Topic
Pronouns - personal pronouns (I, me, you etc)

Pronouns are words we use in the place of a full noun.

We have both subject and object pronouns:

 

Subject Object
I me
you you
he him
she her
it it
we us
you you
they them

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

This is Jack. He’s my brother. I don’t think you have met him.
This is Angela. She’s my sister. Have you met her before?
Talk to a friend. Ask them to help you.
You could go to a doctor. They might help you.

Subject pronouns

We use subject pronouns as subject of the verb:

I like your dress.
You are late.
He is my friend
It is raining
She is on holiday
We live in England.
They come from London.

 

Warning

Remember: English clauses always have a subject:

His father has just retired. Was a teacher. > He was a teacher.
I’m waiting for my wife. Is late.  > She is late.

If there is no other subject we use it or there. We call this a dummy subject.

 

 Object pronouns

 We use object pronouns:

• as the object of the verb:

Can you help me please?
I can see you.
She doesn’t like him.
I saw her in town today.
We saw them in town yesterday, but they didn’t see us.

• after prepositions:

She is waiting for me.
I’ll get it for you.
Give it to him.
Why are you looking at her?
Don’t take it from us.
I’ll speak to them

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hi Sir,

SBI is one of those banks that gives loans easily

Is it a correct sentence. I know 'one of +plural noun+singular verb' but when the sentence is in simple present singular subject takes 's form' I am confused?

Hello abymonly,

In the present simple tense, the -s that is added to the end of singular third-person verbs doesn't indicate plurality – it's just a verb ending.

You're right that 'one of' + plural noun takes a singular verb. Your sentence has the relative pronoun 'that' in it, which makes it a bit different because the subject of the verb is not 'one' but rather 'those banks'. So properly speaking, the verb should be the plural verb 'give' in your sentence, but actually I'd recommend you use the singular verb! I know this may sound strange, but most people would say 'gives', even though strictly speaking it's not logical here.

So your sentence is correct – good work!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
In the following sentence 'however' refers to process or the listener -
The true appreciation of music is an arcane process closed to the uninitiated listener, however enthusiastic.
Sir how do we get to know to whom the sentence after comma is referring to.

Hello neh7272,

'however enthusiastic' refers to the listener – here the full ending of the sentence is something like 'however enthusiastic they may be'. According to this statement, no matter how enthusiastic a listener may be, they cannot truly appreciate music without having been initiated.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

which is correct? I am confused with whom and who

1)Justice Markandey Katju, Chairman of the Press Council of India (PCI), has spoken of minimum qualifications for journalists whom he thinks don't understand much of what they write about.
2)Justice Markandey Katju, Chairman of the Press Council of India (PCI), has spoken of minimum qualifications for journalists who he thinks don't understand much of what they write about.

Hello abymonly,

The second sentence is the correct way to express this. 'Who' is the subject of the second clause and he phrase 'he thinks' does not affect this. If we take this out of the context of a relative clause then it becomes clearer:

He, I think, does not understand much of what he writes about.

Him, I think, does not understand much of what he writes about.

Looked at like this, it is clear that a subject pronoun is needed and so 'who' is correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks,nice tutorial

Thanks a lot! I've got very useful information!

Thank you ,,,,,,,,,,

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