The future continuous (will be + ‘ing’ form) and the future perfect (will have + past participle) tenses are used to talk about events in the future.

Future continuous

  • Don’t ring at 8 o’clock. I’ll be watching Who Wants to be a Millionaire.
  • This time tomorrow we’ll be sitting on the beach. I can’t wait!

We use the future continuous to talk about something that will be in progress at or around a time in the future.

  • Don’t phone grandma now, she’ll be having dinner.
  • The kids are very quiet. They’ll be doing something wrong, I know it!

These sentences are not about the future but we can use the future continuous to talk about what we assume is happening at the moment.

Future Perfect

  • Do you think you will have finished it by next Thursday?
  • In 5 years time I’ll have finished university and I’ll be able to earn some money at last.

We use the future perfect to say that something will be finished by a particular time in the future.

We often use the future perfect with ‘by’ or ‘in

  • I think astronauts will have landed on Mars by the year 2020.
  • I’ll have finished in an hour and then you can use the computer.

By’ means ‘not later than a particular time’ and ‘in’ means 'within a period of time’. We don’t know exactly when something will finish.

  • I promise I’ll have done all the work by next Saturday.

We don’t know exactly when he will finish the work – maybe Thursday, maybe Friday – but definitely before Saturday. 

Exercise

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Thank alot sir

Hello, Sir could you please tell me what is the deference between
I'll be thinking of you when you go into hospital.
and I'll will think of you when you go into hospital.
and if i say I will be writing for you. that means it happen regularly.
Thank you, Sir

Hello sunrisereham,

A lot of these distinctions depend on the context, so it's hard to differentiate all examples.

I'll be thinking of you when you go into hospital  -  this means the person will do this repeatedly or continuously while the person is in hospital, not just once.

I'll will think of you when you go into hospital  -  this suggests that the person will think about them once, not repeatedly.

I will be writing to you  -  ('to', I think, not 'for') this really depends on the context. It could mean regularly (the most likely option), or it could mean that the action will be in progress at a certain time (less likely, but possible).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, Sir according to use the future continuous to talk about what we assume is happening at the moment.
Don’t phone grandma now, she’ll be having dinner.
The kids are very quiet. They’ll be doing something wrong, I know it!
what the difference if I say
she is having dinner
they are doing something wrong
And I have read this topic recently:
We use will (or won't) to indicate that we think a present situation is certain
You will know that John and Sheila are engaged. (= you already know)
If I say you know that John and Sheila are engaged is that correct too?
Thank you, Sir

Hello sunrisereham,

When we use 'will be [verb]ing' we are guessing based on what we expect at a given time. When we use 'are [verb]ing' we are sure.

Similarly, in your second example when you use 'will' you are saying 'this is what I expect to be the case', while when you use the present simple you are stating a fact which is certain.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hi all i'm new here but l've really learned a lots of things thank you a lot

Hello, Sir
What is the difference between future continuous and present continuous for talking about future in those examples:
At 8 o'clock I will be travelling tomorrow
Next Friday the president will be clebreting ten years in power
At 8 o'clock I'm traveling tomorrow
Next Friday the president is celebrating ten years in power
Thank you

Hello sunrisereham,

The present continuous is used to talk about fixed events in the future in a more general way and the future continuous to speak about events that are expected to happen in the normal course of events, almost as if they were inevitable. This is especially true in the case of the president above – there's little that can stop the fact that he'll have been in power for 10 years. In the case of the person travelling, there could be the sense that this plan isn't changeable or was imposed on the person from the outside – it really depends on the context.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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