Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

hello sir,
please, deliver some lectures on direct and indirect narration

Hi imran mughal,

Please see our Reported speech 1 page. Note that in the Grammar Support box in the column on the right, there are links to other related pages.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
The words" historic " and "historical" are adj.I don't know their differences.For example, do historic places and historical places have the same meaning?
Thank You

Hello shadyar,

You can find the answer to this, and to other vocabulary questions, by using our dictionary facility. Just type each word into the search window on the right and click 'Look it up!' to see a definition and examples.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi all,
what does the word assertive means in each of the following sentences,

1. Norman Powell was assertive(confident), but he was the only one who displayed point-scoring ability.

2. it is a significant development and I think it encourages the Europeans to also look to take more assertive (firm) steps to revive their economies.

3. Let’s not forget that Russia has been much more militarily assertive (forcefull) in recent times, he said on Thursday.

4. Nonetheless, Popovich is exploiting an ambiguity on the rest issue that the N.B.A., in conjunction with an assertive Roberts, should clarify.

5.They’re very assertive(commanding), if not aggressive leaders, who state clearly what they’re going to do, he said of his former bosses.

I have guessed some meaning is these correct

Thanks and regards

Hello sanjus,

It looks like you've understood these sentences based on the words you've put in parentheses. In 4, I'd say 'assertive' means 'firm' and/or 'confident' - the entire context would tell this.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello kirk,
Thank you for reply.So the sentence "I was on a trip" is right meaningfully and grammatically.
Best Wishes

Hello everybody,
I need to find the answer to the question, concerning vacation and holiday, I put on 1 Nov immediately. Everybody who knows the answer please does it. It is an emergency.
Thank you very much.

Hello shadyar,

As far as I can see your question has already been answered by Kirk.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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