We make questions by:

 

1: moving an auxiliary to the front of the clause:

Everybody is watching >> Is everybody watching?
They had worked hard >> Had they worked hard?
He's finished work >> Has he finished work?
Everybody had been working hard >> Had everybody been working hard?
He has been singing >> Has he been singing?
English is spoken all over the world >> Is English spoken all over the world?
The windows have been cleaned >> Have the windows been cleaned?

2: … or by moving a modal to the front of the clause:

They will come >> Will they come?
He might come >> Might he come?
They will have arrived by now >> Will they have arrived by now?
She would have been listening >> Would she have been listening?
The work will be finished soon >> Will the work be finished soon?
They might have been invited to the party >> Might they have been invited to the party?


3: The present simple and the past simple have no auxiliary. We make questions by adding the auxillary do/does for the present simple or did for the past simple:

They live here >> Do they live here?
John lives here >> Does John live here?
Everybody laughed >> Did everybody laugh?

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

my total score is 56 out of 56 100 % , i'm so happy :)

Hello; I would like to know what are the rules on using do and to be in a question.
is there a simple explanation to help a learner choose the right one?
Thank you

Hello me again,

You must use 'do/does' when forming questions in the present simple and use 'did' (which is the past form of 'do') when forming questions in the past simple.

Otherwise, use the auxiliary verb 'be' or 'have' that is part of the other tenses to form questions. For example, the past simple is 'was/were' (='be' in the past) + -ing form so you use 'was/were' in the question. The same is true of, for example, the past perfect ('had' + past participle) – 'had' is used in questions. 

Modal verbs like 'will' and 'can' are a kind of auxiliary verb, so they are also used in questions.

I hope this helps you.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Mr.Peter M,
Thanks for your prompt reply. I need one more clarification.
Is there any difference in meaning and usage of the following sentences?
1. Who will she dance with?
2. Whom will she dance with?
3. With whom will she dance?
Which one is preferred in Spoken English? Please reply. Thanks in advance.

With best regards,
Ravikumar

Hello Daeiou RK,

As I suggested in my first answer, in modern English 'whom' is used less and less frequently. The second sentence here is not one that would be considered standard in modern English. The first is the most frequently used; the third is very formal and unusual.

With reference to your example in your earlier comment, I would also add that we would not use 'much' in the way that you do. We would say 'very much', not only 'much'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sirs,
There are two interrogative sentences:
1.Who does he like much?

2. Whom does he like much?

I think that the first one is preferred by the native speakers and the second one by others.
In the first sentence, there are two subjective pronouns i.e. 'who' and 'he'. How can you justify the presence of two subjects in a sentence without any conjunctions?

With best regards,

Ravikumar

Hello Ravikumar,

The use of 'whom' is slowly disappearing from modern English, and 'who' is becoming used as both the subject and object forms - just as with 'which' for example. 'Whom' sounds very formal to the modern ear.

In modern English 'whom' is now only used consistently when immediately following a preposition: 'to whom' rather than 'to who', for example. Even then, however, most speakers will change the word order and say 'Who.... to?'

 


Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello teachers,

I am from India. Although my mother tongue is Tamizh (Tamil), I love English as it is the language useful to communicate with the rest of the world.
I feel awkward to read some of comments in this site to see 'i' instead of 'I' referring to 'myself' and 'english' instead of 'English' .
Why don't you insist or advise the readers / writers of the comments to at least adopt the basic grammatical rules?

With best regards,

Ravikumar

Hello Ravikumar,

Thanks for your comment. There are several reasons we don't correct users' errors. First, in general, we believe it's better for people to write, even if they make mistakes, than it is for them not to write, so we don't want to discourage it in any way. Also, if we pointed out mistakes, we'd also need to correct them, and we don't offer that kind of service. We're simply too small team of people to be able to do that.

I hope you'll still read and write here in the comments!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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