The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hi there,

'I would go wherever you will go' - 'I would go wherever you go'

'I would go wherever you would go' - 'I would go wherever you went'

Does the first sentence refer to the future (as in I will go anywhere you go) or it have a modal verb use (willingness)?

Could the fourth sentence be referring to something counterfactual (past subjunctive) like ''would'' in the third sentence?

Thank you in advance.

Hello MCWSL,

The first sentence seems highly unlikely to me as it mixes a hypothetical form ('would') with a real form ('will'). Although it might be possible to imagine a context in which this is feasible it seems highly unlikely to be used in normal conversation. The second sentence 'I would go wherever you go'  refers to the future and has a hidden if-clause ('if you asked me' / 'if I could' etc).

The difference between the two sentences in the second pair is that the first includes elements of volition in both halves, conveying something of a sense of 'choose to go'. Again, a hidden if-clause can be imagined here. The second sentence does not have this element in the second half. Both sentences have a future time reference.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there,

'I do not know if I have seen her being afraid of'
'This is the supermarket where I went to shop at'

Are the prepositions required in the sentences above?

Thanks in advance

Hello JamlMakav,

No, the prepositions are not needed in those sentences.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

Thank you for the answer, sir.

Would they be left in formal English? What about informal one?

Thank you very much.

Hello JamlMakav,

No, we would not use prepositions at all here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''He hurt one of the guards feet''

Shouldn't it be ''one's'' because it says whose feet were hurt?

Thank you

Hello JakiGeh,

The word 'one' is correct. It is not a possessive form but part of the quantifier phrase 'one of...'

The possessive in the sentence should be guard's as the feet belong to the guard.

He hurt one of the guard's feet.

 

The sentence is ambiguous, by the way. It's not clear if you mean 'one foot out of the guard's two' or 'the feet of one of the (many) guards'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again,

Thank you for the answer.

So 'He hurt one of the guard's feet' would mean 'one foot out of two' and 'He hurt one of the guards' feet' would mean 'feet of one guard of the guards'

Thank you once again.

Hello JakiGeh,

Yes, that is correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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