one and ones

 

We use one (singular) and ones (plural) to avoid unnecessary repetition.

See those two girls? Helen is the tall one and Jane is the short one.
Which is your car, the red one or the blue one?
My trousers are torn. I need some new ones.
See those two girls. Helen is the one on the left.
Let’s look at the photographs. The ones you took in Paris.

We often use them after Which ... in questions:

You can borrow a book. Which one do you want?
There are lots of books here. Which ones are yours?

Exercise

Comments

Hello Sir,
I have a question regarding comparatives actually, that are mentioned here.

In one sentence above, it is written:
Helen is the TALL one and Jane is the SHORT one (instead of taller and shorter)

and in a sentence in the exercise on this page, it is written:
The YOUNGER one is old and the OLDER one is seven (instead of young and old)

Please tell me why there is such discrepancy in these sentences.

Thank you

Hello adtyagrwl3,

In the first example both 'tall' and 'taller' are possible, and 'short' and 'shorter'. If we say 'tall' then we are simply describing a characteristic of Helen; if we say 'taller' then we are comparing her to someone else.

In the second example there is a similar choice. We can describe a general characteristic ('young') or compare the person with someone else ('younger').

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
Should the sentence ‘I hope this holiday will be one to remember.’ be 'I hope this holiday will be one to be remembered.’? If both of them are right, could you please tell me the difference? Thank you very much indeed.

Best,
Echo

Hi Echo,

Grammatically, one is active and one is passive, but there is no difference in meaning or use.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
I need to know which is the correct choice;.
Which socks do you wear? The black ( one / ones ) .

Thank u

Hello Kaz,

'sock' is the singular form and 'socks' is a plural form. Likewise, 'one' is a singular form and 'ones' is plural. The two should match.

I hope this helps you find the correct answer.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Please help me with this question. I have 2 sentences:
1/ Who goes to school with you?
2/ Who go to school with you?
I was told that I must always use singular verb in "who" and "what" questions. Anyway, is the second sentence always incorrect?

Hello hungduc,

It is not incorrect to use a plural verb with 'who'. However, if we do not know that the answer is going to be plural then we generally use a singular verb. For example:

'Who goes to school with you?' - a general question

'Who go to school with you?' - a question I might ask when looking at a group of people and asking which of them go to school with you

I hope that helps to clarify it for you.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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