Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello shadyar,

The 's in let's go is a contracted form of us, so these two phrases have the same meaning. Let us go, however, is not used in colloquial speech or any but the most formal or ritualized contexts. Let's go, in contrast, is quite common in many situations.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
It happened by chance to see my son's English exam paper. I recognized the following question strange both in the stem and the choices.
Question: My parents gone to the U.S. on-----------?
1-vacation 2- holiday 3- trip 4- foot
In the stem the word "gone" seems incorrect grammatically. I think "My parents have been in the U.A …" seems reasonable. Furthermore it seems both choices vacation and holiday are correct. What is your idea? which choice is corret.
My next question is can we use the preposition "on" for trip and say" I was on a trip".
thanks

Hello shadyar,

This sentence with just 'gone' as the verb form is indeed not grammatical; perhaps the word 'have' (making the verb 'have gone') was left out by mistake. The preposition 'on' could be used with options 1, 2 and 4, and, as you ask, even 3 if it were 'a trip' (instead of 'trip'). Perhaps the exercise was to find the one incorrect answer.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Does with in " Jack will fight with John" mean that Jack will fight against John, or He will fight on his side against someone else?

Thanks in advance

Hi zagrus,

'fight with someone' is ambiguous in English - it could mean that Jack is fighting against John, or it could mean the two are helping each other to fight someone or something else. Normally, it should be clear from context, or, if you're writing, you could express it in a different way, e.g. using 'against' instead of 'with' or some other expression.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Sirs,

As I have finished a test of grammar, and obtained the "correct answer" showing that I got it wrong, I would like to ask whether my answer was correct or not. The quiz is listed below:

36. Aspirin can be poisonous when ____ in excessive amounts.
(1) taken (2) taking (3) is taken (4) to be taken

The correct answer is said to be (1) taken.
However, I'd suggest (2) taking is more appropriate and correct.

Would anyone please clarify the confusion of mine, and perhaps support my answer if it was the correct option? By the way, as it is possible to offer the debate to fight for extra points before 6:00PM in Taiwan, this request is pretty urgent. Dreadfully sorry if causing any inconvenience, but I'd appreciate greatly for those who answered in time.

Thank you all in advance.

B.R.
Emerald Zeng from Taiwan

Hello EmeraldZ,

The correct answer was indeed 'taken'. It might help to think of 'when taken' as an abbreviated form of 'when it is taken'.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sirs.
I ask your help to clarify several expressions.
Is this sentence correct?
John was capable of raising this question at the meeting.
or
John was able to raise this question at the meeting.
Thank you beforehand.
Best wishes.

Hello Sir,
Regarding the sentence given below,
'Parents are the ones they think they can confide in,and who they think of as their haven.'
Is this sentence correct ;especially the latter half.Does it sound right.If not could you please suggest a better expression.

Thankyou.

Dear Sir

According to Cambridge Dictionary pretty means not extremely and keen means extreme or strong. I cannot comprehend the below sentence meaning:

We are pretty keen cyclists.

Could you describe the meaning of above sentence, by any chance?

Thanks
MEH

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