The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Section: 

Comments

Hello EagerLearner,

Yes, that sentence is correct. It uses an if-clause, and you can learn more about the structure of this sentence on this page.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Where to use comma? I am in habit of using that on and the off what to do in order to overlook this "over-generalization"?

Hello Dr. Faustus,

I'm afraid this is a very general question and we can't provide the kind of long answer that is required. There are many websites which will give you this information, but remember that the genre and style is important - there are different expectations for different contexts. For formal and/or academic work, this is a good starting place:

The Oxford Style Guide

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
I wonder whether the use of the gaping comma in the following sentence is correct:

The USA and China are the largest emitters of greenhouse gases while Switzerland, the smallest.

Regards,
Abdullah

Hi zagrus,

You need to add 'is' after 'Switzerland' for the sentence to be correct.

A comma before 'the smallest' is not correct. In fact, there are no commas needed in this sentence. You could add a comma before 'while' if you wish, but this is a question of style.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,The Respected LearnEnglish Team
I am a new member, I registered the examination before one week, I tried many times to get from the site videos and tutorial lessons explaining all 4 skills of the English specifically speaking and writing but If I am not wrong the material are fragmented and videos is very limited in this site.
Kindly please advise me to get complete material about all four skills or its necessary to subscribe road to IELTS and pay

Thanks......... Yousuf Abdirahman

Hello Nurhrg,

LearnEnglish is designed for learners with a more general interest. I'd suggest you consult TakeIELTS, which is dedicated completely to the exam and where you can find lots of useful information, advice and even some free practice materials.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi sir,

i want to know,there is any study material difference between English grammar & quick grammar and which vest method to remember rule of English grammar.

thank.

em

Hello yogesh,

The explanations are a little different and the two sections are organised differently, but both are equally good. I'd suggest you explore both and use the one you like best.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, I have a question regarding capital letter, please. Should I start with capital letter after the question mark?
For example, "why do you waste your time? Don'tyouhaveanything to do?" Or "why do you waste your time? don'tyouhaveanything to do?"
My teacher wrote a note on my paper to watch the cap while the grammar check when I use the word processor correct it to me with cap.
Thank you

Pages