The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello Khansaakhan,

'to' is a preposition here, and verbs that follow prepositions go in the -ing form – that's why this sentence is written the way it is.

As you can see the word 'to' can be a bit tricky, because sometimes it is part of an infinitive (e.g. 'I want to drink some tea') and sometimes a preposition (e.g. 'I look forward to drinking some tea'). There is no easy way to know which form it is – it is something you have to learn. Therefore I'd suggest you make a list of phrases in which 'to' is a preposition, as you now have the first item on that list: 'looking forward to doing something'. Another one is 'to be/get used to doing something'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello.please explain me whether this sentence is true?
In the1800s industrial expansion was greatest in the north،as was the development of the railroad systems.
If this is true please tell me the role of "as"here.
with best regards

Hello rastak keen,

If you look up 'as' in the Cambridge Dictionary (in the grey box on the right side of this page), the third entry – conjunction (BECAUSE) – explains what 'as' means in this sentence.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for your help.But the second part of this sentence (after as) does not have any subject.Is it true?can you explain it for me?
with sincere thanks.

Hello rastak,

I'm sorry, you're right! I got distracted by what I read in the dictionary – sorry about that. The meaning used here is as conjunction (LIKE). In other words, the development of the railroads, just like industrial expansion, was greatest in the north.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi
what is the meaning of through here?
charlie is someone i grew up with we have been through a lot together

Hello chris kim,

This is part of the phrasal verb 'go through', which you can find in the dictionary as 'go through sth'. It basically means to experience or live through a situation or situations, often difficult situations, though not exclusively.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
What's the meaning of hate here. i hate to ask this but would mind helping me

Hello chris kim,

This is a way of saying that you don't want to ask for help, but that you need to.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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