1. When we know about the future we normally use the present tense.

  • We use the present simple for something scheduled or arranged:

We have a lesson next Monday.
The train arrives at 6.30 in the morning.
The holidays start next week.
It is my birthday tomorrow.

  • We can use the present continuous for plans or arrangements:

I’m playing football tomorrow.
They are coming to see us tomorrow.
We’re having a party at Christmas.

2. We use will to talk about the future:

  • When we make predictions:

It will be a nice day tomorrow.
I think Brazil will win the World Cup.
I’m sure you will enjoy the film.

  • To mean want to or be willing to:

I hope you will come to my party.
George says he will help us.

  • To make offers and promises:

I'll see you tomorrow.
We'll send you an email.

  • To talk about offers and promises:

Tim will be at the meeting.
Mary will help with the cooking.

3. We use (be) going to:

  • To talk about plans and intentions:

I’m going to drive to work today.
They are going to move to Manchester.

  • When we can see that something is likely to happen:

Be careful! You are going to fall.
Look at those black clouds. I think it’s going to rain.


4. We often use verbs like would like, plan, want, mean, hope, expect to talk about the future:

What are you going to do next year? I’d like to go to University.
We plan to go to France for our holidays.
George wants to buy a new car.

5. We use modals may, might, and could when we are not sure about the future:

I might stay at home tonight, or I might go to the cinema.
We could see Mary at the meeting. She sometimes goes.

6. We can use should if we think something is likely to happen:

We should be home in time for tea.
The game should be over by eight o’clock.

7. Clauses with time words:

In clauses with time words like when, after, and until we often use a present tense form to talk about the future:

I’ll come home when I finish work.
You must wait here until your father comes.
They are coming after they have had dinner.

8. Clauses with if:

In clauses with if we often use a present tense form to talk about the future:

We won’t be able to go out if it rains.
If Barcelona win tomorrow they will be champions.

WARNING: We do not normally use will in clauses with if or with time words:

I’ll come home when I will finish work.
We won’t be able to go out if it will rain rains.

But we can use will if it means a promise or offer:

I will be very happy if you will come to my party.
We should finish the job early if George will help us.

9. We can use the future continuous instead of the present continuous or going to for emphasis when we are talking about plans, arrangements and intentions:

They’ll be coming to see us next week.
I will be driving to work tomorrow.

 

 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hello Team. I try to make an example question regarding this lesson and then I have a doubt to answer it. Could you help me, please?
If I get an email, job's offer from a company and they want me to come for test, which ones of these sentences is correct to answer the email?
1. Thank you, I'm coming to the schedul test next week.
2. Thank you, I'll be coming to the schedul test next week.
3. Thank you, I'll come to the schedul text next week.
--------------------
or any idea? Thank you very much.

Hello Nizam,

If you're accepting an invitation, it's as if you are making a decision at the time of speaking, so 3 is the best option of the three you propose. 1 and 2 could cause confusion, as if you had already planned to go before they invited you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again Team.
Thank you very much Kirk. I'm really appreciate your help though, I still need your explaining. How about in this case, I'like to show him that I'm very excited to the job offer. So, I want to add more emphasis in my sentence.
As the lesson above, we can use "the future continues" or "going to" for emphasis.
What about this one :
4. Thank you, I'm going to be coming to the schedule test next week.
Is it correct or not? or 3 is still the best answer?
Thank you very much.

Hello Nizam,

I wouldn't recommend you use 'am going to be coming'. If you want to emphasise how pleased you are, you could say something like 'I'm very happy to come in next week' or 'Thank you. I look forward to coming in to take the test next Thursday ...'

You might want to look through our English for Emails section, which covers similar content. It might not help you with this specific situation, but you might find it useful in general.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk.
I'm sorry for my stupid question. I know now the reason why you didn't recommend me with 1,2 and 4.
Yes, we're talking about promising not talking about planing again.
And I also say thank you for pointing me your lesson topic "English for Email section"
Although it's a bit little out of what we are discussing.
Thank you again.

Hello there,
I'd like to know if the sentence below is grammatically correct.
"He's always telling me what to do"
It seems me like a mixture of present simple n present continuous.
Thanks.

Hello Zain Shapiro,

Yes, that sentence is perfectly fine. We can use adverbs of frequency like 'always' and 'forever' with continuous forms. It generally suggests that we do not like the action being described:

She's always criticising me.

My boss is forever asking me to work overtime.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

choose
The movie is very interesting I'm sure you(will-are going to)enjoy it.

Hello Adiliii,

I'm afraid we don't provide answers to tasks and questions from elsewhere. If we did then we would end up doing everyone's homework and tests for them!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

The statement is showing something which is not sure in future. And there are two complete statements.
We could see Mary at the meeting. She sometimes goes.
If I mention one statement : We could see Mary at the meeting.
Then what does it convey? Is it - Mary was surely seen in the meeting which happened in the past???
And if it is yes, then isn't it odd an entirely different statement is changing the time perspective of another statement which in itself is complete.
It would have been OK, if these statements were rather phrases.

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