The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct; When someone starts a new course at school or university ( for example maths, photography, literature etc), and does a step by step learning can we way
1)he/ she does a step by step learning and
2)it is a need to build the basis in order to continue to a more advanced level?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

The phrase 'step by step' is generally used as an adverb rather than an adjective, so a more natural way to say this would be 'learn things step by step'.

I would phrase the second sentence like this:

It is necessary to build a (good) foundation before moving on to more advanced areas/topics

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct;
Many friends move to other countries in order to work. Though with some of them I still am in contact or keep contact until today?
2. Do you work in an office or do you work from home? are the two prepositions in an office & from home correct?
Thank you in advance

Hi anie2,

You can say that you are still in contact with your friends or that you keep in touch with your friends. Using 'keep' implies action or even effort on your part, whereas 'be' does not, though it doesn't mean that effort isn't made.

Yes, those prepositions are correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct;
1. If you are on the street and you see a taxi, you raise your hand in order to call it? In this sentence are the verbs raise and call correct?
2. When we are tired can we say after a long period of difficult issues, I need time to recharge my batteries? is the expression recharge my batteries correct?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

All of those are correct. Well done!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct
1. When we want to go from one place to another we; get a taxi or take a taxi?
We get the bus or take the bus?
2.A person that moves to another country gets a visa or takes a visa?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

1. Both 'get' and 'take' are fine. 'Get' is perhaps a little more informal, but both are commonly used.

2. With visas the word is 'get' rather than 'take'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ηello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct; when someone learns a new language, can we say that he knows a lot of words but he has to learn how to form? make? a complete sentence(subject- verb- object). Which is the correct verb?

Hello anie2,

The most common verb in this context is 'form', but you could also say 'make'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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