Series 03 Episode 17

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Tess and Ravi talk about a very famous British family and Adam passes on your kind words to Carolina.

1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Language level: 
Task 2

Match the names to the descriptions, according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

Task 3

Write the numbers of the kings and queens (in words) into the spaces.

Exercise

Task 4

Drag the words into the right spaces.

Exercise

Task 5

Read these sentences about Emily and Roy's family and put the words in the spaces.

Exercise

Task 6

A logic problem. Read the information and the clues and type the names in the spaces.

Exercise

Task 7

Drag the words into the right spaces.

Exercise

Task 8

Write the missing words in the spaces. Use 'older', 'oldest', 'younger' or 'youngest'.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

Do you live in a country which has a king or queen? Did you have to learn the names of kings and queens in history at school? Are the names for family members more specific in your language than in English? And do tell us about your family!

Adam

Adam: Hello and welcome to Episode 16 of Series 4 of LearnEnglish Elementary Podcasts. My name is Adam and my colleague Jo will be joining us later to talk about some of the language from the podcast.

Last time we heard Tess and Ravi talking about Sherlock Holmes, a famous British detective. Or perhaps I should say a famous British fictional detective. As Ravi explained, Sherlock Holmes wasn't a real person – he was actually a character in stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Zafarbek from Uzbekistan wrote in to say thank you for the information! Zafarbek loves Sherlock Holmes films but didn't know that Sherlock Holmes wasn't a real detective. Don’t worry, Zafarbek, even when Doyle was writing the original stories 120 years ago, people thought he was real then.

Abdulazim Saffaf from Syria says 'I thought he was a real person until I listened to this podcast!' Abdulazim also said that he's just bought a hat like Sherlock's hat and so all his friends call him Sherlock Holmes. You don't see many hats like that these days, Abdulazim – and it's called a 'deerstalker' by the way, because people used to wear them when they were hunting deer.

Ypf1083 is new to the website – welcome! – and says 'I've read most of the books about Sherlock Holmes and I love them. He's one of my favorite characters'. Me, too. And britishlearner from Guinea remembers hearing about Sherlock Holmes for the first time in one of the jokes from the first series of the podcast (Series 1 Episode 2 actually, britishlearner – you've got a good memory!) and also in an episode of Word on the Street, when Ashley tried to solve a crime.

Zara Zieno from Syria isn't very keen on Sherlock Holmes. She once tried to watch it with her brother but had to stop because it was very frightening. But Zara really likes a series called Detective Conan, and a lot of you wrote in to say the same thing – Detective Conan is obviously very popular, even though I've never heard of him!

So thank you to Wuri Koes and Arum Adriani, both from Indonesia, for writing in and explaining a bit about it. As Wuri Koes explains, Detective Conan is a Japanese manga series. It's about a clever student who helps the police solve crimes. His enemies give him a poison that turns him into a child, but he carries on solving crimes secretly and calls himself Conan after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who wrote the Sherlock Holmes books. And, as Arum Adriana says, there are some similarities between Sherlock Holmes and Detective Conan and the way they solve their cases, perhaps because the writer, Gosho Aoyama, is a big Holmes fan.

Speaking of other fictional detectives, Laura 1240 from Italy said 'Ever since I was a child I've always loved Agatha Christie and her private Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, but I like Miss Marple very much too. I've read almost all her books, and watched all the movies and TV series based on her characters and I really, really love them all!'

Great comments everyone – please keep writing them. And don't forget about the Elementary Podcast app. Follow the link from the LearnEnglish website or go to the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store to get it.

And now it's time to catch up with Carolina and her friends. It's coming to the end of the academic year, everyone's busy with exams – and some people have some important decisions to make about their future. Let's see what's happening ...

 

Carolina – After the exam

Fellow student: Phew. That was difficult.

Carolina: Yes, it was. Did you do question four? The one about South America?

Fellow student: The one about the Atlantic coast? God no. That was really complicated. Why? Did you?

Carolina: Yes. I thought it was quite easy. Oh dear.

Fellow student: Coming for lunch?

Carolina: Yes, um, oh, um, just a minute, I've got a voice message.

Jamie: Hi. It's me. I need to speak to you. It's really important. I'm in an exam until one. Meet me outside the lecture block after that.

Carolina: Oh. Well, no, I can't come for lunch, Sally. Sorry. I've got to meet someone.

Fellow student: OK. See you tomorrow.

Carolina: Yeah, bye …

 

Carolina: So, Jamie? What is it?

Jamie: Wait a minute. Let's find somewhere to sit down.

Carolina: Can't you tell me now? Is it something terrible?

Jamie: Do you want to go somewhere for lunch?

Carolina: No. Let's sit down here. Now. On the grass.

Jamie: Phew. It's really hot. I told you British weather isn't always terrible.

Carolina: Jamie! I know you British talk about the weather all the time – but not now! Why did you want to see me? Tell me now.

Jamie: Well … You remember I told you about that placement that I applied for?

Carolina: Placement? What's that?

Jamie: Like a training position – work experience.

Carolina: You applied for a lot of different things.

Jamie: Yeah. Yeah, that's right.

Carolina: And?

Jamie: Well, they've accepted me.

Carolina: Which one? Where?

Jamie: The one I really wanted. The best one.

Carolina: Oh no. Borneo.

Jamie: Yep. Borneo. The orang-utans.

Carolina: You've got the job.

Jamie: Well, I haven't got it yet. I have to wait for my exam results. They say I have to get a 2:1.

Carolina: You'll get a 2:1. You know you will.

Jamie: I hope so. I've got a 2:1 in my continuous assessment. And the exams are going well.

Carolina: So that's good then.

Jamie: It's great … but you know there's a problem.

Carolina: Yes.

Jamie: The band.

Carolina: The band!?

Jamie: The tour in October with The Electrons. I don't know what to do. It's a terrible decision. Stay here and go on tour with the band – that's every guy's dream. Or go to Borneo and work with orang-utans – my dream since I was a kid. I can't do both.

Carolina: And what about me? Do you think I want you to go to Borneo, the other side of the world?

Jamie: It's only for nine months. We can email, we can phone, we can text. Look, I need time to think about this. It's the biggest decision of my life. And I need you to understand that. Please. OK?

Carolina: Oh, Jamie. OK.

Jamie: Thanks. Now come on, let's get some lunch.

 

Jo and Adam

Adam: And here's Jo again in the studio. Hi Jo.

Jo: Hi everybody. It's getting exciting, isn't it? Jamie's got the job ...

Adam: But will he go to Borneo?

Jo: Or stay with the band and tour with The Electrons? I think I'd go on tour with the band.

Adam: I think I'd go to Borneo. I visited once and it was amazing. But we need to wait for his exam results.

Jo: Ah, yes. And that's what I want to talk about today. Listen to Jamie and Carolina.

Jamie: Well, I haven't got it yet. I have to wait for my exam results. They say I have to get a 2:1.

Carolina: You'll get a 2:1. You know you will.

Jamie: I hope so. I've got a 2:1 in my continuous assessment. And the exams are going well.

Jo: A 2:1 is a grade. When you get your final degree, you can get a first class degree, which is a very good degree. Like a grade A.

Adam: People say 'I'd like to get a first', or 'My brother got a first at Oxford'.

Jo: And then there's a second class degree. Second class degrees are divided into two levels – you can get a 2:1, which is a good degree, like a grade B.

Adam: Or a 2:2, which isn't as good as a 2:1 – more like a grade C.

Jo: And then there's a third class degree, which isn't so good – more like a grade D.

Adam: So, when you finish university and get your final degree, you can get a first, a 2:1, a 2:2 or a third.

Jo: And Jamie needs to get a 2:1 for the job in Borneo. Listen again to Jamie.

Jamie: I've got a 2:1 in my continuous assessment. And the exams are going well.

Jo: On Jamie's course, students are assessed by a combination of coursework – 'continuous assessment' – and exams, but every university has a different system.

Adam: I used to like exams because I didn’t have to work as hard through the year to pass the course. I could just study hard for a short time before the exam. What about you?

Jo: I preferred continuous assessment. I used to get very stressed for exams.

Adam: We'd like you to write and tell us what you think about exams and continuous assessment.

Jo: Which system do you prefer? Which do you think is better?

Adam: The address is www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish. And that's all for today. There are some exercises on the website to help you with the language from the podcast.

Jo: Including some more vocabulary connected with study and university.

Jo/Adam: Bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the sentences that are true according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

初阶播客 - 系列3

Tab: 
Elementary Podcasts
Chinese, Simplified

Adam惊叹于听众朋友对伦敦的了解程度。而在纽卡斯尔,Carolina在店里遇到了一位非常难缠的顾客,而这不过只是一个非常糟糕的一天的开始。通过我们的播客学习英语!

Adam惊叹于听众朋友对伦敦的了解程度。而在纽卡斯尔,Carolina在店里遇到了一位非常难缠的顾客,而这不过只是一个非常糟糕的一天的开始。通过我们的播客学习英语!

Elementary Podcasts - Series 3

Tab: 
Elementary Podcasts
Arabic

آدم منبهر بكل ما تعرفونه عن لندن. فى نيوكاسل تقابل كارولينا عميلاً بشعاً في متجر وتكون هذه مجرد بداية ليوم سيء جداً. تعلم الإنجليزية مع البودكاست!

آدم منبهر بكل ما تعرفونه عن لندن. فى نيوكاسل تقابل كارولينا عميلاً بشعاً في متجر وتكون هذه مجرد بداية ليوم سيء جداً. تعلم الإنجليزية مع البودكاست!

Series 03 Episode 16

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Adam is impressed by how much you know about London. In Newcastle, Carolina meets a horrible customer in the shop and that's just the start of a very bad day.

1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Language level: 
Task 2

Put the words in order to make sentences from the podcast.

Exercise

Task 3

Put the words in the right spaces to make sentences from the podcast. Don’t look back at Activity 2!

Exercise

Task 4

‘Cat’ is a one-syllable word. ‘Window’ has two syllables. ‘Exciting’ has three. How many syllables do these words have? Put them in the right group.

Exercise

Task 5

Words with two syllables. Do we say ‘window’ (●•), or window’ (•●)? Which syllable is stressed in these words? Put the words in the right group.

Exercise

Task 6

Words with three syllables. Which syllable is stressed? Put the words in the right group.

Exercise

Task 7

Which syllable is stressed? Choose the right one.

Exercise

Task 8

Saying you don’t understand. Put the words in the right places.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

If you don’t live at home or you lived away from home in the past, do you (or did you) ever feel homesick? If so, what do you do to make yourself feel better? Even if you’ve never felt homesick, what advice would you give to Carolina to make herself feel better?

Adam

Adam: Hello and welcome to Episode 16 of Series 4 of LearnEnglish Elementary Podcasts. My name is Adam and my colleague Jo will be joining us later to talk about some of the language from the podcast.

Last time we heard Tess and Ravi talking about Sherlock Holmes, a famous British detective. Or perhaps I should say a famous British fictional detective. As Ravi explained, Sherlock Holmes wasn't a real person – he was actually a character in stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Zafarbek from Uzbekistan wrote in to say thank you for the information! Zafarbek loves Sherlock Holmes films but didn't know that Sherlock Holmes wasn't a real detective. Don’t worry, Zafarbek, even when Doyle was writing the original stories 120 years ago, people thought he was real then.

Abdulazim Saffaf from Syria says 'I thought he was a real person until I listened to this podcast!' Abdulazim also said that he's just bought a hat like Sherlock's hat and so all his friends call him Sherlock Holmes. You don't see many hats like that these days, Abdulazim – and it's called a 'deerstalker' by the way, because people used to wear them when they were hunting deer.

Ypf1083 is new to the website – welcome! – and says 'I've read most of the books about Sherlock Holmes and I love them. He's one of my favorite characters'. Me, too. And britishlearner from Guinea remembers hearing about Sherlock Holmes for the first time in one of the jokes from the first series of the podcast (Series 1 Episode 2 actually, britishlearner – you've got a good memory!) and also in an episode of Word on the Street, when Ashley tried to solve a crime.

Zara Zieno from Syria isn't very keen on Sherlock Holmes. She once tried to watch it with her brother but had to stop because it was very frightening. But Zara really likes a series called Detective Conan, and a lot of you wrote in to say the same thing – Detective Conan is obviously very popular, even though I've never heard of him!

So thank you to Wuri Koes and Arum Adriani, both from Indonesia, for writing in and explaining a bit about it. As Wuri Koes explains, Detective Conan is a Japanese manga series. It's about a clever student who helps the police solve crimes. His enemies give him a poison that turns him into a child, but he carries on solving crimes secretly and calls himself Conan after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who wrote the Sherlock Holmes books. And, as Arum Adriana says, there are some similarities between Sherlock Holmes and Detective Conan and the way they solve their cases, perhaps because the writer, Gosho Aoyama, is a big Holmes fan.

Speaking of other fictional detectives, Laura 1240 from Italy said 'Ever since I was a child I've always loved Agatha Christie and her private Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, but I like Miss Marple very much too. I've read almost all her books, and watched all the movies and TV series based on her characters and I really, really love them all!'

Great comments everyone – please keep writing them. And don't forget about the Elementary Podcast app. Follow the link from the LearnEnglish website or go to the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store to get it.

And now it's time to catch up with Carolina and her friends. It's coming to the end of the academic year, everyone's busy with exams – and some people have some important decisions to make about their future. Let's see what's happening ...

 

Carolina – After the exam

Fellow student: Phew. That was difficult.

Carolina: Yes, it was. Did you do question four? The one about South America?

Fellow student: The one about the Atlantic coast? God no. That was really complicated. Why? Did you?

Carolina: Yes. I thought it was quite easy. Oh dear.

Fellow student: Coming for lunch?

Carolina: Yes, um, oh, um, just a minute, I've got a voice message.

Jamie: Hi. It's me. I need to speak to you. It's really important. I'm in an exam until one. Meet me outside the lecture block after that.

Carolina: Oh. Well, no, I can't come for lunch, Sally. Sorry. I've got to meet someone.

Fellow student: OK. See you tomorrow.

Carolina: Yeah, bye …

 

Carolina: So, Jamie? What is it?

Jamie: Wait a minute. Let's find somewhere to sit down.

Carolina: Can't you tell me now? Is it something terrible?

Jamie: Do you want to go somewhere for lunch?

Carolina: No. Let's sit down here. Now. On the grass.

Jamie: Phew. It's really hot. I told you British weather isn't always terrible.

Carolina: Jamie! I know you British talk about the weather all the time – but not now! Why did you want to see me? Tell me now.

Jamie: Well … You remember I told you about that placement that I applied for?

Carolina: Placement? What's that?

Jamie: Like a training position – work experience.

Carolina: You applied for a lot of different things.

Jamie: Yeah. Yeah, that's right.

Carolina: And?

Jamie: Well, they've accepted me.

Carolina: Which one? Where?

Jamie: The one I really wanted. The best one.

Carolina: Oh no. Borneo.

Jamie: Yep. Borneo. The orang-utans.

Carolina: You've got the job.

Jamie: Well, I haven't got it yet. I have to wait for my exam results. They say I have to get a 2:1.

Carolina: You'll get a 2:1. You know you will.

Jamie: I hope so. I've got a 2:1 in my continuous assessment. And the exams are going well.

Carolina: So that's good then.

Jamie: It's great … but you know there's a problem.

Carolina: Yes.

Jamie: The band.

Carolina: The band!?

Jamie: The tour in October with The Electrons. I don't know what to do. It's a terrible decision. Stay here and go on tour with the band – that's every guy's dream. Or go to Borneo and work with orang-utans – my dream since I was a kid. I can't do both.

Carolina: And what about me? Do you think I want you to go to Borneo, the other side of the world?

Jamie: It's only for nine months. We can email, we can phone, we can text. Look, I need time to think about this. It's the biggest decision of my life. And I need you to understand that. Please. OK?

Carolina: Oh, Jamie. OK.

Jamie: Thanks. Now come on, let's get some lunch.

 

Jo and Adam

Adam: And here's Jo again in the studio. Hi Jo.

Jo: Hi everybody. It's getting exciting, isn't it? Jamie's got the job ...

Adam: But will he go to Borneo?

Jo: Or stay with the band and tour with The Electrons? I think I'd go on tour with the band.

Adam: I think I'd go to Borneo. I visited once and it was amazing. But we need to wait for his exam results.

Jo: Ah, yes. And that's what I want to talk about today. Listen to Jamie and Carolina.

Jamie: Well, I haven't got it yet. I have to wait for my exam results. They say I have to get a 2:1.

Carolina: You'll get a 2:1. You know you will.

Jamie: I hope so. I've got a 2:1 in my continuous assessment. And the exams are going well.

Jo: A 2:1 is a grade. When you get your final degree, you can get a first class degree, which is a very good degree. Like a grade A.

Adam: People say 'I'd like to get a first', or 'My brother got a first at Oxford'.

Jo: And then there's a second class degree. Second class degrees are divided into two levels – you can get a 2:1, which is a good degree, like a grade B.

Adam: Or a 2:2, which isn't as good as a 2:1 – more like a grade C.

Jo: And then there's a third class degree, which isn't so good – more like a grade D.

Adam: So, when you finish university and get your final degree, you can get a first, a 2:1, a 2:2 or a third.

Jo: And Jamie needs to get a 2:1 for the job in Borneo. Listen again to Jamie.

Jamie: I've got a 2:1 in my continuous assessment. And the exams are going well.

Jo: On Jamie's course, students are assessed by a combination of coursework – 'continuous assessment' – and exams, but every university has a different system.

Adam: I used to like exams because I didn’t have to work as hard through the year to pass the course. I could just study hard for a short time before the exam. What about you?

Jo: I preferred continuous assessment. I used to get very stressed for exams.

Adam: We'd like you to write and tell us what you think about exams and continuous assessment.

Jo: Which system do you prefer? Which do you think is better?

Adam: The address is www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish. And that's all for today. There are some exercises on the website to help you with the language from the podcast.

Jo: Including some more vocabulary connected with study and university.

Jo/Adam: Bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the answers that are true according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

Pages

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