What was it like to watch one of Shakespeare's plays in the 1600s? Join Ben Crystal on his visit to Shakespeare's Globe, a reproduction of the original Globe Theatre in London.

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Hello, My name is Amit.
after trying hard in IELTS I got R:9.0, L:6.5, W:7.0, S:6.0 when i was trying to score at least 7.0 in each.

What I learnt and I am focusing now is; rather than just practicing and improving over IELTS, I am really interested to improve my overall English skill to the next level, i.e. from Intermediate to Advanced. But somehow I felt that, these materials here are still not for advance level that i am looking for. However, it's still helpful for my regular english corrections and learning in speaking where i am a bit weak. I want you to guide me to find the next level (Advance) english lessons with less common words and routing idioms used.

Hello Amit,

The first thing I would recommend is an IELTS course, as I'm afraid we don't provide individualised tuition here. We do have, however, some general advice on preparing for the IELTS in our IELTS section as well as general advice on improving your speaking on our Frequently asked questions page -- perhaps some of it could be helpful.

I'd also highly recommend TakeIELTS, our Facebook page and the British Council IELTS YouTube channel. Finally, there is also a British Council Understanding IELTS online course at Future Learn.

I'm sure one or more of these resources can help you. Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

No, I rarely go to the theatre.

Comparing between film and television, I would prefer film because of some reasons: It is homier, I can switch it off channels when I feel uninterested and I can share opinions and discuss with friends while watching.

I enjoy a lot going to a theatre. If it is compared to film or television, the theatre is alive whilst the others are plastic. To be in a theatre is a great experience, it is possible to feel the artist's nervous and their ability to be someone else. Additionally, to share the same time gives the possibility to share a mistake and laugh together, that would never happened watching tv or at the cinema.

Please, i don't understand the meaning of verb " thrust out "

Hello Samar Ahmed,

In general, 'thrust' means to 'push'. In this case, the verb is metaphorical and describes the position of the stage. The idea is that the stage takes up space in the yard, where the audience watches the play -- if you look at this photo, you can see how the stage 'thrusts out' into the yard. In some theatres, in contrast, the stage is inside the wall -- see the photo on the Theater Wikipedia page.

I hope that helps you make sense of it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

great explanation ! thanks !

I adore visiting the theater, I can say about yourself that I'm a theatre-goer. If I'm going to attend any performance I'll read the original of story by using book. I imagine the main characters, visualize their appearance read about time and place, where it is set in. After the performance I compare and share my impression with my friends, and if I liked it , i will recommend this performance. It is worth seeing.

I have never been to a theatre, but I like it that it's so alive, I believe that the margin of error was little while actors acting , so the acting must be kinda intense and lively. They must have to exaggerate their expression of emotions. So that people sit far away from the stage could understand whatsgoing on on the stage. I think I would definitely enjoy it. When it compares to tv or movie, the equipment and the special effect will be lame so to speak.

I think I would like to enjoy going to the theatre but I've never gone to the theatre.
If I had seen a good play like Romeo and Juliet, I could be a theatre-goer.
I don't like to compare play to film or television because those are very different.
A Play begets emotion in reality by real sound, real face and intrinsic performance. Film or television is transmitted by editing.

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