The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Firstly,Sir,I would like to know if we can use when with while in this sentence

Hello,

''When I stole his wallet, he started not trusting me anymore, so since then he has not liked me''

''When I stole his wallet, he started not trusting me anymore, so since then he doesn't me''

Which tense is proper (present simple or perfect)?

Thank you.

Hello JakiGeh,

The first one (present perfect) is the correct one in English because the past action began in the past and is still true in the present. The second one is not correct in any situation in English. This is a difference between English and Spanish.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello. Is it okay not to use "the" when you speak about countries? For example. Asia's population were growing each year?

Hello HB11,

The general rules for using 'the' with names (including the names of countries) are on our definite article page, but actually I'd suggest using 'The population of Asia' here. 'Asia's population' is also correct, though, and 'The Asia's population' would not be for the reasons described on the page I linked to above.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir
I am Ronak Acharya From India. I just want to knw difference between i have been working here since 2012, i have worked here since 2012 , And , i have worked here for 4 year.
And also about it's always raining in London or rains in London usually.?

Hello Ronak,

Welcome! Please see our Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous page for an answer to your first question. As for 'since' and 'for', there's a good explanation on this Voice of America page.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

'When you were 8, you didn't invite me to your birthday party. I would have loved to have come'

Is the object ''to have come'' referring to the time before ''loving''? In my opinion, this sentence's meaning is exactly as this sentence's ''I would have loved to come if you had invited me''. Am I right?

Thank you very much.

Hello JakiGeh,

Yes, you're right -- the two different versions mean the same thing.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there,

'In order that sun would not shine in your face, we have this cover''

Why is the modal verb ''would'' being used in the adverbial clause? Is this correct with this sentence?

Thank you.

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