We use will:

  • to talk about the future – to say what we believe will happen
  • to talk about what people want to do or are willing to do
  • to make promises and offers

would is the past tense form of will. Because it is a past tense it is used:

  • to talk about the past.
  • to talk about hypotheses – things that are imagined rather than true.
  • for politeness.

Beliefs

We use will

  • to say what we believe will happen in the future:

We'll be late.
We will have to take the train.

We use would as the past tense of will:

  • to say what we believed would happen:

I thought I would be late …… so I would have to take the train.

Offers and promises

We use I will or We will to make offers and promises:

I’ll give you a lift home after the party.
We will come and see you next week.

Willingness

  • to talk about what people want to do or are willing to do:

We’ll see you tomorrow.
Perhaps dad will lend me the car.

We use would as the past tense of will:

  • to talk about what people wanted to do or were willing to do:

We had a terrible night. The baby wouldn’t go to sleep. He kept waking up and crying.
Dad wouldn’t lend me the car, so we had to take the train.

  • to talk about something that we did often in the past because we wanted to do it:

When they were children they used to spend their holidays at their grandmother’s at the seaside. They would get up early every morning and they’d have a quick breakfast then they would run across the road to the beach.

Conditionals

We use will in conditionals with if and unless to say what we think will happen in the future or present:

I’ll give her a call if I can find her number.
You won’t get in unless you have a ticket.

We use would to talk about hypotheses, about something which is possible but not real:

  • to talk about the result or effect of a possible situation:

It would be very expensive to stay in a hotel.

  • in conditionals with words like if and what if. In these sentences the main verb is usually in the past tense:

I would give her a call if I could find her number.
If I had the money I'd buy a new car.
You would lose weight if you took more exercise.
If he got a new job he would probably make more money.
What if he lost his job. What would happen then?

We use conditionals to give advice:

Dan will help you if you ask him.

Past tenses are more polite:

Dan would help you if you asked him.

Phrases with would:

  • would you…, would you mind (not) -ing, for requests:

Would you carry this for me please?
Would you mind carrying this?
Would you mind not telling him that?

  • would you like ...; would you like to ...,  for offers and invitations:

Would you like to come round tomorrow?
Would you like another drink?

  • I would like …; I’d like … (you)(to) ..., to say what we want or what we want to do:

I’d like that one please.
I’d like to go home now.

  • I’d rather… (I would rather) to say what we prefer:

I’d rather have that one.
I’d rather go home now.

  • I would thinkI would imagine, I'd guess, to give an opinion when we are not sure or when we want to be polite:

It’s very difficult I would imagine.
I would think that’s the right answer.

 

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

What is the meaning of "would be...., would not be..." meaning in the following sentence? other wise what is the meaning of total sentence?

Hello Samuel,

I'm afraid I don't know which sentence you're asking about. Can you please clarify this?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Good day!
I did APTIS trial test and there was one sentence, that really confused me.
" If you take better care of your car, you________ need to go to a mechanic every week."
- hadn't
- wouldn't
- won't

I chose "won't" cause it seemed that the sentence was first conditional (real situation), nevertheless the correct answer was "wouldn't". Could you please explain to me why we should use "wouldn't" in this case and can't use "won't"?

Hello Adi Shakti,

The correct answer to the sentence as you write it is won't and not wouldn't. I can't comment on the test itself as I haven't seen it, obviously, but it is of course possible that there is an error in it. Of course it may also be that you are misremembering the question.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team 

Hello, Peter!
Thank you so much for your reply. The question is correct, I double checked it, so I suppose it's just mistake in the test itself.

What is the difference between :
Only a person who is out of his mind would do such a thing.
And
Only a person who is out of his mind will do such a thing.
Thanks a lot.

Hello HT2001,

That's kind of a difficult question to ask! In general, the first one speaks about something hypothetical whereas the second one could be a prediction. But as you can see above 'will' and 'would' are both used in different ways, and especially without knowing the context, it would take quite a bit of explaining to cover all the possible meanings. 

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

What is the difference between:
If we go to Austria, we will be surrounded by nature.
And
If we went to Austria, we would be surrounded by nature.

I've read this sentence in a history book:
If he would make a victorious peace with the powers he had just crushed, he could determine the outcome of the Spanish war.
What is the function of would in this sentence? Why did we use it? Why didn't we simply use 'if he makes'? Also, why did we use could? why not can?
Thank you so much.

Hello there
Can I say "he would really care for you " instead he cares for you ??

Looking forward to hearing from you shortly

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