Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello uthirapathi,

It's very hard to answer this question because the construction of English sentences is very flexible and there are often options for the speaker. The most basic sequence is subject-verb-object, but this is not a rule but rather a common pattern. Did you have any specific sentences in mind? If so, we can comment on those sentences and help you to understand why they are constructed as they are, but we can't really give general rules which cover all sentences as there are no such general rules.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

can you please explain the meaning of this sentence
"the king turned a deaf ear to his entreaties"

Thanks and regards

Hello sanjus,

Both the phrase 'turn a deaf ear' and the word 'entreaties' are in our dictionary (see the search box on the lower right). If it's still not clear after you look them up, please let us know.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

Tell me plz what are the meaning of below ones.

As well as, as much as, as soon as????

Give me a clear definition plz....

tharindu

Hi Tharindu,

All three of these are in our dictionary. I'd suggest you take a look there (the search box is on the lower right) and then if you have any more questions, please don't hesitate to ask them - the more specific, the better.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

dear sir i am confused with objects in sentence,i could't find exact object in a sentences if their two objects how to find the object 1 and object 2

Hello suragonisunil,

I'm not sure I can really discuss this in such an abstract way. Perhaps you could provide an example sentence which you find confusing and we'll be happy to explain it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, can you help me with these phrases?

1-That friend of yours did it

2-Two of Peter's friends are playing

In the first clause i know "friend" is the HEAD of the NP, with "That" being a PRE-MODIFIER, but i want to ask you about the classification of "Of yours" is it a "POST-MODIFIER"? and also is it a "Prepositional phrase"? i'm a little confused about that "Of".

And in the second, which is the HEAD of the NP, is it maybe "Peter's" (i know Genitives can be the HEAD of a noun pharse, so, is this the case?).

I hope you can help me, thanks in advance and greetings from Chile.

Hi chileanenglishlearner,

It's great that you want to parse these sentences like this, but I'm afraid this isn't something that we can help you with. We are focused on helping people use the website and to learn to use English without going into such detail.

I'm sorry, and wish you the best!

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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