Series 03 Episode 18

Adam reads your comments about families and we find out if Carolina is feeling any better.

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the sentences that are true according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

Did Carolina or Emily say these sentences from the podcast?

Exercise

English

Move the words into the gaps to complete the sentences from the podcast.

Exercise

Match the signs to the places where you would see the signs.

Exercise

Put the words in the right order to make rules for an English language classroom.

Exercise

Put the words in the right spaces to make some British superstitions.

Exercise

Match the two halves of the sentences to make a present perfect continuous sentence.

Exercise

Put the words in the right spaces.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

  • Where do you go and what do you do to cheer yourself up when you feel sad?
  • Can you visit the countryside and nature easily where you live?
  • What contact do you have with nature in your day-to-day life?
Series: 

Shopping is Great - Part 1

London has some of the world’s most famous department stores: Harrods, Selfridges, Fortnum & Mason, Harvey Nichols and many others. Our presenter Richard visits them and also samples a smaller shop for a range of shopping experiences.

English
Downloads
1 Article: 

In what order did Richard look at the following products?

Exercise

What's special about each shop or area?

Exercise

Match the beginnings and ends of these phrases.

Exercise

Richard said "If only they had it in my size". Type the correct form of the verb in the gap. Make it negative if necessary. 

We have a page on LearnEnglish about the use of 'if only'.

Exercise

London is the shopping capital of the world. Every year millions of overseas visitors shop here. But what makes shopping here so great? There’s only one way to find out. I’m off to do some shopping – follow me!

At Harrods

Knightsbridge is famous for upmarket shopping. This is where the rich and famous come to buy… their socks. And this is the one and only Harrods… the ultimate in luxury. Even royalty shop here. If I’m lucky, I might see someone famous.

If only they had it in my size. Lovely! Thank you!

Done quite well there – what’s next? Taxi! Harvey Nichols, please.

At Harvey Nichols

Harvey Nichols – or ‘Harvey Nicks’ for short – is a great place for designer fashion.

Well, I had to buy couple of things… What?

At Hamleys

The biggest toy shop in the world – now you’re talking!

So cute… err… it’s not for me.

Oxford Street

London’s Oxford Street is retail heaven. It’s got over 2 kilometres of shops to choose from… and, of course, Selfridges for shopping with style. Taxi!

Could you drop all this off home for me, please? I’m off to explore a different sort of shopping in Britain.

If you like shopping all under one roof, then there are big shopping centres all over Britain. The Olympic-sized shopping centre at Westfield, Stratford, is huge. With over 300 shops, it’s one of the largest shopping centres in Europe. 

At Lock's

Great shopping isn’t just about big shops. Smaller shops can offer something special too. Tucked away in the heart of Piccadilly is a great shopping gem. Lock’s sell that must-have in gentlemen’s fashion: the hat! Lock’s opened in London in 1679. Their hats can be seen across the world. They pride themselves on their personal service.

Richard: Sue Simpson is a hat specialist. Hi Sue.

Sue: Oh, hi Richard.

Richard: Wow, a bowler hat, you don’t see many of those these days, do you?

Sue: Well, we don’t call it a ‘bowler’ here at Lock’s, we call it a ‘coke hat’ because it was invented in 1850 for Thomas Coke…

Richard: …by this very shop.

Sue: …by this very shop and we still call it a ‘coke’ to this day.

Richard: Ah, the classic top hat. When would I wear that?

Sue: That’s a beautiful silk top hat. You would wear that for a society wedding, or the time you see most of them is at Ascot, which is the famous race meeting in June.

Richard: So what’s your best-seller here at Lock’s?

Sue: Our best-seller would be a classic tweed cap or this trilby here, which is called a ‘Voyager’, and the novelty of this one…

Richard: …is it folds up so you can pop it into your luggage.

Sue: …pop it into your luggage.

Richard: Excellent. Is that a deerstalker?

Sue: Similar to a deerstalker, but this is a country cap with a fastening that goes over the top. And this was invented originally for wearing in open-top cars, but now it’s more commonly worn on the hills out shooting and this keeps the ears warm and stops it blowing away.

Richard: I like it; I’ll take this one.

Powerlifting

Tab: 
Read Worksheet
English

Powerlifting is the Paralympic equivalent of the Olympic sport of weightlifting. There is only one type of lift – the bench press. Athletes lie on their back before lifting the weight. It is one of the Paralympic sports in which athletes with different disabilities compete together. Have you ever tried to do a bench press? How much could you lift? An athlete at the 2008 Paralympics lifted 265 kg!

1 Article: 
Task 2
Task 3
Spotting

If you looked up ‘spotting’ in the dictionary, you would usually see explanations connected with ‘seeing’ and ‘raining’. However, ‘spotting’ in weightlifting is different and it means supporting another person during a weightlifting exercise. It is particularly common, and recommended, when doing the bench press, which is the type of weightlifting done in Powerlifting. This is because of the risks of lifting a heavy weight while lying on your back.

Spotting takes place during both training and competition. In training, the emphasis is on helping the athlete lift more than he could normally do. Correct spotting involves knowing when to help with a lift, and encouraging your training partner.

In competition, the role of the spotter is very important. The athlete may request the help of the spotters when removing the bar from the racks. Of course there is the obvious role of catching the bar in the event of an accident to prevent injury.

But the spotter cannot help the athlete in any way to lift the weight. From the moment the referee gives the signal ‘start’, to the moment he gives the signal ‘rack’, the competitor will be disqualified if the spotter touches the bar.

In both training and competition, good spotting involves knowing exactly when you should or should not intervene.

To understand this sport better, first look at the illustration and read about the rules and classification system. Then do the vocabulary exercise. The second reading is all about the importance of 'spotting'!

Teachers: the lesson plan is coming soon. Meanwhile why not check out the other sports lesson plans available from the English for the Games section of the Teaching English website?

Shopping is Great - Part 2

Richard leaves the big shopping areas for small, interesting shops and markets. We hear from a man who sells photographs to Outer Mongolia, and some London shoppers tell us what they like.

English
Downloads
1 Article: 

What is the main message of this video?

Exercise

Which of the following things happen in this video?

Exercise

Put the words in order to make sentences from the video.

Exercise

Match the halves of the sentences.

Exercise

Small specialist shops can be found all over the country. The Lanes in Brighton are made up of a fabulous web of small streets with lots of quirky shops and boutiques. They’re a great place to discover original fashion, furniture and accessories…

But a shopping spree doesn’t have to involve visiting shops! British markets are really popular and sometimes in surprising places. This is Piccadilly Market at St James’ Church in central London, and not many people know it’s here.

Photographer Simon Weinstock runs a stall here.

Richard: Hi Simon. Tell me about your stall.

Simon: Well, I’ve been here 15 years on St James’ Market. This is my most popular image, I do lots of other images. This is a London bus going round Piccadilly circus with the old Underground sign, very iconic. I do the London Eye, I do the Houses of Parliament, terribly popular of course.

Richard: So who are your customers?

Simon: My customers come here from all over the world. I have Russians, lots of Americans, Chinese these days, Australians – you name it, they come here! Some of my work’s gone to Outer Mongolia, believe it or not.

Richard: And in your opinion, what makes Piccadilly Market so special?

Simon: It’s a very unique, small market. There’s only about 40 stalls here. It’s a very friendly market. Not that many people know about it – it’s a hidden gem! And there are lots of stalls that you can only buy the product here, they’re not available anywhere else in London, so that makes it very unusual.

Richard: What do you like about shopping in London?

Girl: I think, like, the variety of stuff and there’s always something different, there’s always something on the street, there’s always something new to buy.

Man: I like about shopping in London the old shop, like in Covent Gardens, the old shop.

Woman 1: I like the mixture of some expensive and some cheaper ones. I like.

Woman 2: Well, I think it’s just the variety of shops and places where you can go for shops.

Richard: Britain is great for shopping. There’s such variety, and there’s something for everyone. The only trouble is – there’s too much choice!

Series 03 Episode 17

Tess and Ravi talk about a very famous British family and Adam passes on your kind words to Carolina.

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the sentences that are true according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

Match the names to the descriptions, according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

English

Write the numbers of the kings and queens (in words) into the spaces.

Exercise

Drag the words into the right spaces.

Exercise

Read these sentences about Emily and Roy's family and put the words in the spaces.

Exercise

A logic problem. Read the information and the clues and type the names in the spaces.

Exercise

Drag the words into the right spaces.

Exercise

Write the missing words in the spaces. Use 'older', 'oldest', 'younger' or 'youngest'.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

Do you live in a country which has a king or queen? Did you have to learn the names of kings and queens in history at school? Are the names for family members more specific in your language than in English? And do tell us about your family!

Series: 

初阶播客 - 系列3

Tab: 
Elementary Podcasts
Chinese, Simplified

Adam惊叹于听众朋友对伦敦的了解程度。而在纽卡斯尔,Carolina在店里遇到了一位非常难缠的顾客,而这不过只是一个非常糟糕的一天的开始。通过我们的播客学习英语!

Adam惊叹于听众朋友对伦敦的了解程度。而在纽卡斯尔,Carolina在店里遇到了一位非常难缠的顾客,而这不过只是一个非常糟糕的一天的开始。通过我们的播客学习英语!

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