The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

I'm satisfied
Thank you sir.

Hello John8888,

No. The first sentence describes a desire for something which you do not have at the moment. The second describes an opportunity in the past which was not taken.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sir/madam
I saw a sentence in a English story book. it is given below into the brackets.
(wrote a note. 'This can help you,' I penned, 'if you will let it.'' )

is it grammatically correct?
Could you please explain to me that can we use will and would in the if part of the sentence.

Hello John8888,

Yes, it is correct because 'will' can be used to indicate willingness – see the dictionary for more on this. Our will or would page might also help. 

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

Thank you so much sir

Hello there,

'I want something to remind me of my trip to London.' Please explain me could we use this sentence in this way also?

'I want something to remind my trip to London'

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

I'm afraid that would not be correct. 'Remind' requires the construction 'remind SB of STH'. You could use the verb 'remember':

I want something to help me remember my trip to London.

I want something to remember my trip to London by.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello there,

I have seen the British council team explained about causative sentence in a previous comment in this page.

Could you explain how this sentence is related to causative. "William brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a........"

'had just had it...' This is the part I am confused. The structure is 'have something done'. So it means it should come in this way: 'had it valued by a.......'

For an example: 'They had their car repaired' structure is 'have something done'

Please explain this one for me.

Thank you.

Hello naaka,

The structure is 'have sth done' as you say, but the first 'have' can be in different forms. We can say, for example:

...will have it done

...would have it done

...has had it done

and, if we have a past perfect form,

...had (just) had it done

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hi , could u please correct these following sentences ?
For instance
, if one the society students after getting graduation can work on doctors
post and can serve the society for social welfare by providing free campus
to its family and relatives.

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