Stephen and Ashlie arrive at the hotel in Snowdonia, but they don't have the same idea about how to relax!

Instructions

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the transcript at any time.

Task 1

Comprehension Task

What did you learn about Snowdonia?

Choose the best answer to these questions.

Exercise

Task 2

Comprehension Task 2

Read the statements about Stephen and Ashlie and decide if they are true or false.

Exercise

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Comments

hello
is it right to say "one and a half hours" or
"one hour and a half".
"two mangoes and a half" or "two and a half mangoes".
thanks.
which is preferable or right?

Hello Baahubali,

Both formulations are possible..

For hours I think the first formulation ('one and a half hours') is most common. For other things the second formulation is more typical.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello
seek your advice
"you need not tell a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed."
i'm confused whether i should change "asked to ask"or "need not to need not have".
tell me which is preferable?

Hello Baahubali,

'Need not' seems an odd choice in the original sentence. Are you sure you do not mean 'must not' here?

As far as your question goes, I cannot say how you might change the sentence as I do not know the context or what you are trying to say. Are you talking about a situation in the future (you will be before a judge later) or in the past (the meeting with the judge has already happened)?

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello,
actually,i read it in a book written by an author. he has replaced 'need not' to 'need not have'.it means he is talking about a past situation.
but if i change 'asked' to 'ask' then is anything wrong about it.

Hello Baahubali,

There is an inconsistency in the verbs used in the original sentence (which I did not notice in my earlier reply):

You need not tell a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed.

As 'asked' refers to a past action you need to use a perfect modal or a past form:

You did not need to tell a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed.

or

You needn't have told a lie when the judge asked you where you were when the crime was committed

There is a difference in meaning here. 'Needn't have told a lie' means that the person told a lie and it was not necessary. 'Didn't need to tell a lie' means that it was not necessary but does not tell us whether or not the person actually told the lie.

 

 

You can make both verbs present rather than past:

You need not tell a lie when the judge asks you where you were when the crime was committed.

or

You don't need to tell a lie when the judge asks you where you were when the crime was committed.

There is no difference in meaning here. 'Need not' is a more formal choice and sounds a little archaic. Both sentences use present forms to refer to the future.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hallo! Unfortunately the video at this
Internet resource does not open - Connection Error! What is the reason?
Thanks
Best regards

Hello Nastassiaka84,

I'm sorry about that. It sounds to me like a temporary error, but I'm not sure. I've just checked the video and this page and don't see any errors, and I'm able to watch the video. Are you able to see the video now? If not, please try using a different device and/or browser. If you still can't see it, could you please tell us what browser and browser version you're using? It would also be useful to know if you can see videos on other pages of our site, e.g.:

Thanks and once again, I'm sorry for the inconvenience.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello,i have a doubt in this type of structure.can we use past ind like this?
i worked as medical representative for eight month.

Hello Baahubali,

Yes, the past simple verb 'worked' is correct in this sentence. Please note that the subject pronoun 'I' is always capitalised, and the word 'month' should be plural ('months').

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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