Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Can you help me with another one, please?
He is proud of his literary achievements.
--> He prides...
Thank you for your help.

Hi Jessie,

We're happy to help users when they're stuck, but we don't want to do your homework – we are teachers, too, and your homework is for you to learn from. But I'll give you a hint: look up the word 'pride' in a good dictionary and look for the entry where it is a verb – you can know it's a verb here because it ends in 's', i.e. 'he prides'. I've checked in our dictionary, and it's not there, but it is in the Oxford Dictionary.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, I am Constant, the Constant Gardener. Does anyone knows where I can find the commands, such as the imperatives and others?

Hello Constant,

Rob explains imperatives in the Oxford Scene 1 - Language Focus video. It's really quite simple: just use the base form of the verb, i.e. the infinitive without 'to'. That is the imperative form.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi teacher
I wonder for the grammar . I want ask some question about the clause . I member when I studied English my teacher tell me ( the clause has two sentences connect to gather with so or when or and or if

please tell me if my grammar is wrong or trouth

Hi rashaa96,

I'm afraid I'm not sure I understand your question fully. A sentence can be made of one or more clauses. If there is more than one clause then they can be joined together in different ways, including with the words you give.

For more information on clause structure look here.

For more information on sentence structure look here.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

May I have the link in which the description of "I've been any 3rd form of verb" is given.
just thanks

Hi,
I wonder if this sentence is grammartically correct "what has contributed to cause the accident was the driver's responsibility." I discovered this while i was doing my test.
Looking forward for your respond.

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