Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello naaka,

No, 'doing' cannot be replaced by 'do' here. 'doing' is a gerund, i.e. a verbal noun, and is the complement of the first part of the sentence. 'do' is not used as a noun and so it would not be grammatically correct.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello kirk,

But I have seen sentences like this. "All you have to do is click the right button..." I think this one also similar to my previous question. But here we use 'click' instead of 'clicking'. Could you explain this for me?

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

The reason we use do in this sentence is that it is a continuation of 'have to', but the 'to' is missed out to avoid repetition. It's easier to see if we add the 'to':

All you have to do is to click the right button...

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Hello, I just join this group. Please can anyone tell me whether following sentence is true or not
Students find networking is essential to finding the right job.
what is the difference if we delete is ?
Thanks in advance

Hello Abo Fadak,

It is fine to omit 'is' in this sentence; both are correct and the meaning is the same. We would say 'to find' rather than 'to finding', however.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello peter,

I found this a bit strange.How do we omit 'is'? I was amazing if u can give example sentence for this.

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

If we omit 'is' then the construction here is 'find something + adjective', which is quite a common construction:

I found that film amazing, didn't you?

I always find his lessons boring, I'm afraid.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello sir I am Pakistan...I want to ask how we will translate these different forms of a sentence

1.men ne aapka kaam kiya.
3.men aapka kaam nahi ker skta.
4.men aapka kam na ker saka.
5.men aap ka kaam nahi ker skta tha.
6.men aap ka kaam nahi ker sakoon ga.
7.wo aap ka kaam ker skta ho ga

Hello waqar_ahmad,

I'm afraid we don't offer a translation service here on LearnEnglish. Our main focus is on the learning materials we provide; we are not online teachers or language consultants.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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