We use the present perfect to show that something has continued up to the present

They’ve been married for nearly fifty years.
She has lived in Liverpool all her life.

… or is important in the present:

I’ve lost my keys. I can’t get into the house.
Teresa isn’t at home. I think she has gone shopping.

We use the present perfect continuous to show that something has been continuing up to the present:

It’s been raining for hours.
We’ve been waiting here since six o’clock this morning.

We use the past perfect to show that something continued up to a time in the past:

When George died he and Anne had been married for nearly fifty years.

... or was important at that time in the past:

I couldn’t get into the house. I had lost my keys.
Teresa wasn’t at home. She had gone shopping.

We use the past perfect continuous to show that something had been continuing up to a time in the past or was important at that time in the past:

Everything was wet. It had been raining for hours.
He was a wonderful guitarist. He had been playing ever since he was a teenager.

We use will with the perfect to show that something will be complete at some time in the future:

In a few years they will have discovered a cure for the common cold.
I can come out tonight. I'll have finished my homework by then.

We use would with the perfect to refer to something that did not happen in the past but would have happened if the conditions had been right:

If you had asked me I would have helped you.
I would have helped you, but you didn’t ask me.
You didn’t ask me or I would have helped you.

We use other modals with perfective aspect when we are looking back from a point in time when something might have happened, should have happened or would have happened.

The point of time may be in the future:

We’ll meet again next week. We might have finished the work by then.
I will phone at six o’clock. He should have got home by then.

the present:

It’s getting late. They should have arrived by now.
He’s still not here. He must have missed his train.

or the past:

I wasn’t feeling well. I must have eaten something bad.
I checked my cell phone. She could have left a message.

 


 

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Comments

Hello kyawphonenaing,

I would guess that the second is probably what is needed. However, the choice of verb form depends on the context in which the sentence is used. Without knowing this context it is impossibe to be sure which is the better option.

The sentence probably needs a definite article:

I have facilitated the software developer in developing a new MIS system for my organization.

Again, however, this is context-dependent and it is not possible to be sure.

Please note that the team here on LearnEnglish provides help with the material on our pages, and explanations of the system of language itself where possible. We do not offer a correction or proofreading service.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I don't understand one of the examples on the page:
"You didn’t ask me or I would have helped you."
are "you didn't ask" me and "I would have helped" you alternatives?
This sentence: "I would have helped you, but you didn’t ask me" - is clear for me. Do both mean the same?

Hello Jarek_O,

The 'or' here is used to mean 'or else'. It's a simple way to show what would have happened under different circumstances. Another way to say this would be:

If you had asked me I would have helped you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello teachers
which one is correct ?
to say :
1 - I have been to bed.
2 - I have gone to bed.

Hello abdelazim yousif,

It would be a bit unusual to say 1, and 2 is quite common. So I'd choose 2 as 'correct'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
He’s still not here. He must have missed his train
shouldn't we say: He’s still not here. He must has missed his train

I think he should come with has, or is there any rule for this?
best regards,

Hello Ahmed,

'have' is the correct form here - 'has' is not. 'have' + past participle is commonly used after a modal verb (like 'must'). See our modals + have and Modals - deduction (past) pages for more on how this grammar works and what it means.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

what is the reason we can't say "They’ve married for nearly fifty years" instead of "They’ve been married for nearly fifty years"??

Hello sherif85,

'marry' is a verb, but it's not used a lot - rather, we usually speak about the act of marriage with the verb 'get' + 'married' (which is the past participle of 'marry', and in this case works as an adjective).

Similarly, when we speak about someone's marital status or how long they've been married, 'married' is an adjective. For this reason, you need to use the verb 'be' - in this case, 'have been' is the verb 'be' in the present perfect tense.

Does that make sense?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello Kirk,
thanks for your answer, i got it now

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