Most verbs have past tense and past participle in –ed ( worked, played, listened). But many of the most frequent verbs are irregular:

Base form Past tense Past participle

be
begin
break
bring
buy
build
choose
come
cost
cut
do
draw
drive
eat
feel
find
get
give
go
have
hear
hold
keep
know
leave
lead
let
lie
lose
make
mean
meet
pay
put
run
say
see
sell
send
set
sit
speak
spend
stand
take
teach
tell
think
understand
wear
win
write

was/were
began
broke
brought
bought
built
chose
came
cost
cut
did
drew
drove
ate
felt
found
got
gave
went
had
heard
held
kept
knew
left
led
let
lay
lost
made
meant
met
paid
put
ran
said
saw
sold
sent
set
sat
spoke
spent
stood
took
taught
told
thought
understood
wore
won
wrote
been
begun
broken
brought
bought
built
chosen
come
cost
cut
done
drawn
driven
eaten
felt
found
got
given
gone
had
heard
held
kept
known
left
led
let
lain
lost
made
meant
met
paid
put
run
said
seen
sold
sent
set
sat
spoken
spent
stood
taken
taught
told
thought
understood
worn
won
written

 

 

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hello!
I just want to ask about the difference between past and pass? The words are quite confusing. Help me please. Thank you very much

Hello RTris,

You can use the dictionary on the right ('Cambridge Dictionaries Online') to look up each word and see all of the definitions each has.

Both words can refer to movement, and I think it is this use which can be confusing.

'Past' is a preposition, while 'pass' is a verb. For example:

I walked past the shop. ['walked' is the verb; 'past' is an adjective]

I passed the shop. ['passed' is the verb]

I hope that clarifies it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, I have doubts ,,, 1.can we use prepostitions at the end of sentences, for example, Such an accident has never been heard of(Here I am confused why we have used OF after heard)..
2. Can we use past tense in one clause and present tense in 2nd clause?
Eg. I remember the year when she was married.
(Or we have to use the same tense in both clauses )
I remembered the year when she was married.

Hello Sonam,

1. Yes, prepositions that go with a verb are often used at the end of a sentence. In the sentence you ask about, 'of' is indeed used with 'hear'. This is very common, especially in the present perfect – see the dictionary entry on this.

2. Yes, you can use different tenses in different clauses. In general, the tense you use should be appropriate for the time you're speaking about. The first version you mention (with present and past) is correct.

I hope that clarifies things for you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
what is past participle ?

Hello neh7272,

The past participle is also known as the 'third form'. For example, in the sentence 'I have seen the Lotus Temple', the verb is 'have seen' (present perfect); the past participle is 'seen'. Past participles can also be used in other ways.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir,
I am looking of uses of Moreover, Furthermore and In addition . I have searched on this wesite with the help of the search button but didn't get the appropriate result.

Hello sanjay.singh,

As far as I know, we don't have a page that specifically addresses this topic. In any case, I'd suggest looking them up in the Cambridge Dictionary, where you can find not only definitions, but example sentences. And if you're interested in improving your academic writing, I'd suggest taking a look at our Writing for a Purpose section.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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