Questions and negatives:

We make questions by putting the subject after may/might:
May I …? Could I … Might I …? Etc.

The negative forms are may not and might not..

We use may:

  • when we are not sure about something:

Jack may be coming to see us tomorrow.
Oh dear! It’s half past ten. We may be late for the meeting.
There may not be very many people there.

  • to make polite requests:

May I borrow the car tomorrow?
May we come a bit later?

When we use may not for a refusal it is emphatic:

You may not!
You may not borrow the car until you can be more careful with it.

We use might:

• when we are not sure about something:

I might see you tomorrow.
It looks nice, but it might be very expensive.
It’s quite bright. It might not rain today.

• As the past tense of may for requests:

He asked if he might borrow the car.
They wanted to know if they might come later.

• For very polite requests:

Might I ask you a question?
Might we just interrupt for a moment?

We use may have and might have to show that something has possibly happened now or happened at some time in the past:

It’s ten o’clock. They might have arrived now.[= Perhaps they have arrived]
They may have arrived hours ago. [= Perhaps they arrived hours ago.]

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

hello !
is the below sentence correct ?
have come to Mumbai to pick her for Delhi for 4 days.
'to' and 'for' have been used twice consecutively.

The sentence means :-
The person has gone to other city to pick his Mom and they are together going to their home town and would drop her back in 4 days.
Please suggest a correction.

Hello bunts,

I'm afraid we don't provide this kind of service, as our main purpose is to help people use our site. Questions about content on our site are welcome, but we just have too much other work to be able to provide the free service of helping users with sentences they find or have created. Nonetheless, I will help you with this one, but please don't make it a habit, as we won't be able to respond to future enquiries like this one.

As it stands, your sentence is unclear. First of all, there is no subject, and if the subject is one person, the verb is incorrect -- it should be 'has come'. The verb 'pick' is not correct -- instead I think you mean 'pick up'. Then what 'for' in 'for Delhi' means isn't clear -- based on your explanation I'd say something like 'to take her to Delhi' instead. The idea of returning her to Mumbai isn't completely clear, but can be assumed.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello !
is the below sentence correct ?
have come to Mumbai to pick her for Delhi for 4 days.

to and for have been used twice consecutively.

Hello bunts,

The use of 'for' here is fine: the first describes the purpose of or reason for the action and the second describes a duration. However, the rest of the sentence does not seem likely to be correct. I'm not sure what you are trying to say and so I can't suggest a correction.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

The sentence means :-

The person has gone to other city to pick his Mom and they are together going to their home town and would drop her back in 4 days.

Please suggest a correction.

It is better to "love and lose" than not to have loved at all.
a)Be loved and lost
b)Have loved and lost
c)Have been loved and lost
Please explain the answer

Hello ajithpd41,

I'm afraid we don't provide answers to tasks from elsewhere. It's not our role to help with homework or tests and in any case with so many thousands of users on the site it simply would not be possible for us to do so in any case.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, 'Might have been' Comes under which tense?
Please help me to get correct usage of ' Might have been'

Hello ajithpd41,

'Might have been' is not a tense at all. It is a modal verb ('might') with perfective aspect ('might have') followed by a past participle ('been').

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

i have to have dinner. sir is it correct sentence

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