will have or would have

 

We use the perfective will have when we are looking back from a point in time when something will have happened.

By the end of the decade scientists will have discovered a cure for influenza.
I will phone at six o’clock. He will have got home by then.

or looking "back" from the present:

Look at the time. The match will have started.
It’s half past five. Dad will have finished work.

We use would have as the past tense form of will have:

I phoned at six o’clock. I knew he would have got home by then.
It was half past five. Dad would have finished work.

We use would have in past conditionals to talk about something that did not happen:

If it had been a little warmer we would have gone for a swim.
He would have been very angry if he had seen you.
 

Exercise

Comments

Hello....I'm little confuse about
If it had been a little warmer we would have gone for a swim.
In this sentence can we use "was" instead of "had been"
He would have been very angry if he had seen you.
In this can we use Become
And another one is some authors use this I.e would have in the sense of future time then how is it possible like
You are gaining access to information you would have missed had you been engaged in the usual monologue
Plz give your opinion

Hello akshaya10,

In your first sentence we cannot use 'was' instead of 'had been'. The sentence is about a hypothetical situation in the past, and 'was' could only be used in this context for a hypothetical situation in the present:

If it was a little warmer we would go for a swim.

This is because we move the verb form into the past to show an unreal or hypothetical situation.

We could use 'If it had become warmer...' instead of 'have been' - the verb form is the same here; only the vocabulary is different.

Your sentence 'You are gaining access to information you would have missed had you been engaged in the usual monologue' does not refer to future time but to past time - the monologue and the 'missing' are both in the past here.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Hi,

Which is the right expression and why? Am I right to say that "every", combined with "when", makes the sentence declarative? And hence 2 is correct? Thanks in advance :)

1) "When you reach home every night, you'd have worked for a day."

2) "When you reach home every night, you'll have worked for a day."

Hi iamalearner,

It is possible to combine 'when' and 'every', but it does not make sense in your context. The relationship between the clauses here is similar to that in a conditional sentence with 'if', so the 'when' clause must provide a reason or evidence for the result clause; your sentence does not do this, as reaching home every night does not provide evidence of the conclusion. The problem is not one of grammar but one of sense. To make the sentence work, the relationship must be clearer:

When you reach home without any problems every night, you'll have learned the route.

When your cakes turn out perfect every time, you'll be a proper baker.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

Can you please tell me the difference between these sentences and tell me which is right

1. The chemistry values have populated.

2. The chemistry values have been populated.

Thanks in advance!

Hello Herr_Kiki,

The first sentence has a verb in the present perfect in the active voice, and the second is the same except that it is in the passive voice. I'd say the first is incorrect, but that really depends on what exactly the sentence means, which is unclear to me.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi :) i'm a little confused... please help :)

is this correct: I carefully thought this through and sincerely regret that I would have to pass up the opportunity.

or is this better: I carefully thought this through and sincerely regret that I have to pass up the opportunity.

thanks so much :)

Hi y5y3n,

I'd recommend the second sentence, but with the present perfect instead, though exactly how you should say it really depends on the context:

'I have carefully thought this through and sincerely regret that I have to pass up the opportunity' (I've thought about it and have decided not to accept)

'I carefully thought this through and sincerely regret that I have had to pass up the opportunity'. (I thought about it and have already declined the offer)

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

Why do they use "were" when it is used along with plural? Please explain.

e.g. I would buy that computer if it were cheaper.

In that (above mentioned) example, computer is 'singular' and it should be like "I would buy that computer if it was cheaper.", correct?

Thank you.

Hi PrashantK,

You are correct that normally we use a singular verb after 'it'. However, in condition sentences we can follow 'if' with were, even with a singular noun. That is why we say (as in the song) 'If I were a rich man...' rather than 'If I was...'. In all of these examples 'was' is also correct, but 'were' is more common, I would say.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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