Can you match these possessive pronouns to the right personal pronouns and possessive adjectives?
 

yours, mine, theirs, ours, hers, his, its

 

Subject Object Possessive adjectives

Possessive pronouns

I me  my  
You you  your  
He him  his  
She her  her  
It it  its  
We us  our  
They them  their  

 

We can use a possessive pronoun instead of a noun phrase:

 

Is that John’s car?   No, it’s [my car] > No, it’s mine.
Whose coat is this?   Is it [your coat]? > Is it yours?
Her coat is grey, [my coat]is brown   Her coat is grey,   mine is brown.

 

 

We can use possessive pronouns after of.

We can say:

Susan is one of my friends.
or
Susan is a friend of mine.
but not 
Susan is a friend of me

or

I am one of Susan's friends.
or
I am a friend of Susan's.
but not 
I am a friend of Susan

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

hello learnenglish.britishcouncil.org staff,
Thank you for your pretty and useful job that you are doing here

We can say:
Susan is one of my friends.
or
Susan is a friend of mine.
but not
Susan is a friend of me. neither I am a friend of Susan.
Why not the last sentence?

Hello Ayman,

Although people would certainly understand you if you said 'I am a friend of Susan', that's not the way people speak; they say 'I am a friend of Susan's.' You could think of this as a shortened form of 'I am a friend of Susan's many friends', but I'd recommend just accepting that this is considered correct, even if it doesn't make complete sense.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Mr. Kirk
I do not understand why there are two opinions about possessive pronouns. You say that standard English and native speakers do not say, ' He is a friend of Peter' but 'He is a friend of Peter's'. Well, there is another who says that the former could also be correct. So, which is the correct answer as both of you are native speakers? Would appreciate if you could clarify this matter.

Hello Bonaventure,

I'm afraid we don't comment on other websites or opinions. You'll have to make up your own mind on this one, though I'd encourage you to carefully check how these words are used in example sentences in dictionaries.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Teachers
I wanna ask a question Please
Which is correct ?
my wife prepared a cup of tea for ( me or mine )

Hello MoHa-Mo,

After prepositions (such as 'for'), the object form of pronouns is used. So, in this case, 'me' is the form to use. See the Object pronouns section on our personal pronouns page for more on this.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

But in the above example
Susan is a friend of mine.
but not
Susan is a friend of me??

Hello MoHa-Mo,

Yes, you're right – sorry for the confusion. The example of 'a friend of mine' is an exception to the rule, i.e. in almost all other cases, after the object form of a pronoun is used after a preposition, e.g. 'They talked about him', 'We've not heard anything from her', 'You're looking at me?', etc.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello! Could you tell me what is difference between two questions: 1) Is this coat yours? 2) Is Diana a friend of yours? Why in first question is only coat yours (without of) and in the second is a friend of mine.
Tnank you in advance

Hello kea75,

In 1), 'this coat' and 'yours' are different parts of the sentence structure. 'this coat' is the subject noun phrase and 'yours' is the predicate. In 2), on the other hand, 'a friend of yours' all goes together as one predicate noun phrase. 

When we want to use a possessive adjective with a noun, there can't be a determiner in front of it – for example, we can say 'my coat' but not *'a my coat'. For this reason, the possessive structure 'of + possessive' is used: 'a coat of mine'.

I hope that clarifies it a bit for you.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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