Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,

'I learn some new English words from rap music but I think some of them are words I can't say in the classroom'. I found this sentence a bit strange.They use 'some of them are words I can't say in the classroom.'What about if we omit 'words' here? 'some of them are I can't say in the classroom.' Or we must use 'that' between 'are' and 'words'.

Could you help me with this.

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

There are different ways that you could omit words from this sentence, but what you suggest is not correct - you'd have to omit 'are' as well. Here are a couple of ways you could do this (words in parentheses can be omitted):

'I learn some new English words from rap music but I think some (of them) are words I can't say in the classroom'.

'I learn some new English words from rap music but I think some (of them are words) I can't say in the classroom'.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

'Cats make me sneeze'. Here there are two verbs, make and sneeze. 'You make me happy.' Here only one verb.How do you explain this for me.

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

Almost every word in any language can be used in more than one way. Here, you can see two very common uses of 'make', both with a causative meaning. The first is followed by an object plus a bare infinitive, and the second is followed by an object plus an adjective.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

"I will go to the wash room.wait till I come back." I want to say this in one sentence.Is there any way to say it?

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

There are many ways you could do this (e.g. with a semi-colon (;) or dash (-)) instead of a full stop, but a full stop (.) is what I would use here.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Kirk,

Extremely sorry for disturbing you again. You mean we can use this sentence with any method you mentioned.I mean could we use a semi-colon or dash in the same position we used full stop.

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

That's OK - and yes, I meant you can also write it with a semi-colon or dash in the same position as the full stop. Some might not like the dash, especially in a formal text, but dashes are used quite commonly nowadays.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Heelo,

"The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do." The question that I have is can we use 'do' after "is" here? And also is it correct use "doing" as well?

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

No, 'doing' cannot be replaced by 'do' here. 'doing' is a gerund, i.e. a verbal noun, and is the complement of the first part of the sentence. 'do' is not used as a noun and so it would not be grammatically correct.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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