interrogative determiners: which and what

 

We use "which" as a determiner to ask a question about a specific group of people or things:

Which restaurant did you go to?
Which countries in South America have you visited?

When we are asking a general question we use "what" as a determiner:

What films do you like?
What university did you go to?

Comments

What about if i live in England and what will the question if somebody wants to know my city. Will the question be: what city or which city? Thanks in advance

Hello Bassnanga,

That really depends on how the person asking the questions perceives the situation. If you've just talked about different cities, for example, 'which' (as the explanation above indicates) would be used since the topic of cities has already been mentioned. If, on the other hand, the topic of where you live hasn't been mentioned, 'what' would be used.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi i have a question that we can have full file as grammar to print it and use it when we haven't PC . if is possible how and where can i have it . thanks for your attention

Hello abbas,

I'm afraid that our Grammar Reference is not available in a printable format, but if you have a smartphone or tablet, there are several free apps designed for improving your grammar knowledge. For example, there's our LearnEnglish Grammar app - but be sure to look on our Apps page for a complete listing. 

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, i can read & understand meaning of a particular sentence, but i can't write the same sentence individually. what i do make a sentence correct ?

Hello K Balamurugan,

I'm afraid I'm not sure I understand what you mean. Perhaps it would help for you to break the sentences into meaningful chunks - this could help you understand how the pieces fit together.

For example, the sentence 'We have taken 70 wickets in seven matches and bowled out the opposition every time, so we know what we need to do. We are ready for anything we get' (from the BBC) can be broken into parts in different ways, but here's one: 'We have taken' (subject and verb), '70 wickets' (object of verb), 'in seven matches' (time expression), 'and bowled out the opposition' (second verb and object), 'every time' (time expression), 'so' (connecting conjunction), 'we know' (subject and verb), 'what we need to do' (relative pronoun + subject and verb + infinitive). 

I hope this gives you some ideas.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi mesuuakan,

We are often asked how a person can improve speaking, but it's hard to give specific advice without knowing how they speak at the moment. However, there are some general suggestions that I can make which will help you to improve over time. The most important thing you can do is to speak English as often as possible. To do this a partner is very helpful, so think about the people you know and consider if any of them could be a practice partner for you. It may be that you know someone else who is also learning English and who would like to practise with you, or perhaps you know some people who do not speak your language but do speak English. However, if you do not have a practice partner it does not mean that you cannot practise because it is possible to practise alone. Just speaking English to yourself while you are at home, going about your normal daily activities, can help a great deal with your fluency and can help you to feel more confident, which will help you to cut down your hesitating.

You can also use the audio and video materials here on LearnEnglish to improve your fluency. After doing the exercises, try listening with the transcript (listening and reading). Then try saying the text yourself, and finally try saying it with (and at the same speed as) the recording. This will help you to develop speed in your speech, which is a key component of fluency. You'll also pick up a lot of language as chunks - words which are often used together in set phrases - which you can use to communicate with less hesitation.

I hope those suggestions are helpful.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

can you say 'which university did you go to ?' just like ' which restaurant did you go to ?'

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