The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Section: 

Comments

Hello JamlMakav,

It certainly is possible and that sentence is a good example.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello
01.There are two people there.
02.There are two many people there.

which is the correct one ( without many and with many ?)

Hello raj jk,

The first sentence is correct. We do not use 'two many' so the second sentence is incorrect.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Do you mean that many is only used with asking question?such as
How many coins are there
How many students are there?
but what about countable non countable grammar rule? countable - many, uncountable- much

Hello raj jk,

No, that is not what I said. I said only that 'two many' is not used. You can use a number ('two') or a quantifier ('many', 'a lot of', 'some') but you cannot use both together. It is possible to say 'too many', but that is not a number even though the pronunciation is the same.

'Many' is more common in questions than affirmative sentences but it can be used in either.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''The road was measured to be 100 foot long''

I believe that this construction(to be...) kind of shows uncertainty or approximation. Am I right? We could only say ''The road was 100 feet long''

Thank you

Hello JakiGeh,

It's difficult to say without knowing the full context, but it doesn't necessarily show approximation. If we reduce it to its simplest components, yes, it would mean that the road was 100 feet long.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello!
in our country when teacher came to a class and going to teach, first of all they greet the children. In English language I know this greeting, hello, stand up children welcome good morning sit down! I learned this when I was going to school. but I want to know how it happens in England what about get up and rise ? what is more polite one?

Hello raj jk,

I think the way the children greet their teacher varies from school to school. Some are more formal and others less son. However, in my experience in those schools where the children stand they are not told to do so by the teacher but rather understand this as a normal action without a particular instruction from the teacher.

A typical start to the lesson would be:

[teacher enters, children stand]

Teacher: Good morning, class/everyone.

Children: Good morning, Mr. Smith.

Teacher: Sit down, please.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Pages