The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Section: 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct
When we talked to someone for work for the first time( not to official but not too friendly)
It was a pleasure talking to you or
It was a pleasure speaking to you
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie2,

I think both of these are perfectly fine. You could also say 'talking with' and 'speaking with'. All of these are used as a polite comment in the same way and there is no real difference in meaning in this context.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct;When in some places, people use to eat late or later than other places(for example in some areas they eat dinner after 9 pm or 10 pm, or they may say Goodmorning after 12.30 pm) we say that these areas have a different rythm of time?
Thank you in advance

Hi angie,

I understand what you mean by 'rhythm of life' and it makes sense to me, but it doesn't sound all that natural. I would suggest perhaps 'pace of life' instead, though that doesn't necessarily refer to a different meal schedule – it's more about whether people are in a hurry or not. 

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I have a sentence this. " we know that the food we eat affects out whole life". I wonder is it correct?. This sentence has two verbs. Eat and affects.
Can u help me?

Thank you so much

Hi tryon,

The verbs in your sentence are correct and it sounds fine except that 'out' should be 'our'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Yes. Its "our". I mistook when i typed.
Can u explain more about this situation. I remember that english grammar rule doesnt accept two verbs in the same sentence.

Thank you very much

Hello tryon,

There is no rule that says you cannot have two verbs in the same sentence. In fact, that sentence has more than one verb in it.

Your sentence is quite correct. You have one main verb ('know') and a verb which is part of a relative clause ('eat'):

We know that the food (which) we eat affects our whole life.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

So what about affects?. I mean not two verbs next to each other. I remember i learned that is two verbs next to each other. In front of second verb is "to". Or the second verb is v+ing. For example: i try To learn. Or i love traveling.

Thanks

Hello tryon,

I'm not sure what your question is here. It's perfectly fine to say both of these. There is a difference in meaning:

I try to learn means you are attempting to do it successfully.

I try learning means you are testing to see if learning is enjoyable or helpful for you.

 

You can read more about verbs followed by the to infinitive form here.

You can read more about verbs followed by the -ing form here.

You can read more about verb patterns in general here.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Pages