The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following are correct:
1) The expression " who cares?" can be used in order to say that something is not important? is it polite to say it?
2) A good way to practise for a presentation at work/at the office (in front of other colleagues) is to read aloud your presentation at home, where you are alone. The questions here are: to read aloud or loudly? and 2) where you are alone or by yourself?
Thank you in advance

Hi anie2,

Yes, that is correct and it means what you say. It would be impolite in most contexts, however, so I'd suggest care in using it.

You could say 'read your presentation aloud' or 'read your presentation out loud' here -- they mean the same thing. Both 'where you are alone' and 'by yourself' are also correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following are correct;
1.If someone is from Spain/Italy/France for example, and he/she speaks English with a good accent or a good pronunciation? almost like a native
accent or pronunciation? is the correct word and is there any difference between these two words?
2. Is it ok, to say; I do not know any maths/physics, but it happens to know that( this equation, for example). Is the phrase it happens to know, correct?
3. When I explain or describe something to someone, is it polite to use the phrase, you follow? instead of saying, do you understand?
Thank you in advance

Hello again anie2,

1 – In general, having a good 'accent' or 'pronunciation' would mean the same thing. I would probably say 'Their pronunciation is very good' or 'They have a good accent' or 'They sound like a native speaker'.

2 – I don't understand what 'it happens to know' means here. If I said something like 'I don't really know maths, but I happen to know this equation', that would mean that I know an equation but in general am not good with maths.

3 – In very informal contexts, that would be OK, but in general, 'OK?' or 'Do you understand?' are fairly universally appropriate.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct and if both are correct what is the difference between them. If a person was born in Italy for example, is he a native Italian speaker? or an Italian native speaker?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

There is a difference in meaning, I would say.

A native Italian speaker means a native speaker of the Italian language.

An Italian native speaker means a native speaker of a language who is Italian. Which language this is will depend on the context. It could mean 'a native speaker of English who is Italian' – someone who has Italian nationality but who was brought up in the UK, for example.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for your answer,
If I have understood correctly, in the first case, the native Italian speaker means a person who was born in Italy and speaks Italian?
Thank you

Hello anie2,

Yes, a person who was born in Italy and speaks Italian would be described as a native Italian speaker. You could also call them a native speaker of Italian.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

I would like to ask which one is the most correct:

When I went into the house, I heard an old man shout my name.
When I went into the house, I heard an old man shouting my name.

Can you also explain why in certain conditions gerunds are necessary?Thank you in advance.

Hello Callista,

Both are correct, but there is a difference in the meaning.

In the first sentence (shout), the man is not shouting before you go in; he begins when you enter (perhaps because you enter).

In the second sentence (shouting), the man is already shouting when you go in. The suggestion is that he was shouting your name before you entered, but you only realised this once you were inside.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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