The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Section: 

Comments

Hello naaka,

We can use 'alone' to describe a noun or a gerund and it always follows the word. Here 'talk' looks like a verb but is actually a noun with a similar meaning to 'speech' or 'words'. We could say 'not speech alone' or 'not words alone', for example.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

What should be used before ‘his’ in this line- ‘to’ or ‘in’

Despite mobilising peasants in large number in his movement Gandhi failed to address the core issues of Peasants in India.

Hello amit.underdog,

The correct preposition here would be 'in'. However, the sentence has a mistake: it should be 'in large numbers'.

You could also use an infinitive: '...in large numbers to join his movement...'

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Are you exactly referring to the preposition 'in' used before his or 'in' used before 'large number'?

Hello amit.underdog,

Yes, Peter was referring to the preposition 'in' in the prepositional phrase 'in his movement'. You can mobilise people to do something (e.g. 'to join his movement'), but generally 'to' is not used as a preposition to indicate destination, as 'mobilise' isn't really about movement in a direction as much as it is a call to action in general.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I was asking about what preposition should be used before 'his' in that line.

Hello, Could you help me please? I do not know the difference between these two sentences:
If I had won the competition, I would have a great job now.
If I had won the competition, I would have had a great job.
Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

These are examples of conditional sentences describing unreal past situations - in both sentences the speaker did not win the competition and is thinking about the result if they had won.

The difference between the sentences is in the second part - the result clause. In the first sentence the result is in the present. In the second sentence the result is in the past.

The name for these kinds of conditionals is third conditional (the first sentence) and mixed conditional (the second sentence. You can read more about conditional forms on these pages:

here

here

here

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I just want to ask one more question. Can I write after unreal conditional real conditional, and vice versa?

If I had won the lottery(past unreal conditional), I would be rich(present unreal conditional).
If I had won the lottery(past unreal conditional), I will be rich (present real conditional).

I have read that we mix just unreal conditionals (first sentence). I do not know about real conditionals(second sentence).

Thank you Peter M.

Hello MCWSL,

No, you cannot mix unreal and real conditionals. The conditional and result clauses of conditionals must be consistent in terms of being real or unreal. Mixed conditionals are mixed in terms of time reference, so where a first, second or third conditional has a consistent time reference (i.e. the same time reference in each half), a mixed conditional has two time references (past condition - future result, for example).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Tea

Pages