present simple

 

The present tense is the base form of the verb: I work in London.
But the third person (she/he/it) adds an -s: She works in London.

Use

We use the present tense to talk about:

  • something that is true in the present:

I’m nineteen years old.
He lives in London.
I’m a student.

  • something that happens again and again in the present:

I play football every weekend.

We use words like sometimes, often. always, and never (adverbs of frequency) with the present tense:

I sometimes go to the cinema.
She never plays football.

  • something that is always true:

The adult human body contains 206 bones.
Light travels at almost 300,000 kilometres per second.

  

  • something that is fixed in the future.

The school term starts next week.
The train leaves at 1945 this evening.
We fly to Paris next week.

 

Questions and negatives

Look at these questions:

Do you play the piano?
Where do you live?
Does Jack play football?
Where does he come from?
Do Rita and Angela live in Manchester?
Where do they work?

  • With the present tense, we use do and does to make questions. We use does for the third person (she/he/it) and we use do for the others.

 

 We use do and does with question words like where, what and why:

 

 But look at these questions with who:

Who lives in London?
Who plays football at the weekend?
Who works at Liverpool City Hospital?

Look at these sentences:

I like tennis, but I don’t like football. (don’t = do not)
I don’t live in London now.
I don’t play the piano, but I play the guitar.
They don’t work at the weekend.
John doesn’t live in Manchester. (doesn’t = does not)
Angela doesn’t drive to work. She goes by bus.

  • With the present tense we use do and does to make negatives. We use does not (doesn’t) for the third person (she/he/it) and we use do not (don’t) for the others.

Complete these sentences with don’t or doesn’t:

Exercise

Comments

Hello teachers.
Imagine this situation. I'm a football commentator. The palyer shooted and scored a goal.
When I describe this situation, can I say
1. " the player shoots, he scores" or
2. " the player is shooting, he is scoring"

After elapse of 20 min. Can I say
1. " he scored a goal 20 minutes ago"
2. " he has scored for 20 minutes "

I think choice "1" is the right in both situations.

Hello zizo007,

You are correct: the first sentence is the right one in each case.

When commentating on a sports event we use the present simple, not the present continuous as we are describing the whole act (of the pass), not describing it while it is in process but not finished.

We use the past simple rather than the present perfect when there is a finished time reference.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi teachers,
could you tell me what is the difference between
1) I am always getting used to this kind of weathers.
2) I always get used to this kind of weathers.

please explain it in detail with examples

Hi leonardo999,

I'm afraid neither of those sentences are correct. You can only get used to something once; after that, you are used to it. Therefore we would not use 'get used to' with 'always' in this way.  'Weather' is an uncountable noun, and so we would not use it in a plural form.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Okay, what if i correct both of them, could you tell me the difference between them? besides tell me where should i use "always" with " be or get used to".

1) I am getting used to this kind of weather.
2) I get used to this kind of weather.

Anyway, thanks for the correction.

Hello leonardo999,

The difference between the sentences is the difference between the present simple (for repeated or typical actions) and the present continuous (for actions in progress at the moment of speaking). As I said in my first reply, 'get used to' is something that is really only done once; after that we are used to it and do not need to repeat the process. Therefore the second sentence is not one we would normally see.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter M,

that confuses me. You say "'get used to' is something that is really only done once". But as European, if I fly to a region with tropical weather condition, then I have to get used to this condition every single year again and again. And I also have to get used to the jet-lack again and again. What would you say instead of 'get used to'?

Sorry for my english, I am sure I've made some mistakes but I hope you get me right.

Best regards

moox

Hello moox,

Yes, that is a good context for something which we might have to get used to more than once. Normally, we have a situation which is new and we must get used to it, such as a new job, a new colleague, a new town, a change in lifestyle etc. The process of getting used to it happens and then we are used to it and no longer need to get used to it. However, your context is a good one for something which we might need to get used to repeatedly as the 'new' situation is repeated. Usually we would use the continuous form as it is a process, and we would use the simple form only if we are reflecting on what is normal for us:

I get used to the weather very slowly every time I come here.

In this sentence we could use 'always' as a way of emphasising the point:

I always get used to the weather very slowly here.

We would not use 'always' with the continuous form, as in the original sentence.

I hope that clarifies it for you, and thank you for the useful context. By the way, the term is 'jet-lag', not 'jet-lack'.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter M!

Thank you very much for your explanation and your advice!

Best regards

moox

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