The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello,
Which is correct
1. In Athens , it's pretty hot during summer or In Athens it's pretty hot during the summer?

2,The temperature reaches the 45 celcium? or

The temperature reaches the 45 degrees?

3. When the wind is strong we say today is a windy day?
Can we also say today is a very windy day?

4. When is going to start working?or When does she start working?

Thank you in advanced

Hello anasge,

That's a lot of questions!

I'd say 'in the summer', 'can reach 45 degrees' and either 'is she going to start' or 'does she start'. Yes, you can say 'a windy day' or 'a very windy day'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello
Is it correct if we say :I have been knowing him for ages.
or, I have known him for ages

Hello Adill,

The second sentence is correct. For verbs relating to mental functions we generally do not use continuous forms. These include know, remember, forget, understand and think (though think is also used to mean 'consider' and in this use it can be continuous.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
1.When we ask for someone to write something for the first time(a composition for example) Can we say; As a start you can write a few words describing yourself

2. When we post a weekly diet on the refrigerator for ourselves, and we want to explain that this diet(menu) is something that we are going to cook and not someone else who lives in the house. Can we say ; This is just for me to follow. Is not something that you have to cook.
Is this sentence(expression) correct? or we can say it differently?
Thank you in advanced

Hello anasge,

I think the best ways to express these are as follows:

To start, please write a few words describing yourself.

This is just for me to follow, not something you have to do!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Dear
We get used to using the phrase “the reason behind sth.” Could we use “the reason beneath sth?” Thank you.

Hello tjmanya,

'The reason behind...' is an idiomatic fixed expression and we would not replace 'behind' with 'beneath'. You can say 'the idea behind...' and 'the hope behind...', however.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Please I want to know what the mistake is in this clause
"not before they had agreed on the price the manager asked the secretary to type the contract."

Hello Shaban Nafea,

I'm afraid I'm not completely sure I understand what this sentence is supposed to mean, but I suppose it's 'not before' and the fact that inversion is needed, as well as the word 'than': 'No sooner had they agreed on the price than the manager asked the secretary to type up the contract.'

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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