The verb be has the following forms:

Present simple: Affirmative I am
You are
He/She/It is
We are
You are
They are
  Question form: Am I?
Are you?
Is he/she it?
Are we?
Are you?
Are they?
  Negative: I am not/ I’m not
You are not/ aren’t
He/She/It is not/ isn’t
We are not/aren’t
You are not/aren’t
They are not/aren't
 
Past simple   I was
You were
He/She/It was
We were
You were
They were
The past participle:   been.  
Present perfect:   has/have been  
Past perfect:   had been  

 The verb be is used in the following patterns:

1. with a noun:

My mother is a teacher.
Bill Clinton was the president of the US.

2. with an adjective:

This soup is very tasty.
The children were good.

2.1 with the -ing form to make the continuous aspect

We were walking down the street.
Everything was wet. It had been raining for hours.

2.2 with the -ed form to make the passive voice

The house was built in 1890.
The street is called Montagu Street.
This car was made in Japan.

3. with a prepositional phrase:

John and his wife are from Manchester.
The flowers are on the table.

 

 

 

 

 

Section: 

Comments

Hello,
I wanted to ask if it is correct to change the second part of a conditional sentence instead of the first one (regarding 'if' and 'unless').e.g.
If you don't read, you won't succeed.
Unless you read, you will fail.
I know that the second sentence is more correct if we say "unless you read, you won't succeed."
Thank You

Hello bakhtiar85,

I think all of those are perfectly grammatically correct. In terms of grammar, none of them are more or less correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Sir
Please tell me which sentence is correct.
Being a rainy day I didn't go to school.
It being a rainy day I didn't go to school.
Being a poor boy he couldn't do higher studies.
He being a poor boy couldn't do higher studies.
Thank you.

Hello Andrew International,

Being a rainy day, I didn't go to school. - not correct; it suggests that 'I' am a rainy day

It being a rainy day I didn't go to school. - correct

Being a poor boy he couldn't do higher studies. - correct

He, being a poor boy, couldn't do higher studies. - correct, but required commas

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much for your explanation. Please tell me whether the following sentences are correct.
He, being a poor boy, couldn't do higher studies = He was a poor boy so he couldn't do higher studies./ He is a poor boy so he couldn't do higher studies.(He is still alive)

Hello andrew international,

Both of those sentences are correct. In the first sentence the boy may be alive or dead, though the sentence is about his past. The second sentence is about the present.

 


Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
Which sentence is grammatically correct:
" when is giving charity publicly better? and when giving it secretly better?" or " when is giving charity publicly better, and when giving it secretly better?"

Regards,
Abdullah

Hello zagrus,

The only different I can see is the positon of the question mark, which should come at the end of the sentence. However, we would usually add 'is' to the second part of the sentence:

When is giving charity publicly better, and when is giving it secretly better?"

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
I know that the phrase " someone is into something" means what field a person works in. For example, " I am into education" means I work in the field of education. However, I heard that it can also be used to say what a person is interested in. For instance, " He is into football". My question is: How can I determine which meaning is meant in case this phrase is used to have both meanings as sometimes both meanings can be correct. For example, if I say " I am into football" how would the listener know whether I mean I am working in the field of football, or I am just interested in football?

Best wishes,
Abdullah

Hello Abdullah,

As far as I know, 'I am into X' only means that X interests me – it doesn't refer to a field that I work in. You could perhaps say 'I'm in computers' to refer to working with computers, but notice that is 'in' instead of 'into'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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