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hello sir,
i did not understand the of following sentence.

"he knew, i wasn't got to let him do it. he was just trying it on".

I'm confused about the portion of the sentence ( i wasn't got to) is it passive? if so what is the meaning of this. Does it has any reason to use it here? or any special structure?

i looked up this phrase 'get to' in dictionary accordingly some popular dictionaries ' get to ' means ' be able to or manage to do...' and also it is never used in passive.

please explain this sentence and its meaning especially that portion which is mentioned above.

Hello ahmednagar,

I'm afraid that sentence does not look correct to me, though it could, I suppose, be a dialectical variant. It looks to me like it should be 'wasn't going to' not 'wasn't got to'.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Excuse me, how do I get the verb machine?, do I have to download from any link.?..where is it.?
Thanks.

Hello lumibe,

You can see the verb machine on the page above these comments. For instructions, click the '?' in the round button in the middle of the game window.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello
I don't find this page , i don' t see round button or" ?"
Thanks for your help

Hello maryse 974,

If you can't see the game at all then it may be a compatibility problem. The game requires Flash-compatibility, which is often lacking on mobile devices such as phones and tablets. Please try accessing the site via a different device to see if this solves the problem for you.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks Peter

Hello sir,
Am confused of 'might' some one says its the past form of may but I read on net there is no difference between may and might and they say you can use might for less possibility ......please clear me where to use and when to use might. Is it present or past? Give me some examples.

Hello Ajaz ajju,

'Might' and 'may' are two separate modal verbs. They are similar in meaning in most contexts; both have present or future meanings, like most modal verbs. To refer to the past we can use a perfect form: 'might have + past participle' and 'may have + past participle'.

The only time 'might' is used as a past form of 'may' is in polite requests. See this page for more information and examples. For more information on the use of various modal verbs, including 'may' and 'might' take a look at our section on modal verbs.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello sir i have come across some special uses of 'HAVE' and expression won't have (or will not have) +object + ing form
i.e
i will not have you smoking in the classroom.( means i will not allow you to smoke in the class room) i understood this expression.

my question is that when we use 'won't have + object+ past participle'
i.e
1) i won't have him spoken to like that.
2) i won't have my name dragged through the dirt by press.

are these sentences passive? or what is the exact meaning of that sentences and in which circumstances we can use that kind of structure.
thanks advanced.

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