The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

One last thing. Can I say ' Either Peter or Mark, Michael and George is going to book the tickets.'

Hello Sad,

'Either' is used when there are two options. Thus the sentence tells us that there are two possibilities:

1) Peter is going to book the tickets

or

2) Mark, Michael and George are going to book the tickets

To make the sentence fully grammatical you need to use 'are' rather than 'is' because the verb should agree with the last option in the list.

 

If, on the other hand, you want to suggest one of four possibilities then you should use 'one of' rather that 'either':

One of Peter, Mark, Michael or George is going to book the tickets.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ηello,
I would like to ask if the following questions are correct;
1.Are you busy enough to prepare your meal or dinner?
2.Do you need to eat something both tasty and healthy?
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie2,

There is nothing wrong with either question in terms of grammar or structure. However, the first does not make sense and the second does not sound a natural sentence.

In the first sentence you use the word 'busy' which suggests a lack of time, and yet you use it as if it means the opposite - as if being busy made it possible to prepare a meal. The phrase 'your meal or dinner' is also odd. Dinner is a kind of meal, not an alternative to it.

The second sentence does not sound a natural sentence which would be used in conversation. It sounds more like a rhetorical question used in advertising, and 'want' would be better than 'need', I think.

 

Our role on this site is to help learners with their understanding of English, not to proof-read sentences and correct them. We're happy to explain how things work and explain why something may be wrong, of course, but we generally do not provide a checking/correction service.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask ;
1. If we can say. This square is one of the most well known squares in the city center
2. From this square you can go to many places? or from this square you can go to other places( which are close to the square)
Thank you in advanced

Hi angie,

Yes, your first sentence is correct. The second one is also correct if it is not a question. In other words, 'From this square you can go to many places.' is correct but not if it is a question, in which case it should be 'Can you go to many places from this square?' Your third sentence is also correct, both 'to other places' and 'to other places which are close to the square'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Good afternoon!
Could you answer my question on relative clause: is this sentence a defining relative clause or non-defining "That businessman from Russia who I saw last night is very rich". Do we have to use commas or not? Can we omit "who"?
Thank you in advance!

Hello Daniel157,

The relative clause here tells us which businessman is being referred to and so is a defining relative clause. Without the clause we would say 'A businessman' because the person is not identified/specified. Of course, we have the sentence in isolation here so we have to assume the businessman is not identified earlier in the conversation.

As the clause is a defining relative clause we do not use commas.

The relative pronoun 'who' can be omitted because it is the object of the verb 'saw'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following sentence is correct;
I have done some research on the cost of living of the city
Thank you in advanced

Hello angie2,

The sentence is correct thought I think 'in the city' would be a more common phrase to use in this context.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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