The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello there - I hope you're well.

I don't know if it is the right local to ask this, but if so I have a doubt regarding an especfic English structure: which one is the correct and why: "Dead men tell no tales" or "Dead men don't tell tales"? The first one is a chapter from the book The Wolf of Wall Street that I'm reading (or trying to). I'm Brazilian and in Portuguese we use to say something like in the order of the second one above.

Can you help on that issue?

Many thanks!

Best,
Ewerton

Hello mswerton,

We can form a negative meaning in either way:

I have no time.

I don't have any time.

The meaning here is the same. The first form is more formal, more literary and less common.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you Peter - very helpful!

Hello .please tell me it is true to negate a noun clause when we use this noun clause as an object . For example,it is true to say:
"I know that this is not your book."
Thank you.

Hello rastak keen,

That is a correct sentence, yes, and we can use 'not' in that way.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Can you tell me the main difference between Clause and Phrase?

Hello Muhammad Hussain 786,

This is actually quite a complex question which goes into the realm of linguistics rather than langage learning. You can find definitions on these pages:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clause

 a clause is the smallest grammatical unit that can express a complete proposition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrase

a phrase is any group of words, or sometimes a single word, which plays a particular role within the grammatical structure of a sentence

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello. please tell me this sentence is true?
"There being so much noise,I could not hear what was going on."
I think the first part is wrong.I can not understand what is the role of (being).
With best regards.

Hello raskak keen,

That sentence is quite formal or literary, but is correct. The structure 'There being...' means the same as 'Because there was...' and is a literary way to express it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sirs,

Would you please clarify that while using the adjectives "good", "better", or "best" we must use "the" before them or not.

All the best,

Sayed Obaidullah Hashimi

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