Common verbs followed by –ing nouns are:

Verbs of liking and disliking:

  • detest
  • dislike
  • enjoy
  • hate
  • fancy
  • like
  • love

I love swimming but I hate jogging.
They always enjoyed visiting their friends.
A: Do you fancy going for a walk?
B: I wouldn’t mind

Phrases with mind:

  • wouldn’t mind (= would like)
  • don’t mind (= I am willing to)
  • would you mind (= will you please…?)

I wouldn’t mind having some fish and chips.
I don’t mind waiting for a few minutes.
Would you mind holding this for me?

Verbs of saying and thinking:

  • admit
  • consider
  •  deny
  • imagine
  • remember
  • suggest

Our guide suggested waiting until the storm was over.
Everyone denied seeing the accident.

Other common verbs are:

  • avoid
  • begin
  • finish
  • keep
  • miss
  • practise
  • risk
  • start
  • stop

I haven’t finished writing this letter.
Let’s practise speaking English.

Passive form of -ing

Many of these verbs are sometimes followed by the passive form of -ing: being + past participle

I don’t like being interrupted.
Our dog loves being stroked under the chin.

Noun + -ing clause

Some verbs are followed by a noun and an -ing clause:

Verbs to do with the senses:

  • see
  • watch
  • hear
  • smell
  • listen to
  • etc.

We saw everybody running away.
I could hear someone singing.
 

Other common verbs:

  • catch
  • find
  • imagine
  • leave
  • prevent
  • stop

I caught someone trying to break into my house.
We couldn’t prevent them getting away.
 

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Dear Pete,
Thank you very much for your lucid answer.
This sentence was my second one and When I wrote it I thought It should be "corresponded" but I was incorrect.
Students should be refrained from using the internet and should complete their studies before finding a job corresponded to their studies.
 (Jobs which are corresponded to their studies.) having this form in my thought process , I made a mistake.
 
A few days ago ,I wrote my first sentence in a similar form ,which was as follows:
Once student complete their studies, they can apply for jobs related to their fields. ( jobs which are related to their field - this one is passive and it is correct. )
 
Jobs was an immovable object so I thought passive form could be possible in both sentences.
The first sentence had acted as a guideline for me so I wrote the second one in the same fashion which was incorrect.  
Would you please tell me what do you think of it.( why in one sentence "jobs" are considered as active and in the other as passive?) 
Do you think that the word choice was inappropriate?
By this I mean if I had written related instead of corresponded  in the second sentence ,it would have been considered grammatically correct .
 
Best wishes,
Livon

Hi Livon,

job is a noun, and so it doesn't have active or passive forms - only verbs have active or passive forms. correspond is the verb in active form that becomes corresponding; related is derived from the verb relate, but is an adjective in your first sentence. So yes, in your second sentence, it would be correct to say related to their studies.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Kirk,
Thank you very much for your response.
Best wishes,
Livon

Hi everyone,
Can you please help me with this sentence? Is it grammatically wrong? (I mean ing usage of clarifying)

“There are very few case studies about Malpasset arch dam clarifying the real cause of failure”

Thanks a lot.

Hi Thai

The sentence should have a definite article (‘about the Malpasset arch dam’), but is fine grammatically apart from that. Some people might prefer, from a stylistic point of view, to use a relative clause (…which clarify the real…), but that’s a personal preference, not a grammatical correction.
 
Best wishes
 
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

i want to ask you about this sentence:
"I'm dying trying not to drag my feet"
why on this sentence, there are two verb-ing/present participle?
thanks then :)

Hello jessy58!
 
Well, that's a slightly odd sentence! Is it from a song?
 
The first -ing is part of the main verb in the present continuous (I'm dying), while the second part is a gerund (trying). It's not really grammatical, because we don't normally follow dying with a gerund, but you do hear this kind of structure in speech. There are correct uses of it, too. For example, 'enjoy' is followed by a gerund:
 
I am enjoying reading this book.

Hope that helps!
 
Regards
 
Jeremy Bee
The LearnEnglish Team 

Hello jessy58!
 
Well, that's a slightly odd sentence! Is it from a song?
 
The first -ing is part of the main verb in the present continuous (I'm dying), while the second part is a gerund (trying). It's not really grammatical, because we don't normally follow dying with a gerund, but you do hear this kind of structure in speech. There are correct uses of it, too. For example, 'enjoy' is followed by a gerund:
 
I am enjoying reading this book.

Hope that helps!
 
Regards
 
Jeremy Bee
The LearnEnglish Team 

Hi,
how do I know if an active "verb + noun +ing" sentence can be transformed into passive voice.
They saw the monkey climbing over the wall. =
The monkey was seen climbing over the wall.
but not:
I remember the monkey climbing over the wall. =
The monkey is remembered climbing over the wall.

Hi there
I would be grateful if you help.
Which sentence is correct and why?
1) I'm looking forward to walking down the memory lane/red carpet etc?
                                              or
2)I'm looking forward to walk down the memory lane/red carpet etc?
Would appreciate your help!
Thanks n kind regards

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