The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello
I was caught out today with a make the question task.
Complete this question
'What kind of _____ he ______?'
for this answer
'He's going to make a chocolate cake.'
The question is
'What kind of cake is he going to make?'
My students asked me why it is not cakes. I think because the answer is a single a chocolate cake. Without the answer given is it grammatically correct to say 'What kind of cakes is he going to make? and when?
Thanks
Andrea

Hi Andrea,

There's a lot of variation with 'kind of'. In a formal style, 'kind of cake' or 'kinds of cakes' are probably the best, but I'm sure that you could find plenty of examples in print or of people saying 'kinds of cake' or 'kind of cakes'. If you do an internet search for "kind of vs kinds of", you'll see plenty of discussions of this and related topics, e.g. this archived BBC page.

Consider also that 'cake' can be used as both a count and uncount noun. Your students might be thinking of it as a count noun, whereas you're thinking of it as uncount. That could be an interesting teaching point in itself!

I hope this helps you!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Kirk
Thanks for the reply, very useful. I'm glad that I was not as off the mark as I thought as it appears to be a 'grey' area.
I'll pass this response on to my students.
kind regards
Andrea.

Hello i have some doubts with the following sentence : The food is tasty but also healthy as well.
In my opinion the sentence should read : The food is tasty as well as healthy or The food is tasty but healthy as well

Hello Lamastry,

While the first sentence is not grammatically incorrect I agree that your first version is better. I would also suggest that 'and' is a better option that 'but' here as both adjectives ('tasty' and 'healthy') are positive and so there is no contrast between them.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Thank you for the reply Is it possible to use ALSO and AS WELL in the same sentence

Hello Lamastry,

That depends on the sentence. In the same sentence they would perhaps be repetitive, but that is a rhetorical device that the speaker may want to use. If you have a particular example in mind then we can comment on it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
Which one is correct?
1.How many pages you can print?
2. How many pages can you print?

Hello Shelkesuraj,

The second one is correct. In a question the modal verb (can) and the subject (you) are inverted.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Kirk, I have to go bazar, I have taken the list of the iteam to be bought with myself. you should clean the guest roon and receive the guest. i'll be back in two hours
how can this question appear into my exams i mean in what way? will they ask to correct the grammer or how many types they are?

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