Stories and Poems

 

This section is a collection of stories and poems written by famous writers like Shakespeare and Wordsworth as well as stories by our resident writer, Chris Rose. 

They are suitable for learners from Intermediate to Advanced level. 

 

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    My friend is afraid of spiders. This isn’t very unusual; a lot of people are afraid of spiders. But my friend isn’t just afraid of spiders, she is totally, completely and utterly terrified of them….

  • A cat and a dog

    Rudyard Kipling used to tell his daughter stories like "How did the camel get his hump?" The stories end with a poem as a summary. This one tells us why many people prefer dogs to cats.

  • A tree on a white background

    "O you shaggy-headed banyan tree standing on the bank of the pond, have you forgotten the little child, like the birds that have nested in your branches and left you?"

  • A spilt pill bottle

    "Long, long the night, Heavy comes the morrow" In this poem (written as a song), the great Scottish poet Robert Burns laments the illness of his loved one.

  • A big fake nose and glasses

    It is the 22nd century and the world is very different. With new technologies, people can have the bodies that they want. See what happens when Mr. Smith decides to change his body. 

  • "O mother, lay your hand on my brow! | O mother, mother, where am I now?" In this sad little poem by Robert Louis Stevenson, a mother spends the night at her sick child's bedside.

  • "Abandon the flock and abolish the herd". This funny poem explores what would happen if we stopped farming sheep and cattle and started cultivating beans instead!

  • This poem is about teaching English and conveys powerful emotions through observation of small, almost banal details: shoes in shoe shops, bright dresses, the artificial language of an English lesson.

  • This lovely short poem was written by a learner of English, Irene Soriano Flórez, a student at the British Institute for Young Learners in Madrid.

  • iStock_000010009854XSmall - poems image

    This Taoist poem shows that trying to label something can make a non-existent thing wrongly seem as if it had concrete or material existence, as Starshine finds out when he questions Non-Being.

  • '…That floats on high o'er vales and hills…' This famous poem by William Wordsworth (1770-1850) was inspired by the spring flower, the yellow or golden daffodil.

  • In this fable – written by Ralph Waldo Emerson, the American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement - a squirrel and a mountain have an argument!

  • A big fake nose and glasses

    It is the 22nd century and the world is very different. With new technologies, people can have the bodies that they want. See what happens when Mr. Smith decides to change his body. 

  • No

    Thomas Hood wrote at the start of the nineteenth century, but he sounds surprisingly modern. In this poem, Hood takes a look at winter in a cold, urban climate, expressed with a nice sense of humour.

  • A spilt pill bottle

    "Long, long the night, Heavy comes the morrow" In this poem (written as a song), the great Scottish poet Robert Burns laments the illness of his loved one.