The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello,

Which usage would be correct in formal English?

''The book is engrossing and a provocative work''
''The book is an engrossing and a provocative work''
''The book is an engrossing and provocative work''

Thank you.

Hello JamlMakav,

The first is not incorrect, just a bit awkward, but I'd recommend using the third one.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello!
"I do not go to school anymore"( becoz I finished my studies, I'm 18 yr old)
how can I tell it in a informal way ?
"It's over I have gone school" Is this correct?

Hello raj jk,

'no longer' is more formal than 'any more', so you could say 'I no longer go to school' or 'I am no longer a student'. You could also refer to school with 'studies', e.g. 'I finished my studies last year and now am working' or something like this.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

It means" It's over I've gone school" does not make sense?
thanks a lot to reply

Hello raj jk,

Yes, that sentence does not make sense.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you peter

Hello,

''Your mothers will cry when they see what you have done for them''

''I will make sure that you have played hookey and been in Paris''

''If you cried, I would have something that you would want to hear''

''I figured that I had done it''

Each subordinate clause has its own tense. In general, do the tenses depend on their usual usage in subordinate clauses?

I don't understand their usage in first(what you ha...), second, and third(that you...) sentence.

''I figured if I was going into the gun trade, I was going to aim high''

Are the tenses changed in both clauses due to future in the past?

Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

Yes, they can, but there are exceptions - for example, verbs in time clauses that refer to the future, as well as conditional sentences. Without knowing the speaker's intentions, or at least their contexts, it's difficult to explain the use of the verb tenses in the sentences you ask about. I'm afraid we don't regularly provide the service of providing explanations of sentences that are not part of our materials, especially when these explanations would require a good amount of time on our part. I would suggest you consider hiring a private teacher for this kind of thing.

If you want to choose one of these sentences to ask us about, please go ahead, but please give us the context. Some sentences could work in more than one way, and explaining these multiple scenarios is too time-consuming for us.

Please also do not post your questions more than once. We answer comments when we can, and if we answer others before you it's because we've already answered many of your questions in the past. We will answer yours when we are able to.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello team
if I'm learning math in a class and if I need to check my students whether they correct or not at a math
how to do it correctly and shortly
01. whose correct? raise your hand
02. whose is it correct rise your hand

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