The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello,
Which one of the following is correct. When it is too hot, we use the adjecive the sun is too hot or the sun is too strong?
Thank you in advanced

Hi angie,

I'm afraid I can't give you a very good answer without knowing the context and the meaning that you want to communicate. In general, though, I think either 'strong' or 'hot' are fine.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct;
I would like to know when they are going to visit us and for how long so I can fix my program? or... so I can schedule my program?(my daily program I mean)
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie2,

I think arrange or plan would be the best verbs here, though it's hard to be sure without knowing the full context.

Please note that this isn't really the kind of question we deal with on LearnEnglish. We're happy to help people with questions about English and explain how and why certain structures are correct or not, but we don't function as a proofreading service or checking point for users' commmunications, emails and so on.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

A: Is Alice out of the office today? B: Not to my knowledge, no.

What does "not to my knowledge" mean? someone regards it as "Neither yes nor no, I don't know", someone sees it as "Alice is not out of the office, to my knowledge". It really confuses me, could you clarify? thanks.

Hello sword_yao,

This means that I think Alice is in the office today, but that I'm not completely sure. By saying it I recognise that I don't know if she is in for sure; she could have gone home early or to the doctor, for example. 'not to my knowledge' and 'as far as I know' are both common ways of showing that you don't know enough to be sure.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
i would like to ask which of the following is correct
You have to do your homework? or
You have do your homework?
Thank you in advanced

Hi angie,

'have to do' is used to express obligation, so the first one is correct, not the second one.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask 2 things;
1. When I don't know (at all) a language. I will say I don't know Italian/ Spanish at all, or I do not speak Italian ?
2. Where do use use the word thing?
Thank you in advanced for your valuable help!

Hello,
1.If someone says .I will move to another country. Is it correct to ask:
when did you decide it? or When have you decided it?
Thank you in advanced

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