Why do we use adverbials?

We use adverbs to give more information about the verb.

We use adverbials of manner to say how something happens or how something is done:

The children were playing happily.
He was driving as fast as possible.

We use adverbials of place to say where something happens:

I saw him there.
We met in London.

We use adverbials of time to say when or how often something happens:

They start work at six thirty.
They usually go to work by bus.

We use adverbials of probability to show how certain we are about something.

  • Perhaps the weather will be fine.
  • He is certainly coming to the party.


Try these tasks to practice your use of adverbials.

Task 1


Task 2


Task 3




Good evening!
I wanted to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct .
"As he is rich, he is not happy."

If I remember correctly, we can use simple or continuous aspect after 'as'.
But are these correct sentences?
1. Just as he raised his harpoon, silence broke.
2. As he ran towards the children, he slipped.
Thank you.

Hello Marua,

Yes, that is correct -- both aspects are possible and the verb forms you use after 'as' in these two sentences are correct. 'silence broke' isn't clear to me, though; perhaps 'the silence was broken'?

All the best,
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Teachers,
Could you kindly tell me which of the following sentences is correct with explanation:
1. I am very disappointed/tired.
2. I am very much disappointed/tired.
3. I am much disappointed/tired.
4. I am much too disappointed/tired.
5. I am too much disappointed/tired.

Dear Teachers,
Please comment.

Is this phrase gramatically correct?
"Although Chirstmas season is in summer in Australia,..."
"in Australia" is an adverbial of place, right?

Hello viettungvuong,

The sentence needs to be slightly changed:

Although Christmas is in the summer in Australia...

We generally just say 'Christmas' for the whole period as well as for just the day.

'In Australia' is an adverbial of place. You can read more about these on this page.



The LearnEnglish Team

Hello team :
can we use adverb to describe nouns
I read this sentence in subtital
of can programm
(it's named for rabidly declining low system)
why here rapidly not rapid

Hello nkmg,

The adverb 'rabidly' here does not describe a noun but an adjective: rabidly (adv) declining (adj).

Adverbs can describe pronouns but not nouns: absolutely everyone / hardly anyone / nearly all.

Certain adverbs can also function as adjectives, but they are not adverbs when used in this way: the very idea shocks me / at the very bottom of the sea.



The LearnEnglish Team

A restaurant on the top of the building.
A restaurant at the top of the building.
Which one is correct?