 6 was the quickest way to get to the airport."
-"Jackson Boulevard can be as fast."

Jason is very energetic. Sonia isn't as/so energetic.

Thank you once again!!

Hello kelly,

Yes, you can leave out the second 'as' phrase. Your two sentences are correct. Good work!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Wow, that was a really fast response!!!
Thank you very much!!
Kelly

Hello!!

I would like to ask about a structure with "as" in comparison.
It is correct to say the following:
-"I thought Route 6 was the quickest way to get to the airport."
-"Jackson Boulevard can be just as fast."
Obviously, the second "as" is missing because it is implied: "It can be just as fast as Route 6."

How about using the same structure with the second "as" missing with negative sentences that include modifiers "half, quite, nearly, anything like, anywhere near, nothing like, nowhere near"?

Eg. Jason is very energetic. Sonia isn't half/quite/nearly as energetic.

Her brother is very tall. She's nothing like as tall/nowhere near as tall.

Your dress is great. Her dress isn't anything like/ anywhere near as great.

Thank you so much!!
Kelly

Hello kelly s,

In answer to your questions:

It is correct to say the following:
-"I thought Route 6 was the quickest way to get to the airport."
-"Jackson Boulevard can be just as fast."
Obviously, the second "as" is missing because it is implied: "It can be just as fast as Route 6."

Yes, that is fine. The second 'as' is implied, as you say.

 

How about using the same structure with the second "as" missing with negative sentences that include modifiers "half, quite, nearly, anything like, anywhere near, nothing like, nowhere near"?

Eg. Jason is very energetic. Sonia isn't half/quite/nearly as energetic.

Her brother is very tall. She's nothing like as tall/nowhere near as tall.

Your dress is great. Her dress isn't anything like/ anywhere near as great.

Those are also all correct. Well done! We can omit the second part of the comparison when it is clear from the context.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much for your quick reply!!

Hello,
I just wanted to know about comparative and superlative form of the word kind..
Is it kinder and kindest or more kind and most kind...

Hello Sowmya Navada,

'Kind' is unusual in that it is a one-syllable word and so 'kinder' and 'kindest' would be expected. These are the most common forms but the forms with 'more' and 'most' are also used, particularly in slightly more formal written language.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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