The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello KhansaaKhan,

The present continuous is explained on our present continuous page. Without knowing the context, I could be wrong, but it appears to me that this sentence is describing ongoing negotiations.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sir please tell me which sentence is correct.

Techniques help you learn.
Techniques help you to learn.

Hello Rind.aziz,

Most verbs are followed by a specific verb form, but 'help' can be followed by either the bare infinitive ('learn') or the to + infinitive ('to learn'). There is no difference in meaning. By the way, you can often find this kind of information in the example sentences in the dictionary.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi sir,
i am confused about the following sentence:
"the country is one step closer to achieving a truly historic landmark."
why not "to achieve" has used ?
If "to" is preposition here and requires a noun or noun phrase, then please tell me :Is there any rule which helps in indentifying prepositional ‘to’? If there is no such rule then can we collect a list of such confusing prepositional 'to' if they are not many in number.

Hello KHANSAAKHAN,

'To' here is indeed a preposition and so is here followed by a gerund. I'm afraid there is no rule for identifying this; you simply need to remember that certain phrases collocate with certain forms (e.g. 'be close to' is followed by a gerund/noun).

 


Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir,
I would like to ask the two following questions:
1- what is the grammatic forms construction that this sentence is contained
"The first thing I want to do is get things tidied up"
2- In the same above sentence, Why the verd to be (is) is there? Because I've knew that verb to be (is) don't with the present tense (get)?

I am looking forward to your kind reply
and thanks for the efforts

Bashar

Hello Bashar,

This is an example of a cleft sentence - specifically, a wh-cleft sentence.

It is a way of emphasising certain information in the sentence and it is quite correct. You can find more information on this here.

 


Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Is this sentence correct? Does this relate to any of the topics mentioned.
"Buddy, if you came to my wedding, I would be very happy!"

Hello EagerLearner,

Yes, that sentence is correct. It uses an if-clause, and you can learn more about the structure of this sentence on this page.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Where to use comma? I am in habit of using that on and the off what to do in order to overlook this "over-generalization"?

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