We make questions by:

 

1: moving an auxiliary to the front of the clause:

Everybody is watching >> Is everybody watching?
They had worked hard >> Had they worked hard?
He's finished work >> Has he finished work?
Everybody had been working hard >> Had everybody been working hard?
He has been singing >> Has he been singing?
English is spoken all over the world >> Is English spoken all over the world?
The windows have been cleaned >> Have the windows been cleaned?

2: … or by moving a modal to the front of the clause:

They will come >> Will they come?
He might come >> Might he come?
They will have arrived by now >> Will they have arrived by now?
She would have been listening >> Would she have been listening?
The work will be finished soon >> Will the work be finished soon?
They might have been invited to the party >> Might they have been invited to the party?


3: The present simple and the past simple have no auxiliary. We make questions by adding the auxiliary do/does for the present simple or did for the past simple:

They live here >> Do they live here?
John lives here >> Does John live here?
Everybody laughed >> Did everybody laugh?

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hi Learn English Team

In the sentence, "The windows have been cleaned" Can anyone please help me to figure out verb tense. If it is in Present present continuous form then have been cleaning can be used.

Please help me to learn grammar.

Thanks,
Krishna

Hi Krishna,

The verb form 'have been cleaned' is a present perfect passive form. Here is the sentence in active and passive form:

Someone has cleaned the windows. [active]

The windows have been cleaned (by someone). [passive]

 

You can make a continuous form here:

Someone has been cleaning the windows. [active]

This would suggest that the cleaning is not finished yet. The passive equivalent is possible but is unusual because it becomes a very long verb phrase which we tend to avoid:

The windows have been being cleaned (by someone). [passive]

 

You can read more about passive forms here. This page deals with the present perfect and this page looks at the difference between the present perfect simple and continuous.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello LearnEnglish Team!

Here is a question about something I've been researching for a while but I haven't found a satisactory answer.

Should we say: Where did you move or where did you move TO?
Where did you get or where did you get TO?
I'm aware of the rule that says that you should turn it into an affirmative sentence but I'm afraid that doesn't really help me.
You moved WHERE? or You moved TO WHERE?
You got WHERE? or You got TO WHERE?
I couldn't really pick one over the other.

Thank you in advance
François Fiset

Hello François,

This is really a question of convention and usage rather than grammatical rules. I can't give you a rule which can be applied in all cases but I can tell you which of the forms you mention are the more common in normal use. These are as follows:

 

'Where did you move to?' is the normal form. You may hear 'Where did you move?' but it is be much less common.

 

'Where did you get to?' and 'You got to where?' are the normal forms. I would not say that 'Where did you get?' or 'Where' are correct forms.

 

'You moved where?' is the most common form. A person might say 'You moved to where?' only as a very emphatic form, suggesting disbelief or amazement.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello LearnEnglish Team!

Here is a question about something I've been researching for a while but I haven't found a satisactory answer.

Should we say: Where did you move or where did you move TO?
Where did you get or where did you get TO?
I'm aware of the rule that says that you should turn it into an affirmative sentence but I'm afraid that doesn't really help me.
You moved WHERE? or You moved TO WHERE?
You got WHERE? or You got TO WHERE?
I couldn't really pick one over the other.

Thank you in advance
François Fiset

Very Good.

Hi
If the affirmative sentence is, "Everybody stood up and clapped", what would be the interrogative structure: "Did everybody stand up and clapped" or "Did everybody stand up and clap"?

Hello Adya's,

The second one is the correct one -- the auxiliary verb 'did' is omitted before 'clap', but is understood to be there.

No worries about the multiple posts. We monitor all comments before they are published, so we just deleted them. But thanks for letting us know.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks Peter M.

So, does it mean that for the 'Simple Present' statements, which do have an auxiliary verb as the main verb in it , we can't make question with 'DO/DOES'. Therefore, we have to use auxiliary verb in those statements to form the question.

Please explain with the following examples
1) I’m nineteen years old.
2) My name is John
3) You are welcome

Thanks in Advance !

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