The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Sometimes I read sentences starting with "given that" ;however,I could not understand what"given that" means and what meaning the sentence will get if we start it with "Given that".

Hello Rox4090,

You can check the meaning of words and phrases in our online dictionary. Just type 'given' into the search window and click 'Look it up!'

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I got it.Now, lets's see if I can get it right.

1.Given that you have advised me to look meaning of words in an English dictionary, I am likely to find all the meanings required for my subject.

Is it correct?

Hello Rox4090,

It's not the most natural context, but it's OK.

'Given' is usually used to mean 'accepting that' rather than 'since' or 'because'.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Please help me to choose the best answer.
My children were alone only 2 hours , but it was enough to make ... the whole house.
a)upside down b)up and down

Hello niknikouzbek,

Neither of these woul dmake a correct sentence.

We do not answer such questions as a rule. Our role here is to help users with the material on our site, not other sites or from homework exercises or similar.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

"I'm at university studying engineering." Can we say this sentence like this: "I'm at university which is studying engineering."

"The British chambers of commerce has launched a new website (designed) to support business."
Here "designed" is a verb or a adjective and can we say it "a new website which is/was designed to........"

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

If you use 'which' in that sentence then it sounds like the university is studying, not you, so the answer is 'no'. The sentence does not have a relative clause; it is an example of ellipsis, where repeated information is missed out to make the sentence simpler:

I'm at university [and I'm] studying engineering.

The second sentence can be rewritten as you suggest. It is an example of a reduced relative clause.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter,

Thank you for your help. First one is okay but in the second one I have a doubt. If it is relative clause it should be in "ing" form. 'a new website designing to support......"
Could you explain this one.

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

It is fine to use -ed (the past participle) in a reduced relative clause. It has a passive meaning, which is appropriate here: the website was designed (by someone) to support...

You can read more about this on this page.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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