Some verbs have the pattern N + V + to+infinitive:

They agreed to help.
We decided to go.

Some verbs have the pattern N + V + N + to+infinitive:

She told him to go home.
They advised us to wait.

Note: we suggest that you read about Verbs with -ing forms before doing this activity.

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

I still have some concerns with having both gerunds and infinitives in a sentence, are these grammatical correct, " he's playing with fire that's going to burn him" and "she's begging me to buy her a car" and " I want to tell him to start preparing to play at Wembley this evening. " thanks

Hello Timmosky,

Yes, those are all correct.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

When talking about past events, which is the best way to describe actions between these two sentences. " thieves came to rob in our neighbourhood two years ago" or " thieves came and robbed in our neighbourhood two years ago." Which is more appropriate

Hello Timmosky,

'rob' is usually followed by an indirect object, in other words, the person or place that suffers from the robbery, and not by a direct object, i.e. the thing that is taken. So although your sentence is perfectly intelligible, it would be better to say 'thieves came and robbed many of my neighbours two years ago'. Actually, I might suggest the word 'burgle', which is used specifically for robberies in which homes are the victim: 'Many houses were burgled in our neighbourhood two years ago'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, teachers. I want to ask if more than one infinitive can be used in a sentence. E.g., "while going to her house yesterday, I got lost and I had to ask for directions to get therethere." And " I want to go to sleep." Thanks

Hi TIm,

It's perfectly fine to use two infinitives in one sentence. Why would it not be? For example:

I went to the house to try to talk with her.

 

The phrase 'to go to sleep' has only one infinitive. The second 'to' is a preposition, as you can see by comparing it to phrases like 'from sleep', 'during sleep' etc.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Merry Christmas guys! I want to ask if it's grammatical to use an infinitive before a gerund in a sentence: "i will like to start training as soon as possible." and "I'd love to give teaching a chance." thanks

Hello Timmosky,

Your sentences are grammatically correct, so yes, it is possible, though really it depends on the verbs and structures at hand. In other words, 'start' can be following by an -ing form, as well as 'give'. The same is not true of all verbs, nor is it always true of these two verbs.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you as well!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Can a gerund and infinitive be together in a single sentence? E.g., " it's disheartening to see him suffer like that" or "To see him suffer like that is disheartening."

Hello Timmosky,

Yes, there is no problem at all with that. Both of your example sentences are correct, though note that it is much more common to use a gerund in subject position than an infinitive, especially in informal contexts -- so the second would more often be expressed as 'Seeing him suffer like that is disheartening' (or as it is in your first sentence).

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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