Series 03 Episode 10

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Carolina has a new job, but does she enjoy it? Rob and Adam talk about all the different things that you drink.

1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Language level: 
Topics: 
Task 2

Match the times in number format with the times in word format.

Exercise

Task 3

Move the words into the right gaps.

Exercise

Task 4

Put the different parts of the conversation in the right order. The first is at the top.

Exercise

Task 5

Drag the words into the right gaps.

Exercise

Task 6

Choose two possible answers.

Exercise

Task 7

Match the questions to the answers.

Exercise

Task 8

Type one word in the gaps to complete the small talk.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

Do you like your job – or your studies or your school?

We’d like to hear what you like or what you don’t like about your job. Is it interesting and exciting or is it boring and badly paid?

Adam and Rob

Both: Hello!

Rob: I’m Rob.

Adam: And I’m Adam.

Rob: Welcome to Episode 10 of the podcast. In a moment we’re going to hear from Carolina again. There’s a new friend for her and Emily today.

Adam: But first, as usual, we’re going to take a look at some of your messages and comments. Tess and Ravi talked about tea and the British habit of drinking tea – a lot of tea – a hundred and sixty-five million cups of tea every day!

Rob: We asked what the most popular drink was in your country. And for lots of you it’s tea too. All over the world – Indonesia, Libya, China, Iran, Azerbaijan – you’re all drinking lots of tea.

Adam: And so many different kinds of tea. We heard about black tea and red tea in Tunisia, green tea in Japan, mint tea in Egypt, lotus tea and iced tea in Vietnam – and how about this from Shuvanjan in Nepal. He says:

Most people in Nepal are used to drinking milk tea, which is made by mixing milk, sugar, fermented tea leaf granules and spices. The spices mostly include ginger, black pepper and cardamom. However, people living in the Himalaya region mostly take salty tea - tea made with milk and butter.

Rob: Tea with milk and butter? I’m not sure that I like the sound of that.

Adam: Well, I've tried tea in a Nepali restaurant and it was milky and sweet, not salty.

Rob: So, the English aren’t the only tea drinkers – you drink it everywhere. But you’re also drinking lots of coffee. In Italy, of course, but also in Latin America: Mexico, Brazil and this is Franklin from Colombia:

I am Franklin and I am from Colombia, the country of coffee. A lot of people around the world know that the best coffee is produced in Colombia, and it is recognized for its flavor and fragrance. Many cities around the world have shops selling coffee from Colombia.

Adam: The best coffee in the world? Maybe some of our Brazilian listeners disagree!

Rob: We also heard about mate in Argentina – thanks Wences – lassi in India and Karla Lara, the singer in our podcast band, told us about champurrado and ponche in Mexico. Woul from South Sudan told us that milk is the most popular drink there.

Adam: Thanks everyone for all your comments – we love reading them and we hope you read each other’s comments too. Remember that you can send comments to us at www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish – look for Elementary Podcasts.

Rob: Also, keep an eye on our Facebook page. Tess and Ravi are answering your questions there and also arranging times that they will be online to answer questions you have for them.

Adam: Right, time to catch up with Carolina. You remember that Carolina is a student from Venezuela who is studying in Newcastle in the north-east of England. Last time we heard from her, she’d got a job in a shop at the university and Jamie, her boyfriend, had started a band. Let’s hear how she’s enjoying the job.

 

Carolina

Emily: Hello!

Carolina: Hello, Emily.

Emily: Well, this is strange! Look at you in your uniform.

Carolina: I know. It's horrible, isn't it?

Emily: So how are you getting on? Are you enjoying it?

Carolina: It's OK.

Emily: Just OK?

Carolina: Well, you know, it can get really, really busy, and if I'm here on my own… Yesterday was awful.

Emily: Are you here alone all the time?

Carolina: No. There's a woman called Alice – she's here sometimes. But she isn't very friendly. She doesn't like me for some reason. And Mr Spencer, the boss, comes in sometimes, but I don't like it when he's here – it makes me nervous.

Emily: So you prefer it when you're here alone?

Carolina: Well, I told you, I get nervous. I don't like it when it gets busy.

Emily: It isn't busy now. I'm almost the only customer in the shop.

Carolina: Then it's really boring. There's no one to talk to and nothing to do. And Mr Spencer says I'm not allowed to read.

Emily: Gosh, Carolina. You are difficult to please. You don't like being with Alice or Mr Spencer, you don't like being alone, you don't like it when it's busy and you don't like it when it's quiet. What do you want? Do you really hate this job?

Carolina: No, no, I don't hate it. I'm just not enjoying it very much.

Emily: Cheer up. It'll get better. You just need a bit more experience.

Carolina: Yes, I know.

Emily: Why don't we go to the cinema tomorrow? You don't work on Sunday, do you?

Carolina: Actually I'm going to the cinema with Jamie tomorrow, after his band practice.

Emily: Oh yeah – the band. Have they got a name yet?

Carolina: No, not yet. Let's all go to the cinema together – you come too. Jamie would like to see you.

Emily: OK, I'd like to. If you're sure you don't mind. What are you going to see?

Carolina: I don't know. Jamie said it's a great film. It's on at the shopping centre, so we'll meet there.

Emily: What time?

Carolina: About seven? Outside the cinema, next to the ticket office.

Emily: OK. I have to go. I'll probably be in bed when you get home.

Carolina: What time is it now?

Emily: Quarter past seven.

Carolina: Only five more hours to go.

Carolina: So then he asked me to give him some... Oh hello, Jamie.

Jamie: Hi. Hi, Emily.

Emily: Hi.

Jamie: Uh, this is Cameron. Cameron, this is Carolina and this is Emily.

Cameron: Hello.

Emily and Carolina: Hi, nice to meet you.

Jamie: Cameron's in the band. He's the lead singer.

Emily: Cool.

Cameron: Well, I do my best.

Carolina: And are you at the university, Cameron?

Cameron: No, I'm not. I work in First Page, the bookshop.

Emily: Wow, what a great job!

Cameron: Yeah, it's OK.

Jamie: Not for much longer, Cameron. We're gonna be rich and famous, remember?

Cameron: Yeah!

Carolina: Come on, let's go and get the tickets.

 

Adam and Rob

Rob: That’s an interesting laugh. Carolina doesn’t seem to be enjoying her job very much. I used to work in a shop when I was a student and it can be pretty boring. I’m lucky these days that I enjoy my job so much. I like meeting my students, I like teaching, I love languages…

Adam: I really like reading and answering people's comments on the LearnEnglish website.

Rob: What about you, listeners? Do you like your job or your studies or your school? You all told us about your first jobs, but now we’d like to hear what you like or what you don’t like about your job.

Adam: Is it interesting and exciting or is it boring and badly paid? Write and let us know. And don’t worry – we won’t tell your boss what you said!

Rob: Now, did you hear the conversation when Carolina and Emily met Cameron? Listen again:

Carolina: So then he asked me to give him some... Oh hello, Jamie.

Jamie: Hi. Hi, Emily.

Emily: Hi.

Jamie: Uh, this is Cameron. Cameron, this is Carolina and this is Emily.

Cameron: Hello.

Emily and Carolina: Hi, nice to meet you.

Jamie: Cameron's in the band. He's the lead singer.

Emily: Cool.

Cameron: Well, I do my best.

Carolina: And are you at the university, Cameron?

Cameron: No, I'm not. I work in First Page, the bookshop.

Emily: Wow, what a great job!

Cameron: Yeah, it's OK.

Adam: Lots to listen out for there. What do we say when we introduce people to each other?

Jamie: Uh, this is Cameron. Cameron, this is Carolina and this is Emily.

Cameron: Hello.

Rob: We say ‘This is...’ ‘This is Adam...’ – and what do we say when we meet people for the first time?

Jamie: Uh, this is Cameron. Cameron, this is Carolina and this is Emily.

Cameron: Hello.

Emily and Carolina: Hi, nice to meet you.

Adam: ‘Nice to meet you’ – we often say ‘nice to meet you’ when we meet someone for the first time.

Rob: And did you notice what Carolina and Emily did next? They asked questions.

Carolina: And are you at the university, Cameron?

Cameron: No, I'm not. I work in First Page, the bookshop.

Emily: Wow, what a great job!

Cameron: Yeah, it's OK.

Adam: These are questions to ‘break the ice’ – to start finding out more about the person you’ve just met. We’ve put some exercises to help you find out more about breaking the ice on our website. You’ll find them at www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish

Rob: Well, I think that’s all we’ve got time for this time. We’ll be back soon with Tess and Ravi again. They’ll be talking about something British that you might think is really quite horrible… what could it be?

Adam: And thanks again for all your comments – we love hearing from you.

Rob and Adam: Bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Select all the true sentences.

Exercise

Series 03 Episode 09

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Our listeners' musical talents are the topic for discussion this episode. Tess and Ravi tell you all about the drink British people are famous for loving.

1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Language level: 
Task 2

Put the sentences in the right group.

Exercise

 

Task 3

Put the verbs in the spaces.

Exercise

 

Task 4

Choose the right form of the verb.

Exercise

 

Task 5

Match the two parts of the dialogue.

Exercise

Task 6

Type the missing word.

Exercise

Task 7

Match the words with the definitions.

Exercise

Task 8

Put the sentences in order to make a British cup of tea!

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

Do you drink tea or coffee? How do you make it? With or without milk? With or without sugar? What other things do people in your country like to drink?

We always enjoy reading your comments and we read some of them out in the following episode.

Adam and Rob

Both: Hello!

Adam: I’m Adam.

Rob: And I’m Rob.

Adam: And welcome to Episode 9 of our podcast. We’re going to hear from Tess and Ravi in a little while. They’ll be talking about a very British drink – any idea what it is?

Rob: But first let’s have a look at some of your comments on the last podcast – where we discovered some great new bands: Milky Way, As Borbulhantes (that’s 'The Bubble Girls' in English), Hope, Dead Flowers and The Mixture. They’re all bands that our listeners have been part of – so remember those names!

Adam: That’s right, we asked you for your musical memories and we’ve got lots of talented musicians listening to the podcast. We’ve got guitarists like Mandana in Iran and Azeriboy in Azerbaijan. We've got a trumpeter, Joao Oliveira in Portugal. Esdras and Nat Viegas in Brazil are both drummers and so is Flautas in Mexico. Nana Adel in Egypt plays the accordion and Guisouzarego in Brazil plays the saxophone. I think we should put together an Elementary podcast band.

Rob: We need a singer though. How about Karlalara7 in Mexico? Karla says: A musician told me that it is easier to play a guitar than to be a good singer, because in order to have a good voice you have to be born like that, and when you use your voice it's like another string that has to be in tune. Now I have the objective to find a place where I can sing, because I always liked it, but I didn´t notice what a special talent it is.

Adam: How about it, Karla? Do you want to sing with the Elementary podcast band? There were lots of other great comments too – too many to read out here. Kieu Trang even mentioned a special song about his city, Hanoi, in Vietnam. Check out ‘the Hanoi Boogie’ on YouTube. Is there a special song about your city? Let us know at the usual address. www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish or look for Elementary podcasts on Facebook.

Rob: Now, we don’t have time to mention them all, but we do keep reading your messages. Navaho in China told us about people there who make their living by queuing and we think we found a place where people queue as politely as they do in Britain – that's Kenya. Thanks for that story, Kamore.

Adam: Now, last time we said that Tess and Ravi were going to talk about something British people like to drink and we asked what that drink might be. Kieu Trang had the answer. Listen and find out what it was.

 

Tess and Ravi

Ravi: Hi there, everyone. I’m Ravi.

Tess: And I’m Tess, and as usual we’re going to talk about something you think you know about Britain.

Ravi: We asked our listeners what they think is ‘typically British’ and they said things like fish and chips, London buses, the Royal Family and lots of people mentioned a particular drink. What do you think it is?

Tess: Tea. Lots of people said that they thought British people drink a lot of tea – and it’s true. A hundred and sixty five million cups of tea are drunk every day in Britain.

Ravi: A hundred and sixty-five million? Blimey.

Tess: I know. That’s more than sixty billion cups a year.

Ravi: Unbelievable. Why do we drink so much tea?

Tess: Well, actually, I don’t drink tea at all, but British people have been...

Ravi: Hang on. You don’t drink tea? What about coffee?

Tess: I sometimes have a fruit tea but, no, I don’t drink tea or coffee.

Ravi: Don’t you? I have a coffee in the morning and then about six cups of tea during the day. Is tea more popular than coffee?

Tess: Oh, yeah. We said a hundred and sixty-five million cups of tea every day. Well, the number of cups of coffee is seventy million, so we drink more than twice as much tea as coffee.

Ravi: Do we? How come the British drink so much tea? Is it because we used to have an empire or something like that? And how do you know all of this stuff, Tess? Are you just inventing these numbers?

Tess: It’s called ‘research’, Ravi. I looked it up on the internet. The British have been drinking lots of tea since the seventeenth century – it was mostly just rich people drinking tea at first but by the nineteenth century everybody was drinking it and that was when all the... rituals of drinking tea started.

Ravi: What do you mean by rituals?

Tess: Well, things like making tea in a pot and the way we make tea and serve it – and things like afternoon tea when we have a cup of tea and cakes and sandwiches.

Ravi: About once a year.

Tess: Well, yes, we don’t do it every day, but you know what I mean. You know that in other countries people don’t put milk in tea, but in Britain ninety-eight per cent of tea is taken with milk.

Ravi: Oh, you can’t have a cup of tea without milk, Tess. Not too much milk – you don’t want it too milky - and put the tea in first, then the milk, then the sugar.

Tess: See – that’s the kind of ritual I’m talking about. People have strong ideas about the best way to make a cup of tea. Do you make your tea in a teapot?

Ravi: Of course! You have to make tea in a teapot. It tastes horrible if you make it in a cup. If you want a good cup of tea, you have to make it yourself.

Tess: Do you think so?

Ravi: Definitely. In fact, all this talking about tea is making me thirsty. Do you want a cuppa? Oh, you don’t drink tea. I forgot.

Tess: I wonder if other languages have words like that. ‘Do you want a cuppa?’ or ‘do you want a brew’? You know, the way we say ‘a cuppa’ and everyone knows you mean ‘a cup of tea’.

Ravi: Didn’t it tell you that on your internet site? Right, I’m going to make a brew. You can’t beat a nice cup of tea.

 

Adam and Rob

Rob: I’m with Ravi – you can’t beat a nice cup of tea. But it has to be right, not too much milk.

Adam: That's funny, because I'm the same as Tess. I don't like tea.

Rob: What about you, listeners? Do you drink tea? How do you usually make it? With milk or without milk? Or is coffee the most popular drink in your country? I used to live in the south of Italy and the coffee there was fantastic – the best I’ve ever had. And actually, a friend of mine used to live in Argentina where they often drink another hot drink – mate. I’d love to hear more about that if anyone can tell me. So why not write and tell us what you – or people in your country – like to drink? Write your comments at www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish

Rob: Now, I want you to listen again to something Tess said:

Tess: Tea. Lots of people said that they thought British people drink a lot of tea – and it’s true. A hundred and sixty-five million cups of tea are drunk every day in Britain.

Rob: I want to look at the verb forms – ‘British people drink a lot of tea’ but ‘165 million cups of tea are drunk every day’. Listen again.

Tess: Tea. Lots of people said that they thought British people drink a lot of tea – and it’s true. A hundred and sixty-five million cups of tea are drunk every day in Britain.

Adam: Why is it ‘British people drink tea’, but ‘Lots of cups of tea are drunk every day’? The second one is passive. Who drinks all those cups of tea? British people, I suppose, but the sentence is about cups of tea, not British people, so the verb is passive – ‘be’ with the past participle, 'are drunk'. Listen to another example.

Tess: You know that in other countries people don’t put milk in tea, but in Britain ninety-eight per cent of tea is taken with milk.

Rob: ‘People don’t put milk in tea’ – active, but ‘98% of tea is taken with milk' passive, is taken.

Adam: There are lots of activities on our website to tell you more about the passive and how we form it and use it. Give them a go.

Rob: And there are also exercises about short questions like this:

Tess: I sometimes have a fruit tea but no, I don’t drink tea or coffee.

Ravi: Don’t you?

Tess: So we drink more than twice as much tea as coffee.

Ravi: Do we?

Adam: Tess said ‘I don’t drink tea or coffee’ and Ravi asked ‘Don’t you?’ Then she said ‘We drink twice as much tea as coffee’ and Ravi asked ‘Do we?’ Can you work out the rules for short questions like this? The activities on our website will help you. You’ll find them at www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish Look for Elementary Podcasts.

Rob: Well, that’s all we’ve got time for. We'll be back next time when we’ll hear more about Carolina and her job at the convenience store. So until then, bye!

Adam: Bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the sentences that are true.

Exercise

 

Series 03 Episode 08

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Jamie has a surprise for Carolina, who is already quite excited about her new job. Meanwhile, Rob and Adam have been waiting patiently since the last episode to talk about queuing.

1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Language level: 
Task 2

Put the days of the week in the right order. The first day should be 'Monday'.

Exercise

Task 3

Put the letters in order to spell the days of the week.

Exercise

Type in the days of the week.

Exercise

Task 4

Match the questions and the answers.

Exercise

Task 5

Drag the words into the right gaps.

Exercise

Task 6

Move the words into the right gaps.

Exercise

Now try to remember the words from the exercise above.

Exercise

Task 7

Match the possessives.

Exercise

Task 8

Choose the best option.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

Have you ever been in a band? What was the name of your band? What musical instrument do you play? What style of music do you play? Are you still playing? And, if not, why did you stop?

We love reading your comments and we reply to some of them each episode.

Adam and Rob

Both: Hello!

Adam: Welcome back. I’m Adam.

Rob: And I’m Rob.

Adam: And welcome to Episode 8 of our podcast.

Rob: This week we’ll hear from Carolina again – and Jamie’s got some exciting news.

Adam: But first we’ll take a look at your comments from the last podcast. In it, Tess and Ravi talked about queuing. Lots of people around the world think that queuing is a very ‘British’ thing to do. And do you know what – it might be true!

Rob: We asked you to tell us about queuing in your country and so many of your answers said that queues in your country aren’t like queues in Britain – and you don’t feel very happy about it! We heard about problems with queues and queue jumpers in Italy, China, Poland, Turkey, France, Indonesia… the list goes on. But none of you said that you ever jumped the queue – none of you except one person: Kirankumar in India, who admits that he used to jump the queue when he was young. Very honest of you, Kirankumar.

Adam: Very honest! Sylfide says that queuing in Spain is almost a national sport, like football, but she says she doesn’t mind queuing so much when she thinks of all the people who are queuing to try to find jobs. Some other people made serious points. MahmoudSaied talked about long queues for bread in his country, Egypt, and Uguisu tells about the very organised queues in Japan, especially after the terrible earthquake and tsunami there this year.

Rob: Finally though, let’s look at Italy. Our old podcast friend, Sergio, talked about new, creative ways of queue jumping and Angelo Scalisi talked about Italian people acting differently when they are in Britain. He says, “I know people that queue up quietly when they are in London, because in London they have to queue for everything and it’s very polite so they are very polite. But they try to jump the queue when they are in Italy! This is extremely impolite!

Adam: Thanks to all of you for your comments – they were really great. And sorry that we don’t have time to read them all out. Oh, I forgot Lahezis’s comment about queues in Poland during her childhood. She says they were a great place to meet friends and neighbours. See, I could read the comments out all day but we have to move on. Remember you can read what other people said and post your own comments by going to www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish or on our Facebook page. Look for ‘Elementary Podcasts’.

Rob: Now, though, let’s hear from Carolina. You remember that she had money problems and got a job in a convenience store. Today she breaks the news to Jamie – and he has some news of his own.

 

Carolina

Carolina: Hi. Phew!

Jamie: What's up?

Carolina: Nothing's 'up'. I'm excited. I've got the job. The one in the convenience store. I start on Thursday. Oh Jamie, I'm so happy.

Jamie: Well done! That's great news.

Carolina: He said he wants someone who can work hard and be efficient and I said I can, and he said OK, and then he said "The job's yours – see you on Thursday".

Waitress: Yes?

Carolina: Oh, a coffee, please. Black.

Jamie: Same for me, please.

Waitress: Two coffees. Anything else?

Carolina and Jamie: No, thanks.

Carolina: I can't wait to tell Emily. I start on Thursday.

Jamie: Yeah, you said that. What time on Thursday?

Carolina: I start at half past six.

Jamie: Half past six? Until?

Carolina: Until ten o'clock.

Jamie: Until ten o'clock?

Carolina: Yes. Why? What's the matter?

Jamie: The conservation society? We meet in the pub? Every Thursday at eight?

Carolina: Oh Jamie, I'm sorry. I wasn't thinking about the meetings.

Jamie: Obviously.

Carolina: This job is very important, Jamie. You can still go to the conservation meetings. You've got friends there – Ivan and Henry and the others. And I'm sure Layla will be happy to keep you company.

Jamie: Don't start with the Layla thing. Layla's a friend, that's all. As you know.

Waitress: Two coffees.

Carolina and Jamie: Thanks.

Jamie: So what about the other days? What are your working hours?

Carolina: Thursday evening, Friday evening and Saturday from four till midnight.

Jamie: Until midnight on Saturday? That's terrible. I'm never going to see you.

Carolina: We've got the other evenings. And all day Sunday.

Jamie: Hmm. Well, I've got some news too. We're starting a band.

Carolina: A band? A music band?

Jamie: Yes.

Carolina: A music band? Like playing guitars and singing?

Jamie: Yes, that's the idea. What's so funny?

Carolina: Nothing. I'm sorry. I just didn't know that you… I mean, you've never said that you could sing or anything.

Jamie: Well, I can. And I can play the guitar. Well, I'm not brilliant. But it's something I really want to do. And so do the others.

Carolina: Who are the others? Not Henry and Ivan!

Jamie: No. You don't know them. There's a guy from my course, and a guy who works in the bookshop near my place and his brother. It's gonna be really cool.

Carolina: Wow! That's great.

Jamie: Yeah. But the bad news is, our practice day is Sunday. The bookshop's closed and we can use the back room. So Sunday is the only day that you're free – and I'm busy.

Carolina: Well… we can... perhaps I can come and watch you practise sometimes. I'm happy about the band. What are you going to call it?

Jamie: Haven't decided yet. Any suggestions welcome. You never know, we might be rich and famous one day.

 

Adam and Rob

Adam: So, Jamie’s started a band. Have you ever been in a band, Rob?

Rob: I have. I was in a band when I was young, when I was at school.

Adam: What instrument did you play?

Rob: I played the drums. It was great, playing the drums. But unfortunately, the first time we played in front of people, I was so nervous my hands were shaking and I couldn’t play normally. It was awful!

Adam: Oh no! What about you, listeners, I’m sure you have some musical talents to share with us? Have you ever been in a band? What was the name of your band? What musical instrument do you play? What style of music do you play? Are you still playing? And, if not, why did you stop?

Rob: Write and tell us what you think. Here’s our address again. www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish and, of course, you can look for us on Facebook too.

Adam: Now, the exercises on our website for this podcast are about days of the week and about possessives. Listen to something Carolina said:

Carolina: He said he wants someone who can work hard and be efficient and I said I can, and he said OK, and then he said "The job's yours – see you on Thursday".

Rob: He said, ‘The job’s yours’. Not ‘the job’s your’, but ‘the job’s yours’. Do you know the difference between ‘my’ and ‘mine’ and ‘her’ and ‘hers’? They’re all possessives but some are adjectives and some are pronouns.

Adam: Possessive adjectives – ‘my’, ‘your’, ‘his’, ‘her’, ‘our’, and so on – describe a noun, like other adjectives. So we say ‘this is my umbrella’.

Rob: Possessive pronouns – ‘mine’, ‘yours’, ‘his’, ‘hers’, ‘ours’, and so on – take the place of a noun, like other pronouns. So we say ‘This umbrella is mine’.

Adam: There are lots of exercises about this on the website, so why not give them a go?

Rob: Next time we’ll hear from Tess and Ravi again, talking about something that British people like to drink – now what could that be?

Adam: See you next time.

Adam and Rob: Bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the sentences that are true.

Exercise

初级英语播客 - 系列 3

Tab: 
Elementary Podcasts
Chinese, Simplified

初级英语播客系列3的第6片段登场了。Carolina需要在英国找个工作,但是她可以如愿以偿吗?感谢大家有关足球运动的留言,您的观点让Adam很惊讶!

初级英语播客系列3的第6片段登场了。Carolina需要在英国找个工作,但是她可以如愿以偿吗?感谢大家有关足球运动的留言,您的观点让Adam很惊讶!

英语 2012

Tab: 
English for 2012
Chinese, Simplified

查阅英语2012板块,这里你会找到有关于伦敦2012奥林匹克与残疾人奥林匹克运动会的所有学习资源。

查阅英语2012板块,这里你会找到有关于伦敦2012奥林匹克与残疾人奥林匹克运动会的所有学习资源。

Series 03 Episode 06

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.
03:00|Carolina

Carolina wants a job to solve her money problems, but will she find one? Adam is surprised about your opinions of football!

1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Language level: 
Task 2

Move the expressions of time to the correct box at the bottom of the screen.

Exercise

Task 3

Which expressions of time are used with which prepositions?

Exercise

Task 4

Type the missing prepositions in the gaps. Be careful - sometimes the correct answer is no preposition!

Exercise

Task 5

Choose the correct ends to the sentences.

Exercise

Task 6

Drag the answers to the questions they go with.

Exercise

Task 7

Rearrange the words in the correct order.

Exercise

Task 8

Add the correct words at the start of each question.

Exercise

Tell us about your favourite time of day. 

Are you happiest in the morning or at night? Or maybe in the afternoon?

Adam

Adam: Hi everyone – I’m Adam. It's good to be back with you. My holiday was in Europe. I saw my family in Scotland, but I also visited Belgium and Germany for a couple of days. Rob is away this week, but he's not on holiday. He's travelling for work. In the last podcast Tess & Ravi talked about football hooligans and we asked you to tell us what you think about football. Well, I’m a bit surprised by your answers; so many of you don’t like football! Lyudmila in Russia, booky in Egypt, Angelo in Italy, Ana in Spain, Lamai in Thailand and Sankio in Poland. Guisouzarego in Brazil talked about football and money. He says it’s the ‘politics of bread and circuses’. One of you even said football is for donkeys! I’d better not say his name...

Not all of you hate football though. We had fans of Flamengo in Brazil, Galatasaray in Turkey, Santiago Wanderers in Chile and Wangmanhang in Taiwan is a big fan of Arsenal in England.

Thanks for all your comments about football. There are so many that we can’t mention them all but we love reading them. And we’re happy too that you’re still adding comments to the other questions we asked you. Sunghun, who’s from Korea but lives in Australia, told us a very nice ‘first job’ story and advised us, ‘I hope that everyone calls their parents today and says 'I love you'.’

It’s really great to hear all your comments and remember, you can join in and add your own comments by going to www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish. Or finding us on Facebook – look for 'Elementary Podcasts'.

Now, we’re back with Carolina this week. You remember that Carolina was worried about money and decided to get a job? Let’s see what happens next.

Carolina

Emily: Hi Jamie. I was just going out.

Jamie: Hi Emily. Is Carolina in?

Emily: Yeah, go on in. She's in the kitchen. But she's on the phone. She's found a job.

Jamie: Already?

Emily: Yeah. That convenience store at the university, you know, the one that's open all day Sunday. They want part­time staff. Well, she hasn't got it yet – she's speaking to the manager now.

Jamie: Hmm.

Emily: Anyway, I must go. See you.

Carolina: Yes that's right. I'm a student. From Venezuela. Yes, I think my English is OK …

Jamie: Say it's good – very good!

Carolina: Good actually, um, it's very good. Come in and talk to you? Yes, of course I can. I'm free tomorrow morning. Now?! Come and see you now? Um, I , um...

Jamie: Say yes! What's the matter?

Carolina: OK, um, yes, of course. Now. Half past ten. OK. Thank you very much. Goodbye. Oh, Jamie – he wants me to go and talk to him. Now!

Jamie: Well, of course he does.

Carolina: Well, yes of course. But now!? What am I going to wear? I need to print out my CV – oh dear, and I should write a list of questions.

Jamie: Whoa. Calm down. This isn't going to be a formal job interview. He won't want to see CV. He only wants to see you and talk to you before he decides.

Carolina: Are you sure?

Jamie: Pretty sure. And what you're wearing now is fine.

Carolina: Shouldn't I wear a suit?

Jamie: Carolina, it's the convenience store at the university – not an international bank.

Carolina: OK.

Jamie: How many hours is the job?

Carolina: He said fifteen hours a week.

Jamie: And which days? Is it weekends? Evenings?

Carolina: I don't know yet.

Jamie: Think about this carefully, Carolina. If you're working in the evenings and at weekends, when are you going to study? And when are we going to see each other?

Carolina: I have to get a job Jamie. Well, I'd better go. I mustn't be late.

Jamie: OK. I'll walk to the bus stop with you. And good luck, OK?

Carolina: Thanks.

Mr Spencer: So, Miss del Barco. You've never worked in a shop before.

Carolina: No, no I haven't. But I know I can do it.

Mr Spencer: It isn't easy in this shop. We sell food, cigarettes, alcohol, newspapers – everything. And it can get very busy – you need to be quick, think fast, be efficient.

Carolina: Oh, yes. I can do that. Definitely.

Mr Spencer: Are you good with money? Good with numbers?

Carolina: Oh yes. Very good.

Mr Spencer: And your visa says you can work here?

Carolina: Yes. I can show you. Here it is.

Mr Spencer: I need someone to start immediately.

Carolina: Yes. Of course.

Mr Spencer: OK. The job's yours.

Carolina: Oh! Thank you!

Mr Spencer: Thursday evening, Friday evening and Saturday from four till midnight. See you on Thursday at half past six.

Carolina: OK. I'll be here. Thank you very much.

 

Adam

Adam: So, Carolina got the job. Good news! When we think about job interviews we usually think about something quite formal. You have to wear a suit or smart clothes and answer lots of questions. But for this kind of part­time job you usually don’t need to do a formal interview. The manager just asked Carolina one or two questions. Has she worked in a shop before? Is she good with money? And that was enough, she got the job.

Today I want to look at prepositions, in particular prepositions of time. Listen to these bits again:

Mr Spencer: Thursday evening, Friday evening and Saturday from four till midnight. See you on Thursday at half past six.

Carolina: OK, I’ll be here.

Jamie: Think about this carefully, Carolina. If you're working in the evenings and at weekends, when are you going to study?

Carolina: Come in and talk to you? Yes, of course I can. I'm free tomorrow morning.

Adam: The manager said ‘See you on Thursday at 6 o’clock’ – why is it ‘on Thursday’, but ‘at 6 o’clock’? And ‘at weekends’ and ‘in’ the evenings’. Does it seem a bit confusing? 

Well – we use ‘at’ with times – ‘at 6 o’clock’, with ‘the weekend’ and with ‘night’.

We use ‘on’ with days – ‘on Monday’, and with dates ‘on the twenty fifth of April’.

And we use ‘in’ with months – ‘in September’ ­ with seasons – ‘in summer’ and with parts of the day – in the morning’.

There are also times when we don’t use a preposition at all – with ‘tomorrow’ and ‘yesterday’ – 'I’ll see you tomorrow morning’ – and with ’next’ and ‘last’ – ‘see you next time’.

If you find it difficult, try the exercises with this podcast – they’ll help you practise.

You might need to use some of these prepositions when you write to us this time. I’d like you to tell us about your favourite time of day. I like getting up late, but not in the afternoon! I don't want to have breakfast at 2pm. I also like to stay up late at night when it's quiet, but I don't think it's very healthy.

What about you? Are you happiest in the morning or at night? Or maybe in the afternoon? Write and tell us, here’s where you can send your answers: www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish or on Facebook, look for Elementary Podcasts.

Well, that’s all for this time. Thanks for listening. We’ll be back with Tess and Ravi in the next podcast. See you soon!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Select all the true sentences.

Exercise

Pages

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