Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

dear sir i am confused with objects in sentence,i could't find exact object in a sentences if their two objects how to find the object 1 and object 2

Hello suragonisunil,

I'm not sure I can really discuss this in such an abstract way. Perhaps you could provide an example sentence which you find confusing and we'll be happy to explain it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, can you help me with these phrases?

1-That friend of yours did it

2-Two of Peter's friends are playing

In the first clause i know "friend" is the HEAD of the NP, with "That" being a PRE-MODIFIER, but i want to ask you about the classification of "Of yours" is it a "POST-MODIFIER"? and also is it a "Prepositional phrase"? i'm a little confused about that "Of".

And in the second, which is the HEAD of the NP, is it maybe "Peter's" (i know Genitives can be the HEAD of a noun pharse, so, is this the case?).

I hope you can help me, thanks in advance and greetings from Chile.

Hi chileanenglishlearner,

It's great that you want to parse these sentences like this, but I'm afraid this isn't something that we can help you with. We are focused on helping people use the website and to learn to use English without going into such detail.

I'm sorry, and wish you the best!

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Why on earth do you use the expression "wanna"??? I see people using it in their questions
possibly not realizing it is not an actual word.
Thanks

Hello sab2525,

I would not say that 'wanna' is not a word.  It may not be a part of standard usage, or be characterised as slang, but it is a word that is quite commonly used in certain contexts.  Language is context-dependent, and what is normal or acceptable in one context (such as an internet chatroom) is different from what is normal or acceptable in another (such as a formal discussion or debate).  In the context of an internet comments section I think 'wanna' is an acceptable non-standard form.  I expect that our users are quite aware that 'wanna' is a non-standard version of 'want to', and would not use it in an innapropriate formal context.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Well, you are supposed to be teaching correct English. You"expect" that your users are "quite aware"...?
Then take a look at the comment directly below mine; it seems not. It doesn't help beginners to start them off with sloppy English. After all you ARE working for the British Council. Sorry, very unimpressed.

Hello sab2525,

Thank you for sharing your opinion.  However, I'm afraid you've rather misunderstood the role of the comments sections here on LearnEnglish, and drawn conclusions from false premises. We do not correct the language in any of the comments; if we tried to do so then we would have no time for anything else. Rather, we reply to the questions we are asked and provide as helpful and supportive answers as we are able.

The comment you refer to is an interesting one as it quite nicely demonstrates the importance of exposing users to rich language in a range of contexts rather than following an atomistic approach based on prescriptive rules, and how that kind of exposure can help a learner to express himself or herself effectively in spite of gaps in grammatical knowledge (of which 'wanna' is hardly the most egregious). However, this comment area is a space to support language learners rather than to discuss teaching methodology, so we'll have to go ahead and draw this particular discussion to a close. Thanks for your interesting contribution and good luck with your studies.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

A couple of questions:
1. Can you give me a definition of a clause, and a phrase? You only give examples
2. Why "2 or more clauses" to make a sentence? Isn't one enough.
For example: "An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000"
Is that not a complete sentence?
Thanks

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