A world like no other – perhaps this is the best way to describe the world of the rainforest. No rainforest is exactly the same, but they all have a role to play in maintaining the world as we know it.

Magazine - Rainforests rule!

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Rainforests rule!

by Claire Powell

A world like no other – perhaps this is the best way to describe the world of the rainforest. No rainforest is exactly the same – yet most rainforests are now distributed in the small land area 22.5 degrees north and 22.5 degrees south of the Equator, between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. You can find tropical rainforests in South America and Indonesia. Other rainforests flourish further from the Equator, in Thailand and Sri Lanka.

Despite occupying a relatively small area, rainforests have a colossal role to play in maintaining the world as we know it. Tropical rainforests are home to a rich, colourful variety of medicinal plants, food, birds and animals. Can you believe that a single bush in the Amazon may have more species of ants than the whole of Britain! 480 varieties of trees may be found in just one hectare of rainforest. These forests sustain around 50% of all the species on Earth, and offer a way of life to many people living in and around the forest.

Rainforests are the lungs of the planet – storing vast quantities of carbon dioxide and producing a significant amount of the world’s oxygen. Rainforests have their own perfect system for ensuring their own survival; the tall trees make a canopy of branches and leaves which protect themselves, smaller plants, and the forest animals from heavy rain, intense dry heat from the sun and strong winds.

Amazingly, the trees grow in such a way that their leaves and branches, although close together, never actually touch those of another tree. Scientists think this is a deliberate tactic to prevent the spread of any tree diseases and make life more difficult for leaf-eating insects like caterpillars. To survive in the forest, animals must climb, jump, fly or glide across the gaps. The ground floor of the forest is not all tangled leaves and bushes, like in films, but is actually fairly clear. It is where leaves decompose into food for the trees and other forest life.

They are not called rainforests for nothing! Rainforests can generate 75% of their own rain. At least 80 inches of rain a year is normal – and in some areas there may be as much as 430 inches of rain annually. This is real rain – your umbrella may protect you in a shower, but it won’t keep you dry if there is a full rainstorm. In just two hours, streams can rise ten to twenty feet. The humidity of large rainforests contributes to the formation of rainclouds that may travel to other countries in need of rain.

Worryingly, rainforests around the world are disappearing at an alarming rate, thanks to deforestation, river pollution, and soil erosion as land is being claimed for agriculture and trees are felled for wood. A few thousand years ago, tropical rainforests covered as much as 12% of the land surface on Earth, but today this has fallen to less than 5.3%.

We can only hope that the world governments work together with environmentalists and businesses to use their environmental knowledge and power to preserve the rainforests – awe-inspiring, beautiful and vital for our existence.

 

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In this article the rainforests produce the oxygen and help countries to get rain, so this two things are vital for human, so we must preserve these rainforests if we want to still alive.

Hello all,

I would say, survival of all living species on this globe is firmly impossible without existence of these great rain-forests, as we've already studied above that these rain-forests are the lungs of this earth as well as they store enormous pile of green house gas and generate huge amount of oxygen for us systematically. I'm wondered, thankful and grateful to this amazing phenomenon of nature for giving us blessed lives.

Moreover, I thoroughly agree with the writer and pay lot of regards for bringing a lot of meaningful information for us to realize that our most kind rain-forests have been depleting gradually since long and it is also indicating us to be attentive to do something special for those who have been giving us cause to breath.

Furthermore, I do believe that we all, government and non-government organisations must have to take very serious steps as we know this has now become our predominant duty to consider profoundly that how could we conserve and increase the number of these vulnerable rain-forests on prompt.

best wishes...

I do not know why people cut down trees.In my opinion the writer in this article want to show how important rainforest are for us and if we keep doing this we will destroy themself.The nature always was awe-inspiring,beautiful,vital for our existance.We should find desire and strength to preserve them from destraction.Thanks for this wise story .....

I`m agree with writer.not only the rainforests ,but also all off the forests are being destroyed because of egoism of human!Many of Oakforests are in many countries destroyed or being destroyed because of the dust,soil erosion,excessive use of human and death of ecosystem and etc..As the writer said:" We can only hope that the world governments work together with environmentalists and businesses to use their environmental knowledge and power to preserve the rainforests – awe-inspiring, beautiful and vital for our existence "

We should be very careful about saving the rainforests for our future.