The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello,
Could you explain to me,why there is "would" in the if-part the next sentense.
1."I would be grateful if you would let me know your decision as soon as possible."
And also with wish the next one.
2."I wish you would listen."

Hello cheD1t,

Our will and would page describes most of the uses of 'would' and should help you understand how it's used in these cases. Our wishes and hypotheses and wish and if only pages are also relevant. After reading those pages, if you have any further questions, please feel free to ask us again – though please do so on one of those pages so that other users who have a similar query might find it as well.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello ELT
I have studied every part of the "English grammar" in this website and have every exercise. I'v got 100 percent almost in every task. but I still cant understand some topics like usage of to - infinitive / ing, adverbials, prepositions, simple and complex sentences...
don't you thing that the tasks given here are just too easy? I think they can only examine some primarily understanding of the topics. am I wright?

best regards

Hello Ambitious learner,

That's great – good work! Our English Grammar was written to cover the most common points that learners need to learn and/or have questions about, but it is not, as you rightly point out, comprehensive. I'm not sure if it's possible for you, but if you want to do more in-depth study, you might want to consider taking a class, because a teacher would get to know you and be able to recommend you specific sources much better than we can. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a British Council Teaching Centre in Afghanistan, but perhaps there's another place you could study?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi..
Could you please tell which one of the following sentences is correct?
" We started to enjoy the freshly baked bread our waiter had brought."
or " We started enjoying the freshly baked bread our waiter had brought."
Further, in the second part of the sentence past perfect is used, is it that due to this part is more past than the first part?

Hello ca.kulwinder,

'Start' and 'begin' can be followed by verbs in both the -ing and to + infinitive forms, and there is no real difference in meaning, so both sentences are fine.

We usually use the past perfect to refer to a past action previous to another past action. See our past perfect page for more detail on this.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

can you explaine the different between present perfect tense and present perfect continuous tense

Hello chathuri1982,

We have a page explaining this very point, with numerous examples. You can find it here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I am confused in using the word "would" . For example, sometimes it is used in past tense like:
When I was young I would go to the school.
It's also used for requests:
Would you get me a cup of tea, please?
Would you come here, please?
can I know where and why we should use the word "Would"?

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