We make questions by:

 

1: moving an auxiliary to the front of the clause:

Everybody is watching >> Is everybody watching?
They had worked hard >> Had they worked hard?
He's finished work >> Has he finished work?
Everybody had been working hard >> Had everybody been working hard?
He has been singing >> Has he been singing?
English is spoken all over the world >> Is English spoken all over the world?
The windows have been cleaned >> Have the windows been cleaned?

2: … or by moving a modal to the front of the clause:

They will come >> Will they come?
He might come >> Might he come?
They will have arrived by now >> Will they have arrived by now?
She would have been listening >> Would she have been listening?
The work will be finished soon >> Will the work be finished soon?
They might have been invited to the party >> Might they have been invited to the party?


3: The present simple and the past simple have no auxiliary. We make questions by adding the auxillary do/does for the present simple or did for the past simple:

They live here >> Do they live here?
John lives here >> Does John live here?
Everybody laughed >> Did everybody laugh?

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

What is que tag for this

Everybody has a pen. Don't they? Or haven't they?

Considering simple present takes do or does but doubt in has/have cases.

Hello Sunny21parikh,

Both can be used. 'don't they' is the most logical one, as it is the question tag for 'has' in this case, but 'haven't they' is also fine, as it is the question tag for 'has got', which is also possible here.

By the way, we have a page on question tags that might be helpful to you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!

I want to know if "You are Thai, aren't you?" is more appropriate than "Are you Thai?" in the context of one stranger wanting to start a conversation with another. Let's say it is not obvious that the person spoken to is Thai. It is two people waiting for a bus (informal).

I think "You are Thai, aren't you?" sounds more polite, and it seems to invite further conversation. Do you agree?

Which sentence is correct :
Who is the person you recognized at the cinema last night?
Or
Who is the person you had recognized at the cinema last night?

Hello Appy14sep,

The first sentence is almost certainly the correct one. The second one is not grammatically impossible, but would require quite a specific context.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

Why we didn't said the question as " is he finished work? " when the clause was "he's finished work"

Hello Mohannad79,

The form here is present perfect:

He's finished work = He has finished work.

To make the question we use the auxiliary verb 'has' not 'is'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

on the exemple
They will have arrived by now >> Will they have arrived by now?

shouldnt the modal be in past tense in the question? it sounds like it dosent match with arrived.

Hello ljunior,

Modal verbs do not have past forms. There are perfect forms (should have, must have etc), but no past forms. Therefore we say:

You should go there. [referring to the present or future]

You should have gone there. [referring to the past]

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

on a exercise to make questions to given answers
is there a form to recognize the question as for the answer
8. i went to canada three years
is the correct question
1. where were you three years ago?
2. where you went three years ago?
or
3. when you went to canada?

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