adverbs of manner

 

Adverbs of manner are usually formed from adjectives by adding –ly:

bad > badly; quiet > quietly; recent > recently; sudden > suddenly

but there are sometimes changes in spelling:

easy > easily; gentle > gently

If an adjective ends in –ly we use the phrase in a …. way to express manner:

Silly > He behaved in a silly way.
Friendly > She spoke in a friendly way.

A few adverbs of manner have the same form as the adjective:

They all worked hard.
She usually arrives late.
I hate driving fast.

Note: hardly and lately have different meanings:
He could hardly walk = It was difficult for him to walk.
I haven’t seen John lately = I haven’t seen John recently.

We often use phrases with like as adverbials of manner:

She slept like a baby.
He ran like a rabbit.

 

Adverbs of manner and link verbs

We very often use adverbials with like after link verbs:

Her hands felt like ice.
It smells like fresh bread.

But we do not use other adverbials of manner after link verbs. We use adjectives instead:

They looked happily happy.
That bread smells deliciously delicious.

Try these exercises to practice your use of adverbials of manner.

Try these tasks to practice your use of placement of adverbials.

Task 1

Exercise

Task 2

Exercise

Task 3

Exercise

Task 4

Exercise

Comments

Hello
firstly i would like to thank you again for your great usual support and effort
please i need to know why did you use greedily instead of greedy in one of your test question above
"the hungry cat looked greedily at the kitchen on the dinner table "
for me looked is a link verb so we should use adjective instead of adverb

Hello hamadbaghdadi,

In this sentence, 'looked' is not a link verb, but rather an action verb. 'greedily' is an adverb that modifies, i.e. tells us more about the way the cat was looking at the chicken (is that what you meant instead of 'kitchen'?). If 'looked' were a link verb here, the sentence would be something like 'The cat looked hungry and greedy as it looked at the chicken ...'.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello there,

Could you please tell which one is the correct?

I went to shop on Monday by car to get some things for reselling.
I went to shop by car on Monday to get some things for reselling.

The bus hit a tree in a road on Monday with a great force.
The bus hit a tree with a great force in a road on Monday.

The meeting will be started at the hotel on Monday at 5.00 PM.
The meeting well be started at the hotel at 5.00 PM on Monday.

Hello hrnmno,

The word order of these sentences is not fixed, so there is no one correct sequence. However, there are some other problems:

I went to a/the shop on Monday by car to get some things for reselling.
I went to a/the shop by car on Monday to get some things for reselling.

The bus hit a tree in the road on Monday with great force.
The bus hit a tree with great force in the road on Monday.

The meeting will start at the hotel on Monday at 5.00 PM.
The meeting will start at the hotel at 5.00 PM on Monday.

The use of articles is context-dependent, but these are the most likely choices.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello! Could you please explain me the meaning of the phrase ''link verb''. Thank you.

Hello Imladris,

You can find information on this, including examples and definitions, here.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

What is correct?

a) Congresses are taking place in regular bases
b) Congresses are taking place in a regular base
c) Congresses are taking place on a regular basis
d) Congresses are taking place on a regular base
e) Congresses are taking place on regular bases

What is the difference in using base vs basis in a sentence? Both words can mean a foundation of something.

Is there a link in the site where expressions like those can be found?

Thanks again!

Hi MayelaM,

I think what you mean here is on a regular basis, which basically means regularly. Is that correct? I'd suggest looking up phrases such as these in our Cambridge Dictionary search box. This particular expression is not found there, but most such expressions are.

By the way, the word congress is correct here, but I wanted to point out that the word conference is also often used with the same meaning, especially in American English.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

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