comparative adverbs

 

We can use comparative adverbs to show change or to make comparisons:

I forget things more often nowadays.
She began to speak more quickly.
They are working harder now.

We often use than with comparative adverbs

I forget things more often than I used to.
Girls usually work harder than boys.

Intensifiers:

We use these words and phrases as intensifiers with these patterns:

much - far - a lot - quite a lot - a great deal - a good deal - a good bit - a fair bit

I forget things much more often nowadays.

Mitigators:

We use these words and phrases as mitigators:

a bit - just a bit - a little - a little bit - just a little bit - slightly

She began to speak a bit more quickly

Exercise

Comments

Hello all
I would like to know if we could use the adverb of frequency "always " in the present perfect tense sentence?
thank you in advance for any help

Hello studa,

Certainly, if the action is one which started in the past and continues to the present, and we want to emphasise that it has always been true:

He's always loved her.

They've always dreamed of being famous.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you  so much Mr Peter for help .That s really kind of you

learn English team please tell me.
"the most luckiest man in the world." is that sentence correct or wrong?
can we use the "most" before spuerlitive?
please explain me..

Hello jrar!
According to my experience, we don't use most with words that end with est. For example, the luckiest, the weakest etc.
However we can use most to form superlatives. For example, the most beautiful, the most distant etc.
So the correct sentence should be: He is the luckiest man in the world.
 
I hope it is helpful.

That said  is vary useful to learning English languages for all ... 

hi
can i say something like:she danced slightly more awkwardly because of her leg injured instead saying she danced slightly more awkwardly because of her leg injury?
awaiting for your response:)
thanks
 
 

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