The modal verbs are:

can could
may might
shall should
will would

We use modal verbs to show if we believe something is certain, probable or possible (or not). We also use modals to do things like talking about ability, asking permission making requests and offers, and so on.
 

Section: 

Comments

hi teachers, i have a question for you! i noticed this expression lately:overhead locker space is limited on busy flights your cabin bag may have to go on hands. i was wondering which of this sentence is right 1)the weather is going be bad next week the race may have to bring forward to this one or in this another way ..2)the weather is going be bad next week the race may have to be brought forward to this one.

thank you early.

Hello rosario,

Did you have a question regarding the first sentence? That is a standard phrase in air travel, though I've usually heard it end a bit differently, e.g. '... your cabin bag may have to go under the seat in front of you'. Regarding the other two sentences, only 2 is correct – the past participle 'brought' is needed to form the passive infinitive 'to be brought forward'.

By the way, people usually say 'Thank you in advance' instead of 'thank you early'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, I was wondering about the complete list of modal words. It appears as this isn't complete. ------ suggests that the modal verbs are "can, could, may, might, must, ought to, shall, should, will, would". Is that correct and is that the complete list?

Hello Bighug,

'ought to' is generally considered a semi-modal verb and that's why it's not in the list on our page. English teachers often present 'ought to' with modal verbs, however, because it's very similar. In the end, whether it is a modal verb or not isn't important for most purposes, but if you're interested in the topic I'd suggest you consult the wikipedia entry on English modal verbs.

By the way, the link you wrote was deleted because we don't generally publish links to other sites. This is simply because we don't have the time to investigate what people link to; you don't need to worry, I just wanted to explain why the link was missing.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir,for requests which modal verb is used for more politeness -will or would or could?

Hello surendra kumar,

In general, 'would' and 'could' are more polite than 'will', but please read our pages on these modal verbs for more information.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks Sir and Merry Christmas!

If we are to fill in the blank correct modal verb for asking permission and we are not sure about the situation being formal or informal,which one is better to be used-can or may? Please explain,Sir.

Hello surendra kumar,

'can' is appropriate in a wider variety of contexts, so I'd recommend using 'can' over 'may', but that really depends on who's correcting the gaps. In many social situations (i.e. outside of class), though, sometimes it's better to be too formal than it is to be too informal, so 'may' might be more appropriate then. It really depends on the context and the on the relationship between the speakers.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks Sir!

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