Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello waqar_ahmad,

Please try answering these yourself, and then we or other users can point out where you've made mistakes. Please note that we don't do people's homework!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Teachers.
Could you help me?
I'm interested in the following context.
The given line graph represents an overwiev with regard to gender participation in sports centre. The analysis includes ( a ) thirty years duration ( from 1980 to 2010 )
Have I used the article correct?
I particularly interested in the word 'duration' in this context.
Thank you beforehand.

Best wishes.

Hello Kamran Ibragimov,

The sentence needs a few alterations:

The given line graph provides an overview of gender participation in sports centres (or 'the sports centre' if it is one particular sports centre). The analysis covers a period of thirty years (from 1980 to 2010).

This would be the most natural way to phrase it. You could also say 'a thirty-year period'.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Mr. Peter
Thank you for your response.
So,Can I use the second one in formal writing, such as IELTS?
Could you also explain me punctuation?
Their car was bigger and therefore more comfortable.
and
It is clear Luccy is unhappy.Therefore, it comes as no surprise she has decided to resign.

As I understood if after 'therefore' is an adjective, noun or gerund (no verb) coma is not necessary. However, the following sentence break my conjectures.
We therefore recommend the abolition of the rule.

Please help me to figure out the way to use punctuation correctly.

Thank you beforehand.
Best wishes.

Hello Kamran,

Yes, you could use the second one in a formal context, though I, like Peter, would probably use a different word than 'desideratum', which is so rarely used it sounds strange in most contexts.

I'm not familiar with the rule that you mention about 'therefore'. Traditionally, adverbials at the beginning of a sentence (such as 'traditionally' at the beginning of this sentence, but also 'therefore' and 'however') are followed by a comma, but more and more often this custom is not followed.

You might want to look up 'therefore' in a concordancer so that you can see how it has been used in lots of different sentences - this should give you a sense for what punctuation is used with it.

Good luck!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sirs.
Could you check please these sentences.
The given histogram indicates information with regard to modes of conveyances. ( 'with regard to' is that correct?)
and
A third of those who took part in the survey claimed that personal vehicles were a desideratum for work. ( 'a desideratum for' is that correct?) (Formal writing).
Thank you beforehand.
Best wishes

Hello Kamran Ibragimov,

Both sentences are correct, though the style of the second one is very formal - desideratum is a quite uncommon word. In the first sentence 'indicates' might be better replaced with 'provides', I would say.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello kirk,
Concerning Musty's question you mean we can not use the word "ago"specifically with the present perfect. But in the following sentences "last Tuesday" or "1965" refer to a time in the past that is finished .
We have taught at this school since 1965.
They have been at the hotel since last Tuesday.Therefore can we say "I have not heard from him since last 2 weeks."?
Thank you,

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