Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

According to Cambridge Dictionary pretty means not extremely and keen means extreme or strong. I cannot comprehend the below sentence meaning:

We are pretty keen cyclists.

Dear Sir,
With respect to the clause structure, can you please tell me whether my answer is right or not?

As a 72-hour truce mediated by Egypt took hold, Israel said it had withdrawn its forces from Gaza and Hamas said it would engage in talks on a lasting peace agreement.

In the above sentence, "As a 72-hour truce mediated by Egypt took hold" - is the subject of the sentence. Am I right sir?

Hello saipathudut,

No, 'as' is a subordinating conjunction that introduces a dependent adverbial clause, which here indicates the time. Note that you could move this clause to the end of the sentence (after 'peace agreement'), and the sentence would mean the same thing. If you can move a clause without changing the meaning, that's generally a sign that it is not the subject of the sentence.

The sentence has two main subjects: 'Israel' and 'Hamas'. To find the main subjects, look for the main verbs ('said' and 'said'). This is not always so easy, but with some practice should get easier.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Someone pls suggest if I am right in identifying the clauses in bracketed parts of below statements

1. He reached the place [when the sun had set.] Adverbial clause
2. [If you can do it fast], please do so Adverbial clause
3. The table [which has a broken leg] is from the staff room Adjective Clause
4. He expects [that he would get through the examination Noun Clause
5. He is very rich. Yet he is unhappy Adjective Clause
6. Although he is an industrious student, he failed in the examination] Adjective Clause
7. The children clapped [as the clown entered the ring] Adverbial Clause
8. People started running out [as soon as the accident took place] Adverbial Clause
9. Please answer the call for me [in case I go out] Adjective Clause

Hello Koundinya,

I have answered your other question on this subject (here). Please note that our role here on LearnEnglish is primarily to help users with the material here on the site and, while we are happy to help learners with more general questions about English, we cannot really answer whole rafts of questions which resemble test or homework exercises. A question about an individual example or structure is one thing, but we really do not have the time to deal with something like this.

I hope my answer to your other question helps you with your task above.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

[Because you have done this], you must explain it.

Can someone explain on the clause written brackets if it is a noun/ adjective/ adverb clause and why

Hello Koundinya,

'Because' here is a conjunction and it introduces a dependent adverb clause which gives us more information about the main part of the sentence - here, it tells us the reason why the person must provide an explanation.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sometimes we forget to close those doors that we left behind open which usually control us to embrace the newly open door which usually gives us the opportunity to move on and make us to a better person we are. So if we are brave enough to accept wholeheartedly the change that the newly open door offers to us, step backward turn about and shut those doors that weaken us to embrace possibilities.

Please do check if it is correct grammatically

Hi Jay Ar,

I'm afraid that we don't provide corrections of users' texts. If there's a specific phrase or even sentence you have a question about, you're welcome to ask about it, explaining where you are uncertain, but we are simply too small a team with too much work to be able to correct texts such as this one.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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