Clause, phrase and sentence

 

The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

'love to hate'-is this a phrase verb, verbal phrase or perhaps a prepositional phrase??
Thanks for your support

Hello teresaolamide,

'Love to hate' is a verb phrase.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
"Is it open Sunday?"
is it the above one correct or wrong? Open is verb. But why didn't use do for make question?

tharindu

Hello Tharindu lakshan,

'Open' can be both a verb and an adjective.  Thus we can say both 'open the door' and 'an open door'.  Your question here can be rephrased as 'Is it open on Sunday?'

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi friends,
I want to know what are the difference yet and still. And also how do i use it??

Tharindu

Hi Tharindu lakshan,

You can find explanations, examples and an exercise to practise these words, plus 'already' on this page.

I hope that helps you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Learn Term,

Please highlight the point "William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and [[had just had]] it valued by a London dealer at £180,000. Can you please explain how it is narrated: had just had.

Kind Regards,

Hi krehman,

had just had is the verb have in the past perfect (had had) used as a causative with the adverb just (meaning something like "a moment before") and the past participle valued.

This causative structure, have + object + past participle, is used to refer to something that we ask another person to do for us. For example, if my car was dirty and I took it to a somewhere to be washed, I can say "I had (have) my car (object) washed (past participle)".

In your sentence, had had is the verb have, it is the object, and valued is the past participle. In this context, it means that Brown took the violin to be valued not long before that time.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Sirs.
I heard about one structure-these being, for instance:The graph provide with information in 3 countries,these being the USA, Canada and Poland.
Is it right?

Best wishes.

Hello Kamran Ibragimov,

Yes, that's a perfectly fine sentence.  The phrase 'these being' (or 'those being') is an alternative to 'which are' in this context.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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