The structure of the clause depends on the verb. For example:

  • An intransitive verb has the structure: N(=noun) + V(=verb): (John) + (smiled).
  • A transitive verb has the structure: N + V + N: (We) + (had been playing) + (football)
  • A link verb has the structure: N + V + Adj : (She) + (looked) + (happy)
  • A phrasal verb has the structure: N + V + p + N (She) + (gave) +(back) + (the money)
    or
    N + V + N + p (She) + (gave) + (the money) + (back)

 Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Dear Sir
Please help me regarding the following.
It is me/him.(accepted correct if not please correct it)
If I want to change the above to plural for example I want to use the object pronoun 'them' instead of me/him how I am going to write it.
Please help!
Thank you.
Andrew international

Hello Andrew international,

The correct form would be

It is them.

The only context in which we would use this would be when the identity of a group surprises us. For example, if we saw a group of people who we did not expect to see and exclaimed 'It's them!' in the sense of 'Look who it is!'

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

What does P stand for

Hello Arsalan.Pakistani,

The abbreviation 'P' stands for 'preposition'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

''I'll wait for you until you've finished cleaning''
In this case, the subordinate clause ends first and then the main follows.

I often find this kind of structures. For example,
A main clause has a future tense and a subordinate has present perfect. Therefore, the subordinate clause happens first. For instance, ''I will make sure that you have played hokey and been in Paris''

My question is: Would it be the same if I used future unreal in a main clause?

''It would be strange to see what Jack's played''

''I wouldn't want somebody pointing to all the mistakes I've made''

What will be different if past simple is used instead?

Than you.

Hello JamlMakav,

The rules for tense use here follow normal use - i.e. they are used according to the action being described. You can use past simple if the event is a completed past event, just as in any other sentence:

I wouldn't want somebody pointing to all the mistakes I've made.

This describes the mistakes made in the speaker's life up to the moment of speaking - unfinished past time.

I wouldn't want somebody pointing to all the mistakes I made,

This describes the mistakes made in the speaker's life in a particular past time period (last week, when he/she was a child etc) - finished past time.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you very much

Hi,

Can I use either "be quiet" or the verb "silence" if I want to tell someone off from making noise ? Ie. "Be quiet or you will wake the kids" or "silence or you will wake the kid "? Which one is the right way to say it as I don't know the difference between these two

Also: Can I say : Mind what you are doing" or " Look out for what you are doing " if I want to warn someone?

Thank you.

Hello Widescreen,

'be quiet' is more common in informal speaking -- I say 'be quiet or you'll wake your brother and sister' several times a week to my oldest son! You can also say 'Silence!' to ask someone to be quiet, but it's usually used in a school context or in a context where you have more authority than the person who you're saying it, so it's not as widely appropriate as 'be quiet'.

'Mind what you're doing' is indeed correct. Anyone would understand your sentence with 'look out', but usually 'look out for' is followed by a noun phrase or a separate sentence, not a clause (as in your example). You can see examples of this in the dictionary entry for 'look out'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi peter

could you tell me any have lesson for using "after"

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