The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hi there,

'In order that sun would not shine in your face, we have this cover''

Why is the modal verb ''would'' being used in the adverbial clause? Is this correct with this sentence?

Thank you.

Hello JakiGeh,

This sentence doesn't sound correct for several reasons. One is the use of the verb 'would', which as you rightly suspect, is odd, but the phrasing and use of articles is also not natural or even incorrect. We don't generally comment on sentences from other sites for just this reason. In any case, I wouldn't take it as a model.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir,

When I convert compound sentence into report speech, which one is correct?

He teach English and his wife teach music. (Direct)

He told me that he taught English and his wife taught music. (1)
He told me that he taught English and that his wife taught music. (2)

Thanks

Tom11

Hello Tom11,

Both are correct. The first one is a slightly shorter form of the second one, which is the full form. We have a couple of pages on Reported speech that you might want to look at.

By the way, in the direct sentence, the verbs should be 'teaches'!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''If I were training you to do the trick, I would appreciate if you call me ''master'' ''

I believe that the past continuous should be used instead of the present simple in the noun clause but I don't know why. Could you, please, clarify this for me? It is just somehow dependent on the whole structure of the conditional.

Thank you in advance.

Hello JamlMakav,

Are you speaking about the verb 'call'? It should be 'called', because, as you suspect, it is dependent on the whole hypothetical context established by the second conditional structure.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

How about sentences made up of a statement + a question -

Why the Trump presidency happened and what happens next.

Or

Why the Trump presidency happened and what happens next?

And would it make a different if there was an additional clause followed by a colon?

The Trump Presidency: What Happened and What Happens Next ./?

Hello Dom55,

This really depends on the context, but your first sentence, for example, sounds like the title of a newspaper article. If that's the case, then no punctuation is used (neither full stop nor question mark) at the end. I'd say the same is true of a sentence with a colon in it -- it still sounds like a title to me and so I wouldn't punctuate it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks Kirk,

Yes - I was thinking of a title for something like an article. Why do titles not have punctuation?

And if the context were not a title, would that make a difference?

"So, that brings us on to the Trump Presidency. Im going to talk about why it matters and what happens next."

Even though the second clause sounds question asking, is there no question mark because in this case "what" can be read to mean "that which" - ie Im going to talk about that which happens next?

And what that change if the sentence was

"So, that brings us on to the Trump Presidency. Im going to talk about why it matters and ASK what happens next?"

Hello Dom55,

It might help to think of titles as being incomplete thoughts, but in the end, languages are just conventions, i.e. they are the way they are because of the way people use them. In general, we don't use a question mark unless a direct question is being asked. In neither of the examples that you ask about is there a direct question, so you shouldn't use a question mark at the end of them.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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