The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello Sirs,

Would you please clarify that while using the adjectives "good", "better", or "best" we must use "the" before them or not.

All the best,

Sayed Obaidullah Hashimi

Hello Sayed Obaidullah Hashimi,

There is no rule that says 'the' must be used before these adjectives. The use of articles is governed by rules which are related to the meaning of nouns in sentences. It is true that superlatives such as 'best' are often preceded by 'the' because they describe specific unique things, but this is not always the case. Remember that these are adjectives, and articles are used with nouns, even if the noun is omitted from the sentence for stylistic reasons.

You can read about the use of articles, including 'the', on this page - use the links on the right for pages about particular articles.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello.would you tell me that this sentence is true?
"Extension of the countdown hold to14 hours was order to give crews more time to repair wiring and clear away equipment"
I think (hold) is wrong but I am not sure.
With sincere thanks.

Hello rastak keen,

Yes, I would say that 'was ordered' is more likely as a passive form; 'was order' is not correct here. As to the rest, I think 'An extension' is likely to be the correct form but it is hard to say for sure without knowing the context.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

I just read a sentences from newspaper whose structure of sentence I was confused about. It says "the company reduced its earnings guidance in June, citing issues including sales-force turnover that slowed sales growth".

Can you explain what kind of sentence/phrases that ", citing issues..." Is and how to construct such sentences? Can "citing issues..." be replaced with "The company cited issues..." And still conveying the same meaning?

Regards
Hugo

Hi Hugo,

Yes, 'citing issues...' could be replaced with 'The company cited issues', though you would need to start a new sentence rather than simply using a comma.

This is an example of a participle clause and we have a section on this. You can find it here and I think it will clarify this structure and its use for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, i 'd like to ask a question about grammar
which of the following sentences are true?
1.There is a bulb and a screwdriver in the drawer.
2. There are a bulb and a screwdriver in the drawer.

1.There is a book and two pens on the desk.
2.There are a book and two pens on the desk.

Hello Tting LEI,

The correct sentences are as follows:

There is a bulb and a screwdriver in the drawer.

There is a book and two pens on the desk.

We use 'is' or 'are' in this context to agree with the first of the nouns in the list. Thus we would say:

There is a book and two pens on the desk

but we would also say

There are two pens and a book on the desk

I hope that helps to clarify it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello The LearmEnglish Team,

Would you please guide me whether the following reply of mine was correct.
Actually yesterday I wrote to one of my colleagues in reply to her question about the joining date of my new job. I wrote that "the specific date has not determined yet".
Was it grammatically a correct sentence?

Regards,

Sayed Obaidullah Hashimi

Hello Sayed Obaidullah Hashimi,

That's almost correct – it just needs the verb 'be' in it: 'the specific date has not been determined yet'. 'has been determined' is a passive form of 'determine' in the present perfect.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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