The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Dear sir, I need a lot of collection of idiom and phrase.i want to know what is the best way to search idiom and phrase in Cambridge dictonary.In dictionary there is no comment section for asking questions.
thank.

Hello ritesh,

You can search the Cambridge Dictionary for phrases and idioms. I know that sometimes you can find them that way, but I expect that it will not always work. I expect that you can find rather a lot of idioms by doing an internet search for 'idioms in English' or something similar.

I have no idea what the offer is in India, but you might also want to look into a class in India.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

Does the present simple refer to the future in the adjectival clause or it have its general meaning? If I want it to refer to the future, can I use future simple there? The only reason I'm asking is because there are time clauses, and it has different meanings then, so I think here it could have the same meaning.

''She will go anywhere that I go''

Thanks in advance

Hello JamlMakav,

'Go' here can refer to the future (a particular place) or it can be a general reference describing what you know about the behaviour of the lady.

It is possible to use 'will go' but this changes the meaning. If you say 'will go' then the meaning is something like 'am willing to go' or 'agree to go'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Hello,

'This is how you remind me of what I really am'

Is the pronoun 'what' suitable after of? Shouldn't it be whom?

Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

Both 'who' and 'what' are possible here. We would not use 'whom' as the object of the preposition is not the pronoun byt the whole clause, and 'who' is the subject within the clause.

'Who' would refer to the identity of the person and 'what' would generally refer to something more general such as the type of person they are: loyal, moral etc.

In many contexts they are interchangeable but I think 'what' is more commonly used.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello there,

Please find my query below, which is related to the word 'cross.'
Let's suppose there is a sign board on my left and I am crossing it, while I am in a car. But I want to write something like: " The board crossed me slowly. "
I want to use in this way only. Is this correct grammar wise? If not, can you please correct it.

Hello skywalker,

The grammar is correct but the sentence is very odd, because we don't normally use 'cross' with inanimate objects (such as a sign) as the subject. It sounds as if the board is moving on its own and crossed on top of you.

I can't think of a way you could use those words to express what I think you mean, but you could use 'pass by' to say something like 'The signs passed by slowly'.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you, Kirk, for your response.
I understand that it sounds as if the board is moving, so will it make more sense if I add "in my mind" there. That is, " In my mind, the board crossed me slowly. " Would you use it?

Also, for the sentence you suggested, is it perfectly right to say - " I noticed the board passing by slowly. " I think this one is grammatically correct, can you tell me if I'm right.

Thank you.

Hello skywalker,

To be honest, I wouldn't use 'the board crossed me' in any way. I think people would understand it, but I expect most people would find it as strange as I do.

As for the other sentence, yes, there's no problem in adding 'I noticed' to the beginning. It adds a bit of self-consciousness to the narration, which may be just what you want to communicate.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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