Transitive verbs have a noun phrase as object:

 

Noun phrase (Subject) Verb phrase Noun phrase (Object)
John
We
Some of the children
wanted
had been playing
are learning
a new bicycle.
football.
English.

This pattern is N + V + N (noun + verb + noun).

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

hi
what does the way mean?
they are way too busy
they came way too late

Hello chris kim,

In this context 'way too' means 'much too' or 'far too'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hi
what is the difference between get and be in making passive sentences ?
would mind telling me the meaning of these verbs? get behind get around
i do not want to get behind on my payment
maybe there is way to get around that problem
what is the difference between used to and would in the sentences about past?

hi there
what is the meaning of get in these sentences
i never get to see him
i never get to go away on holidays

Hi chris kim,

The meaning here is something like 'never have the chance/opportunity/possibility to' do each thing.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello kavita mitter,

'Dropped' here is a transitive verb with a direct object ('the ring').

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there, What is the difference between John smiled and John is smiling and which one is correct. How could I make differentiate between the adjectives ending with ed and the verbs in the past tense

Hi Dragon2010,

You have two different tenses there, referring to different times. 'John smiled' is an example of the past simple, which we use to talk about completed events or states in the past - look here for more information on this. 'John is smiling' is an example of the present continuous, which we use to talk about events in progress at the time of speaking - look here for more information.

As far as your other question goes, if we do not know the particular form then we distinguish using the context, which should make it clear whether the word is an adjective or a verb.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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