The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

1)'and the pilots have been taken off duty pending investigation.'

This is the part of a sentence in a news item. What type of construction is this ? ... 'taken off duty pending investigation.' Normal construction is '... as the investigation is pending.'

2)'According to 39-year-old Sharma, who was on an official trip, experience began 5-10 minutes into the flight.'
And what type is this called : '... 5-10 minutes into the flight.'

Normally it is : after 5-10 minutes into the flight.

In sentence 1 above pending an inquiry is a new clause and so should there be no conjunction like 'as' or 'because' to join two clauses.

Thanking you

Regards

Hello dipakrgandhi,

In your example 'pending investigation' is a participle phrase with an adverbial function. It describes the action 'taken off duty'. The meaning is 'until there has been an investigation' or 'while the investigation is carried out'. No conjunction is used here.

 

There are different ways to talk about the time of an action with reference to minutes (hours, days etc). For example, these are all correct:

the experience began 5-10 minutes into the flight

the experience began after 5-10 minutes of the flight

the experience began after 5-10 minutes

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi!About the future, can someone tell me how the aspect of the speaker can often determines which form he or she might use?

Hi Rossella Hino,

We have several pages with detailed information on this.

You can find a summary of ways of talking about future actions on this page.

You can find a discussion of how planned and unplanned events are expressed on this page.

You can find examples of the future continuous and the future perfect forms on this page.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask when we use the following prepositions;
I live on Main Street
I live at Main Street.
2. Which one of the following prepositions are correct in the following case:
Every day I go to school/ work. When I am at school/ work/ the university, I do a lot of work. In this case is the preposition at (school/ work etc) the correct one?
Thank you in advance

Hi anie2,

Could you please ask your question on a relevant page, e.g. prepositional phrases?

Thanks in advance.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask what is the difference between the following prepositions in this case:
I live on Main Street. I live at Main Street.
Let's meet on the Weekend? or at the Weekend?
Thank you in advance

I would like to ask which of the following is correct :

I speak fast or I speak quickly? fast or quickly is correct?
I speak slowly? slowly is the correct word?
Thank you in advance

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct; If we write a letter or email.
1. If we answer an email that someone has sent to us, we say; thank you for your email or thank you for your letter?
2. Is it correct to use the following expression in an email:
Hello, how are you? I hope you are happy and healthy. The sentence I hope you are happy and healthy is it correct to use?
Thank you in advance

Hi anie2,

Could you please ask this question on a relevant page on LearnEnglish? For example, somewhere in our English for Emails section.

Thanks in advance.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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