irregular verbs

 

 

Most verbs have past tense and past participle in –ed ( worked, played, listened). But many of the most frequent verbs are irregular:

Base form Past tense Past participle

be
begin
break
bring
buy
build
choose
come
cost
cut
do
draw
drive
eat
feel
find
get
give
go
have
hear
hold
keep
know
leave
lead
let
lie
lose
make
mean
meet
pay
put
run
say
see
sell
send
set
sit
speak
spend
stand
take
teach
tell
think
understand
wear
win
write

was/were
began
broke
brought
bought
built
chose
came
cost
cut
did
drew
drove
ate
felt
found
got
gave
went
had
heard
held
kept
knew
left
led
let
lay
lost
made
meant
met
paid
put
ran
said
saw
sold
sent
set
sat
spoke
spent
stood
took
taught
told
thought
understood
wore
won
wrote
been
begun
broken
brought
bought
built
chosen
come
cost
cut
done
drawn
driven
eaten
felt
found
got
given
gone
had
heard
held
kept
known
left
led
let
lain
lost
made
meant
met
paid
put
run
said
seen
sold
sent
set
sat
spoken
spent
stood
taken
taught
told
thought
understood
worn
won
written

 

 

 

Exercise

Comments

Hello Haytham Hawamdeh,

We do not comment on what information other sites may provide. I can make two points, however.

First, 'lying' is not a past participle of any verb. It is a present participle or an -ing form.

Second, there are two verbs with the base form (infinitive) 'lie', only one of which is irregular:

1. lie as in deliberately say something untrue. The forms for this are lie - lied - lied, so it is a regular and not irregular verb, using ';-ed' (in this case '-d' as the base form already ends in an 'e') to form the past and past participle forms.

2. lie as in lie down on a bedThe forms for this verb are lie - lay - lain, as in the explanation above. This is an irregular verb

Both verbs are intransitive, meaning they have no object.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

what difference between "I WAS GOING" and 'I HAD BEEN GONE'

hi xoxopooja i am a little bit out of practice but i think that i coud perhaps help u a little bit with your dout. you have to look for the concept of each tense, i mean, the secuence of time they are refering to. i don't know in this site because i am new here, but there are graphics that ilustrate the begining and end of the action for each verb tense taking as reference the person who is speaking or stating the phrase

Hello xoxopooja,

'I was going' is an example of a past continuous form whereas 'I had been gone' is an example of a past perfect form (although it looks like a passive form, 'go' is an intransitive verb and has no passive forms; therefore here, 'gone' is functioning as an adjective). You can find more information on each of these forms by clicking the links above.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Rahul,

The meaning is very close, but I'd say that someone might add the 'up' for emphasis or clarity. It's possible, for example, to climb down a cliff. It can also simply be a stylistic choice.

Best wishes,

Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

Your comment has been queued for review by site administrators and will be published after approval.

can i also write it as
your comment is queued for review by site administrators and will be published after approval.
plz explain

he is dead..

he has died..

both are used alternatively..what's the difference.. em confused in them.
sir sometimes i get confused whether i should go with is/are or has/have +3rd form.
plz clear my doubt.

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