The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello JakiGeh,

You're welcome!

That's good thinking, but no, the past simple doesn't have an unreal meaning in this case. 'It's time we stopped' is a way of suggesting they stop or asking for them to stop.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''Some of the information has already been analysed''

''One of my teachers is Polish''

Why does the first sentence take the singular verb form? The second takes singular as it's supposed to since ''one'' is the subject of the sentence.

Thank you

Hello JamiMakav,

'Information' is an uncount noun in English and is therefore always singular. 'Teacher' is a count noun and so can be plural (as in the example).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

The second sentence's subject is ''one''; therefore the singular verb is used, but the first sentence has ''some'' as a subject and the plural verb is used probably due to ''information'' that is uncountable, as you've said, and thus some information is still uncountable. Did I understand it correctly?

Once again, thank you

Hello JamiMakav,

The subject of the sentence is not only 'Some' but the whole noun phrase 'Some of the information'. As I said, 'information' is an uncount noun and so always has a singular verb:

All of the information is

Most of the information is

Some of the information is

None of the information is

 

The only times we use a plural verb is when we use a phrase such as 'pieces of':

Some pieces of information are hidden

 

You can read more about this subject on this page.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi everyone, i need somebody help me, how to learn grammar from the phrases?
for example (wherever you live in the world), where the grammar in this sentence

Hello waleed mansi,

Grammar is how words are put together and how they change to construct meaning. It's great to try to learn grammar from sentences that you find, but it's probably best to have a teacher if you want to do that. You might want to look into a British Council class in Egypt to see if there's a relevant class.

If that doesn't suit you, you could work your way through this English Grammar section, though it's really organised as a reference rather than a course. You can also learn a lot of grammar from our Elementary Podcasts, which are very popular and which also cover some aspects of grammar.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there,
Will/can you pass me the salt?
What is the difference between these sentences?
Shall/should I call him tomorrow?
What shall/should we do with this?
Should is used when suggesting and advising something. What is the difference between the sentences and Is ''shall'' only used when asking for advise or suggestion, not negative or positive sentences?

Thank you in advance

Many thanks

Hello JakiGeh,

If you're sitting at the table eating, there is no difference between 'can' or 'will'. Both are used for requests, as is explained on the page I've linked to.

'shall' and 'should' both have several uses, and what they mean exactly depends on context. There's no context for your sentences, but, for example, 'shall I call him' can be an indirect way of offering to call. 'should I call him' can also have the same meaning. Both can also be requests for someone's opinion on the idea, i.e. their advice.

'shall' is used only in limited situations -- typically, only in questions.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

What is the difference between ''will'' and present simple when expressing a general truth? For example,

''A baby will recognize its mother's voice soon after the it's born''
''A baby recognizes its mother's voice soon after the it's born''

Could a difference be seen just when you have a context?

And what is the difference between these two?

''I will have been working for 20 years in this September''
''I am going to have been working for 20 years in this September''

I know the second sentence is rear, but I'd still like to know the difference.

Thank you very much.

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