The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hello chathuri1982,

We have a page explaining this very point, with numerous examples. You can find it here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I am confused in using the word "would" . For example, sometimes it is used in past tense like:
When I was young I would go to the school.
It's also used for requests:
Would you get me a cup of tea, please?
Would you come here, please?
can I know where and why we should use the word "Would"?

hello ca.kulwinder, is would not a command?

Thanks a lot, Mr. Peter.

hi
what is the meaning of past here?
a girl push past him and spilled his coffee on him

Hello chris,

Please check the dictionary for this and your other similar queries. If you have already checked, please explain to us more specifically what you don't understand, i.e. tell us which entries didn't make sense to you. We're happy to help, but we do ask that users check the dictionary and explain their queries a bit more.

Thanks.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
sir there is a sentence:
"i am looking forward to receiving an application form."
plz tell me why not "to receive" is used here.

Hello Khansaakhan,

'to' is a preposition here, and verbs that follow prepositions go in the -ing form – that's why this sentence is written the way it is.

As you can see the word 'to' can be a bit tricky, because sometimes it is part of an infinitive (e.g. 'I want to drink some tea') and sometimes a preposition (e.g. 'I look forward to drinking some tea'). There is no easy way to know which form it is – it is something you have to learn. Therefore I'd suggest you make a list of phrases in which 'to' is a preposition, as you now have the first item on that list: 'looking forward to doing something'. Another one is 'to be/get used to doing something'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello.please explain me whether this sentence is true?
In the1800s industrial expansion was greatest in the north،as was the development of the railroad systems.
If this is true please tell me the role of "as"here.
with best regards

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