Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hi Thari,

It means that, given a choice between drinking red or white wine, this person would choose red. Red wine tastes better to this person than white.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Thari,

The correct expression is to go on a trip: I went on a trip on 21st May.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

HI,

How do i make questions about trip? And below question are correct or wrong?

1 Where do we go?
2 What day are we going to go?
3 Do we travel by train?
4 What time do we come back?

if the sentences are incorrect please write correct one.

Thari.

Hello Thari,

How we say things can change a lot depending on the context, but in general, sentences 1, 3 and 4 are not correct - the following sentences are my corrections:

1. Where are we going?
2. (correct)
3. Are we traveling (or: going to travel) by train?
4. What time are we coming (or: going to come) back?

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sirs.
Please check the following sentence.In a contemporaneous time human beings are used to living in conviniences.Is it right "in a contemporaneous time"?I want to substitute "nowadays" by using this expression.
Thank you beforehand.

Hello Kamran Ibragimov,

'Contemporaneous' means 'existing at or occurring in the same period', which is not the same meaning as 'nowadays'  I think the word you are looking for is 'comtemporary', but the sentence needs a couple of other tweaks as well as this:

In contemporary times human beings are used to living with (modern) conveniences.

This is my best guess for what you want to say, although without seeing the context it is hard for me to be certain.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Answer the following question

1) Fill in the gao with correct form of verb
By this time tomorrow he___________home
A)reach B)will have reached C)will reach D)will have reach

2)choose most suitable preposition
He was indignant ____me
A)at B)with C) for D)of

3)In 2001,_____a teacher?
A)did you be B)was you C) you was D) were you

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