First motorcycles are like first loves; you never forget them. My first motorbike was a blue 175cc BSA Bantam and I fell in love at first sight.

Motorcycles

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Motorcycles

By Nik Peachey

It had the standard BSA chrome petrol tank with the BSA insignia on each side. It was already older than I was. It had been built in the early 60s at a time when the British motorcycle industry was at its peak. By the 80's though when I bought my BSA everyone else was riding Hondas, Yamahas or Kawasakis and names like Royal Enfield, Sunbeam, Norton and Matchless were a thing of the past. Triumph was the only remaining producer left to continue Britain's history of motorcycle manufacturing and it was having serious financial problems. The bikes it was producing were slow and unreliable compared to Japanese models and only die-hard British bikers were prepared to buy them.

At that time in Britain every biker's hero was Barry Sheene. He had become famous by winning the World 500cc Motor Cycle Championship two years running in 1976 and 1977, but that wasn't all. He was young and handsome and despite some terrible accidents on the track he always came back to racing. In Daytona, Florida, he crashed at 175mph. He broke his thigh, wrist and collarbone, but he was riding again within six weeks. At one point he had metal plates in both knees, 28 screws in his legs and a bolt in his left wrist, but none of this could keep him away from the sport and the motorcycles that he loved. He later had a career as a TV presenter and even managed to shrug off his biker image to sing in the opera Tosca at Covent Garden alongside Maria Callas and Tito Gobbi.

After riding my BSA to work for a few weeks I discovered why the British motorcycle industry had collapsed. It broke down almost every week and I was eventually forced to buy a Japanese bike, but, despite this, I still kept the BSA for another fifteen years, although it spent most of that time in my garage.

I haven't ridden a motorbike for many years now, but it was with real sadness that I heard that Barry Sheene had died of cancer. Within days of this I also read that there had been a fire at the Triumph factory in Leicestershire and that much of the production equipment along with many of the bikes had been destroyed. For a while I felt that something of my youth was gone forever, but like Barry Sheene Triumph keep coming back and they have now, after an absence of almost thirty years, returned to competitive road racing. I saw one of their new bikes a few weeks ago and it looked good. It had something of the old classic Boneville about it, but with a huge 900cc engine. I felt my heart begin to race again and I could almost imagine myself on the tarmac at Brands Hatch. Somehow though I don't think I have enough of my youth left to sell my comfortable car and brave the British weather on a motorbike again. Some things are better left to younger men, or women

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good afternoon

The motorcycles for me are great, my first motorcycle I had when I was sixteen years old was a 125cc ts and little by little I was changing it for a better and better, today I have a PULSAR 200cc and I've been with it for four years and it's amazing the economy and Good that has resulted, but I do not think to stay there, since I wish to have a 500 cc, for this reason I incline to study motorcycles, they call my attention always.
I congratulate the writer for his article because when in life he feels like something is not lost so years go by

Motorcycles are dangerous I have two daughter's and two son's My son used to have a motorcycle but nowadays he 's using a car. I'm happy because of that and no more afraid.

Motrocycles are dangerous I have two daughther's and two son's 
My son used to have a motorcycle but nowadays he 's using a car.
I'm happy because of that and no more afraid.
 

it is very much essential,,,,,,,,,,

Your texts:

Baseer writes “My First Motorcycle: I was 18 years old when I started my job for an export company. The company wanted a person who had a motorcycle, so I purchased a motorcycle from Akbar Road in Karachi, Pakistan. My motorcycle was a Sohrab, 70cc 1995 model. I was really happy because using public transport is really difficult here because it takes time to arrive somewhere, so you can save much time by using a motorcycle. Also a motorcycle is less expensive than public transport, taxies and other private transports. On average my motorcycle would go 60km per litre of petrol, which meant Rs.0.50/km (0.0043 GBP!), which was very cheap for me.”

Zahra Pedram writes “Although it's really difficult for me to understand the relation between "love" and a "motorbike”, I respect the writer's opinion and thank him for helping me to improve my knowledge of English through this text!”

Eric Ramirez Rodriguez writes “I disagree that Barry Sheene was a hero. A hero is somebody who commits an act of remarkable bravery or who has shown great courage, strength of character, or another admirable quality. Somebody who is admired and looked up to for outstanding qualities or achievements. Barry Sheene won the World 500cc Motor Cycle Championship two years running in 1976 and 1977 (Were those outstanding achievements?), but had some terrible accidents on the track (if he had had outstanding quality, he would not have had accidents) and he always came back to racing (Is that an act of remarkable bravery, great courage, strength of character, or an admirable quality? For me, it was stupidity). In Daytona, Florida, he crashed at 175mph. He broke his thigh, wrist and collarbone, but he was riding again within six weeks (Once again, if he had had outstanding qualities, he would not have had accidents) At one point he had metal plates in both knees, 28 screws in his legs and a bolt in his left wrist, but none of this could keep him away from the sport and the motorcycles that he loved (Once again, was that an act of remarkable bravery, great courage, strength of character, or an admirable quality? For me, it was stupidity).”

Vladimir Prochazka writes “I appreciate that this article is written very clearly and understandably. It must touch every man's heart. The author describes the real story of his life. But is this only his story? I think it could be also our story. Of course, the article is especially about British motorbike history. Actually, the subject is not important. More important is the theme: nostalgia, our youth and mainly our heroes - the men or women who help us to keep on, to live and try to be better.

Diana Botsoroga writes “Motorcycles … this word means to me an interesting adventure, hope, travelling, freedom, and, of course, danger. As I am a girl, I’m just afraid to ride a motorcycle, but sometimes I think how it would be to ride one and I start dreaming that I’m wearing a red suit, and I’m riding a red motorcycle. I feel free, nobody can hurt me, everybody admires me and I’m proud of myself. Bun when I wake up and I realize that this was a dream, I understand that this will never happen because this is very dangerous for a girl.”

Bao Tan writes “I don't specialize in motorcycles but the article above makes me deeply curious. The author must be a motorbike addict, and he was always loyal to British motorbike brands. Despite using Japanese bikes, he has been keeping his own dear bike in the garage for 15 years although it takes lots of time to preserve. For him, a motorbike is not only a form of transportation but also a close friend. Looking at the last passage, I can see how sorry he is when hearing about Barry Sheene's death, and about the Triumph factory's bankruptcy ... it seems like someone has taken his youth away forever. But Barry Sheene Triumph's return after 30 years absence really helped him come back to a good mood, the hi-tech in a classic model satisfied him a lot. I have never seen someone who fancies motorbikes as much as this author, everybody has a target to pursue and keep your mind if it's right for you.”

Moe Moe Kyaw writes “I think that it is quite an interesting article about the British motorcycle and its history. For me, I am not interested in motorcycles but I have never seen the old BSA motorcycle which was comparatively bigger than modern Japanese ones. I was rather attracted by the story of the bikers' hero, Barry Sheene.The author himself seems very fond of motorcycles, especially British ones. I can empathize with his feeling that he felt something of his youth was forever gone when he heard the news of the bikers' hero's death and the fire accident at the Triumph factory. I feel like I was young again when I rehear and re-read the music and the novels of my young days.”

Mohammad Monzurul Haque writes “This article gives some idea about the motor cycle industry in England and the attraction of motor bikes, which are referred to as the first love. Youths are always ready to take challenges and can overcome the obstacles if that is about first love.”